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Do You Recommend Windows 10 to Customers?


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5 replies to this topic

Poll: Do You Recommend Windows 10 to Customers? (12 member(s) have cast votes)

Do You Recommend Windows 10 to Customers

  1. Yes (6 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

  2. No (6 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

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#1 ellbristow

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 03:30 AM

Hey guys.

 

This post is not asking for specific opinions for or against Win10, I am just curious to know if the shop staff and technicians among us are yet recommending the upgrade to Windows 10 to their customers/friends/family etc.

 

In our shop, we have been suggesting to people to wait until Microsoft release a few more updates, and expect the upgrade to be "Safe" around February/March time... but I'm interested to know if others feel it might be ready now for commercial deployment, particularly in light of the November release.

 

In our experience the upgrade has been ok on Towers, but rocky on laptops, unless installed fresh on the laptop, in which case it seems to be ok... so it's really only the UPGRADE I'm interested in.

 

No need to post explanations, flames etc... let's keep it civil... just a simple Yes or No is fine... and maybe an explanation of what role you would play in the recommendation (retailer, internal support, neighborhood go-to person etc)

 

Thanks!


Edited by ellbristow, 25 November 2015 - 03:31 AM.


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#2 Aura

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 12:59 PM

I do recommend Windows 10 to people if they ask me about it. I usually tell them that if they want to install it and try it out, they are free to do so (and it's also free if they have Windows 7, 8 or 8.1) so why not.

As for my "customers", they are employees (since I do corporate technical support) and eventually we'll migrate to Windows 10. The Web Dev. Team is already testing out Windows 10 and Microsoft Edge, while our Lead Analyst for Software Management and Deployment is testing it on his work laptop (a second Analyst is now testing it). We still have a year or so of testing to do, before we start talking about how the migration will go, but in the end we will move to Windows 10, and this before 2020.

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 01:46 PM

In my case it really depends on the customer.  For anyone on Windows 8 it's an unquestionable, "Yes, upgrade."   For those on Windows 7 I explain that there was a significant break in what had historically been the Windows look and feel with the introduction of Windows 8.  If they are comfortable with the idea of a learning curve for the new parts of the interface I tell them to try it out.  If they are clearly not I encourage them to stay with Windows 7 for the time being.  I also let anyone who's thinking of going to Windows 10 know that it is in it's early stages and there will likely be the occasional bugs/glitches which get ironed out as they are identified in wide release.


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#4 leithanne

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Posted 25 November 2015 - 05:18 PM

I'm just the friendly neighborhood grandma, who folks come to for cookies and tech advice. ~g~ Like Brian, for me, it depends.

 

I only suggest upgrading to folks who have a decent ability to deal with small glitches, driver issues, and a clean install if things go sideways. Everyone else I tell to wait, because I know that I'll be the one who will have to walk them through the fixes because "You told me to upgrade!".

 

As for buying a new computer with Win 10 pre-installed, I say "Go for it."  to most folks. Gotta learn the new OS, sometime, and there shouldn't he hardware incompatibilities with a computer made for Win 10.



#5 carlito777

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 07:32 AM

Let's face it, Microsoft it's not the most innovative company. They're just more successful in marketing rather than innovation, sometimes by even bullying their competition. Bill Gates, who was a pre-law major at Harvard bought the rights to what later became to be known as DOS then licensed it to IBM. That was the beginning of MS. 



#6 jargos

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 08:08 PM

Let's face it, Microsoft it's not the most innovative company. They're just more successful in marketing rather than innovation, sometimes by even bullying their competition. Bill Gates, who was a pre-law major at Harvard bought the rights to what later became to be known as DOS then licensed it to IBM. That was the beginning of MS. 

.. and to paraphrase him (can't be bothered looking for the actual quote, but this is pretty close) ..

 

If you can't make it good, at least make it look good!


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