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Defragmentation recommendation


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#1 GoshenBleeping

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 01:06 PM

System: WIndows 7 Home Premium, 64 bit, SP1

Laptop: ASUS K52F

 

Is there a general rule of thumb for when it is advisable to defrag the HDD? My HDD is divided into C & D.  C's fragmentation is 1% - no need to defrag. D's fragmentation is 6% - is it worth defragging?

 

Another question:  Should one be cautious about defragging because defragmentation can cause HDD problems?  Or not to be concerned?

 

Thank you.



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 02:38 PM

Defragmentation is a basic partition/drive maintenance task.  To ask if it harms the hard drive...is a non sequitur, IMO.

 

My general rule for defragging...whenever I feel like it might improve system response.  I do so after running the chkdsk /r command first and I run the chkdsk /r command much more frequently than I actually decide to defrag a given partition, even though I thought it important enough earlier to throw some money in the path of Raxco, developers of Perfect Disk :).  If the system seems sluggish or out of sorts...I will run the two commands I have mentioned...possibly follow that up with running the sfc /scannow command.  I don't really have a method...I don't have many problems with my systems.

 

SSDs are not be defragmented, at all..

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 01 December 2015 - 02:39 PM.


#3 dudeage

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 02:41 PM

I agree with hamluis that really you only need to run it if you notice your system slowing down.  

 

You're always welcome to run disk defragmentor - I have yet to run into an instance in which it actually harms the system - but unless you're having issues with speed and no other root causes of the issue (malware, too little HDD free space, too little RAM, bad RAM, etc.) then any improvements you'll see by regularly running the Windows utility will be little to none.  



#4 GoshenBleeping

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 04:20 PM

Thankk you both for your quick response. Much appreciated.

I run chkdsk & sfc periodically but hardly ever defrag.

 

Thanks again.



#5 RolandJS

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 04:45 PM

Defragging bi-monthly may be all you need to do; defragging tools often include a function of quick-checking the health of a HD [not SSD]; myabe useful bi-monthly.


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#6 Legobot90

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 11:46 AM

If I may, AdvancedSystemCare (even the free version) does a full scan of the computer, removing errors and optimizing the system.

It also comes with a Defragmenter program that may be useful.

 

I must warn against Driver Booster (which tends to install from the suite), and if you have Windows Updates set for "notify but let me choose," it will override you on scanning. But other than that, I've found it worked wonders on most of my systems.

 

Anyways, I tend to run the scan with AdvancedsystemCare, do a bit of file cleaning (removing duplicate documents or downloads, or uninstalling a program I realize I no longer use,) and then proceed to defragment.

In the save vain as hamlouis, I run the scans if I feel like it will benefit. And then proceed to defrag if the scans picked up a lot, or proceed to delete some stuff, and then defrag.


Edited by Legobot90, 02 December 2015 - 11:55 AM.


#7 hamluis

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 11:29 AM

The topic...basic question...revolves around defragmentation.  There is no reason to suggest the use of any product, such as those mentioned in the above post, in this topic.

 

Advanced System Care is an optimizer/registry cleaner.  BC does not support the use of such, see Registry Cleaner, Animal - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/526247/tune-up-utilities-2014-problem/?p=3303494 .

 

Louis



#8 dc3

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 12:00 PM

Open the Task Scheduler and set the defragmenter to run once a week and forget it.

 

It has been pointed out that you don't need to defragment a SSD.  It has also been suggested that chkdsk /r be run on a regular bases.  It should be noted that you do not want to run chkdsk /r on a SSD.  You should run chkdsk /f.

 

If you picture a garage floor covered with boxes this is basically what your hdd is like.  When you install a program it will go into as many boxes as needed to complete the installation.  These files are installed in a contiguous area, but can become fragmented over time.  Fragmentation usually occurs when you delete or write files.  When this happen your program files can get spread out into boxes that have no order to their location.  This is what disk fragmentation creates and defragmentation resolves.


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