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Why is Administrator limited?


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#1 clayto

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 01:56 PM

I have the Administrator account on my computer. I am the only User, no other accounts have been made.  So why is it from time to time I find I am blocked from doing something as I do not have permission? Who else but me fas permission? Examples include permission refused for accessing a particular file (not one requiring a password, which would be understandable) and particularly being refused to permission to save somewhere (nowhere 'special') so I have to save to a folder other than the one I had chosen, or selected by an app. 

 

Also, as I am also always the Administrator, why do I have to opt in to what I am in the first place as with Cmd prompt?   

 

I used to get apps not launching because I was Administrator, and the only way out I discovered was to reset.



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 04:54 PM

The simplest explanation I can give is that above the level of 'Administrator' in a windows OS there is a level of 'Super-Administrator' to which you do not routinely have access. This has been the situation since, I believe, at least Vista.

 

It is generally agreed that routinely running a computer system with 'administrator' privileges is a 'bad thing' from a security point of view so MS introduced the super-A since nearly every private user of a windows computer runs it as 'Admin'. Do not ask me how to gain 'Super Administrator' privileges, I have to look it up every time I need it !

 

As for your problem with saving files in certain folders, this may just be a matter of the default permissions for that folder. These can usually be changed through the folder properties box if you right click on the folder in Windows Explorer.. You are not  alone in having this sort of problem, I am currently trying to work out why I cannot share some folders - containing only my own work - from my desktop to other computers on the network.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 Wolverine 7

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 05:19 PM

Do not ask me how to gain 'Super Administrator' privileges, I have to look it up every time I need it !

 

 

Well,thats nothing iv,e never even heard of it.

 

http://www.thewindowsclub.com/activate-windows-super-administrator-account
 

 

I am currently trying to work out why I cannot share some folders - containing only my own work - from my desktop to other computers on the network.

 

 

You didnt upgrade to win 10 and have the broken homegroup issue by any chance (ie the ugrade can break the homegroup,effecting folder sharing even if you dont use it for sharing folders).Fix is to recreate the homegroup on all machines?






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