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Reinstalling Linux switching from NetRunner to Linux Mint KDE


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#1 SuperSapien64

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 12:59 AM

Hi I'm switching from Netrunner to Linux Mint KDE and theres a few things I would like to do.

First I want to do custom installation I want the home folder to be separate form the root, I'm not sure how much space I need for root I know with swap it should match your RAM size though.

Secondly I have some security questions. I'm thinking about purchasing Eset Nod32 because I dual boot with Windows but I've told that an AV might make me more open to attack is this true? And should I set up App Armor with Nod32 if so please explain who to properly configure A-Armor to work with Nod32?

Lastly and least important I would love to have video live wallpaper software installed something like DreamDesktops



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#2 Al1000

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 08:17 AM

I'm not sure how much space I need for root


All root needs is 10GB or so, as long as you are not planning on installing too many applications. However I would be inclined to use 20GB or more depending on how much space you have, and what you plan on installing.
 

I know with swap it should match your RAM size though


Not necessarily.

My old laptop which only has 768 MiB of RAM, has a 1.5 GiB swap partition, and it needs it. Whereas my desktop pc has 4GiB of RAM and I've never seen it use more than a few hundred MiB of swap.

I don't know anything about Eset Not32 or live wallpaper so will leave that for someone else who does.

Edited by Al1000, 27 November 2015 - 08:18 AM.


#3 NickAu

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 04:57 PM

 

I would love to have video live wallpaper software installed something like DreamDesktops

Just FYI with live wallpaper you may not be able to click on desktop icons

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:fyrmir/livewallpaper-daily

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install livewallpaper livewallpaper-config livewallpaper-indicator 

To remove.

Use ppa-purge to uninstall livewallpaper. First you need to install ppa-purge:

sudo apt-get install ppa-purge

Then run the following command if you installed livewallpaper from the daily ppa:

sudo ppa-purge ppa:fyrmir/livewallpaper-daily

 



#4 SuperSapien64

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 01:01 AM

 

I'm not sure how much space I need for root

All root needs is 10GB or so, as long as you are not planning on installing too many applications. However I would be inclined to use 20GB or more depending on how much space you have, and what you plan on installing.
 

I think I'll give give the Root 500GB or so since I'm planning to play games on it.

 

I know with swap it should match your RAM size though


Not necessarily.

My old laptop which only has 768 MiB of RAM, has a 1.5 GiB swap partition, and it needs it. Whereas my desktop pc has 4GiB of RAM and I've never seen it use more than a few hundred MiB of swap.
 

I have 16GB of RAM so by your measure maybe about 25GB?

 

 

 

I would love to have video live wallpaper software installed something like DreamDesktops

Just FYI with live wallpaper you may not be able to click on desktop icons

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:fyrmir/livewallpaper-daily

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install livewallpaper livewallpaper-config livewallpaper-indicator 

To remove.

Use ppa-purge to uninstall livewallpaper. First you need to install ppa-purge:

sudo apt-get install ppa-purge

Then run the following command if you installed livewallpaper from the daily ppa:

sudo ppa-purge ppa:fyrmir/livewallpaper-daily

So does this live wallpaper app play videos (MP4, WMV , etc) as wallpaper?



#5 NickAu

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 02:08 AM

 

So does this live wallpaper app play videos (MP4, WMV , etc) as wallpaper?

That 1 no

 

 

But this might work.

How to use a video as "desktop wallpaper" on linux



#6 Al1000

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 05:58 AM

I have 16GB of RAM so by your measure maybe about 25GB?


The message I was trying to convey is that my laptop uses swap a lot because it doesn't have much RAM, whereas my desktop pc hardly ever uses swap because it has more RAM.

The "rule of thumb" to have a swap partition that's 1 - 1.5 x the size of the RAM, dates from the days when computers didn't have much RAM.

With 16GB of RAM I wouldn't bother with swap, or else make a small 1GB swap partition just for the sake of it.

EDIT: Unless you are planning on using hibernate, which entails writing the contents of the RAM to swap so that your computer can "sleep." That's the only reason I can think of why you would need a substantial swap partition.

Edited by Al1000, 28 November 2015 - 06:00 AM.


#7 SuperSapien64

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 03:40 PM

 

 

So does this live wallpaper app play videos (MP4, WMV , etc) as wallpaper?

That 1 no

 

 

But this might work.

How to use a video as "desktop wallpaper" on linux

 

XwinRap looks a little difficult to use but easy to install/un-install. Please look at this discussion: https://forum.kde.org/viewtopic.php?f=83&t=119463 and both of these: http://kde-look.org/content/show.php/Animated+Video+Wallpaper?content=112105

https://github.com/jarzebski/Plasma-Wallpaper-DreamDesktop I don't know how install either one of these.

 

 

With 16GB of RAM I wouldn't bother with swap, or else make a small 1GB swap partition just for the sake of it.

EDIT: Unless you are planning on using hibernate, which entails writing the contents of the RAM to swap so that your computer can "sleep." That's the only reason I can think of why you would need a substantial swap partition.

 

Which I am. So how much do you think I should give to swap?



#8 Al1000

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 06:03 PM

In that case I would go with 16GB, but bear in mind that writing 16GB to your hard drive means that it will take a lot longer to hibernate than it would to shut down, that is, if hibernate works.

I thought hibernate would be disabled by default in Mint like it is in *buntu, so I looked up the internet for instructions on how to enable it for you, and found this:

2.4. Unfortunately, "hibernate" (suspend-to-disk) is enabled by default in Linux Mint. Which is rather surprising, because in Ubuntu it's disabled by default...

This aggressive sleep mode often leads to problems, because most manufacturers of BIOS and UEFI don't stick to the standards for implementing power saving. So your computer may experience malfunctions after waking up, or even enter a coma from which it can't awake at all.

It's therefore best to disable hibernation.

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/mint-cinnamon-first#TOC-Disable-hibernation-suspend-to-disk-


If you do try it, please let us know how you get on.

#9 SuperSapien64

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 05:25 PM

I talked to one of my associates and he had difficulties with a custom installation, so I decided not to do this. But either way thanks for the help.

Now all I have to do is figure out how to install Animated Video Wallpaper. :scratchhead: http://kde-look.org/content/show.php/Animated+Video+Wallpaper?content=112105



#10 Al1000

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 07:10 AM

I talked to one of my associates and he had difficulties with a custom installation, so I decided not to do this. But either way thanks for the help.


Just because hibernate didn't work on his hardware doesn't mean that it won't work on yours.

#11 mremski

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 07:43 AM

Keep in mind that swap is also used for kernel crash dumps  (if configured for them).  Crash dumps will typically include a lot of different ram areas so if you have disk space available and plan on mucking around with custom kernels, a 1.5x RAM for swap even with 16G RAM is helpful.

 

Root partition sizing is always a fun one.  Most distributions put everything on a single partition:  works fine until you have a runaway app that fills up /var/log.  Then you learn how to boot into single user mode, delete files and reboot.

 

My personal opinion:

separate /boot (if needed), /, /var, /usr and /home partitions.  Newer filesystems (LLVM, ZFS, etc) make this less of a hard requirement, but old habits sometimes are hard to get rid of.

 

As an example, my home system I have a 128GB SSD for the OS, and a 3TB for user files (/home).  This makes it very unlikely for a user mistake to make the system unbootable.  Also lets you do good security stuff by setting permissions on system files so they can't be altered easily.


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#12 Al1000

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 08:06 AM

Keep in mind that swap is also used for kernel crash dumps (if configured for them).


Looks like that would have to be installed on *buntu.

https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/kernel-crash-dump.html

#13 SuperSapien64

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 02:58 PM

 

I talked to one of my associates and he had difficulties with a custom installation, so I decided not to do this. But either way thanks for the help.


Just because hibernate didn't work on his hardware doesn't mean that it won't work on yours.

 

Well he didn't have problems with hibernation he ran out of storage space under root. I found a tutorial video on how to do this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KNK8OXIFyQ :thumbup2:


Edited by SuperSapien64, 06 December 2015 - 03:26 PM.


#14 pcpunk

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 08:16 PM

I talked to one of my associates and he had difficulties with a custom installation, so I decided not to do this. But either way thanks for the help.

Now all I have to do is figure out how to install Animated Video Wallpaper. :scratchhead: http://kde-look.org/content/show.php/Animated+Video+Wallpaper?content=112105

 

I think this is not something to worry about.  With help here you can do this with ease, I have done it many times  and I am just a home user.  However, I don't suggest doing it on your own, with just a little preparation we can get you in the right direction.  Be aware of video's on youtube, they are helpful for bits and pieces of info, and getting used to seeing what the installer will look like when you get ready to install.  We can even install to a USB if you like for some practice, this will allow you to understand the installer etc.  It's simple but foreign to non linux users. 

 

At the minimum, I would suggest doing /root, home/ and swap, not necessarily in that order either, it will depend on where the space for linux is and how much you have for it.  I agree with Al000 that 20 is plenty, although if you don't have the space...then again...as he said...maybe 10GB would be fine.  I use 17 for /root, and still have 6.8GB left to use.

 

Even the standard install might be confusing if one has never done it, especially if installing to a particular partition.  If you want help just yell and we'll get the necessary info from you to proceed.

 

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#15 cat1092

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 02:22 AM

 

 

I have 16GB of RAM so by your measure maybe about 25GB?

 

Unless you're running the OS to host virtual machines or any very resource intensive tasks, or hibernate your OS, 1GiB of Swap is fine, or 2GiB for a comfort zone. Still, you'll find yourself using little Swap with Linux, and unlike Windows, you won't get a lot of 'low memory' popups by doing this. In essence, it's the same thing as the pagefile on a Windows OS. 

 

Even if you were to run virtual machines, a 4GiB Swap should suffice, even if you're warned that more will be needed. 

 

Good Luck with MInt KDE! :thumbup2:

 

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