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#1 therealcrazy8

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 04:29 PM

I'll try to keep a long story short, but after spending 4 years at ITT (huge mistake) and getting my Bachelors in Information System Security/Cyber Security degree (the only blessing from that mistake) and have had some struggle with getting even an entry level position. I have all sorts of IT experience and security is what I really want to be doing. This has lead me to think about some things considering where I am in life (I'm 36) and doing helpdesk work. Not where I was hoping to be after all of my experience and schooling.

 

Anyway, enough of that. My idea is looking into IT security for home users. With the number of users at home (young and old) who are unaware of the threats out there, or at least how to protect themselves from them, especially when considering things like identity theft, phishing scams, or the teenage punk next door. I see a need here and quite honestly these people deserve better than the clowns at Geek Squad. Here are some of my ideas with this possible endeavor.

 

* Install new wireless routers (with security in mind)

- change SSID or don't broadcast

- change default password

- review security options

- limit number of devices / MAC filtering

 

* setup/install firewalls (software and hardware options)

* install antivirus software

* new network installs

* running cable

 

* backup solution

- Not sure what this would look like but I have 4 years experience of Symantec Backup Exec experience and even though that may not come into play as far as that software, I would like to offer an affordable backup solution, perhaps even free that i could even apply a monthly charge to if I house the backups. I do have my own web server that backups could somehow be stored on, or I could come up with something else, but either way, I think an affordable backup solution would be nice. The capability of doing a full system backup would be nice, but maybe just file backups is a bit more obtainable for now?

 

* Perform virus/malware/spyware scans

* Network upgrades (routers, switches, cables, NIC's, etc.)

* Firmware updates

 

Later down the road:

- maybe offer different (3) security "packages" (from users who do little to nothing on their computers, to the user who maybe works from home and needs some additional layers of security)

- Home network pen-testing (of sorts)

 

A few things I am trying to figure out is:

- If I were to do a backup solution, as far as being able to do full system restores, what are some good options for that?

 

- As far as hardware (routers, switches, NIC's etc.) can the "little guy" have opportunity to get hardware from certain brands to install and turn a small profit off as a opposed to going to Best Buy or something? Not a big deal, just curious about that.

 

- Kind of also looking for some constructive criticism / reinforcement on my idea with all of this. I am not looking to try to sell corporate solutions to home users. Just wanting to apply my knowledge and experience to help the home users protect themselves better than what they may be.

 

Any help or constructive criticism on this would be very much appreciated.

Thanks


Edited by therealcrazy8, 18 November 2015 - 07:37 PM.


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#2 Bulgaristan

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 06:21 AM

I'll try to keep a long story short, but after spending 4 years at ITT (huge mistake) and getting my Bachelors in Information System Security/Cyber Security degree (the only blessing from that mistake) and have had some struggle with getting even an entry level position. I have all sorts of IT experience and security is what I really want to be doing. This has lead me to think about some things considering where I am in life (I'm 36) and doing helpdesk work. Not where I was hoping to be after all of my experience and schooling.

 

Anyway, enough of that. My idea is looking into IT security for home users. With the number of users at home (young and old) who are unaware of the threats out there, or at least how to protect themselves from them, especially when considering things like identity theft, phishing scams, or the teenage punk next door. I see a need here and quite honestly these people deserve better than the clowns at Geek Squad. Here are some of my ideas with this possible endeavor.

 

* Install new wireless routers (with security in mind)

- change SSID or don't broadcast - every backtrack software will recover hidden SSID

- change default password - this will help in a way but the best is to have decent password including numbers, capital letters and special character : example "2015Eco!"

- review security options

- limit number of devices / MAC filtering - best solution ever

 

* setup/install firewalls (software and hardware options) - Hardware firewalls are awesome, still to expensive for home users 

* install antivirus software - You do not need to have move than MS security essential, Malwarebytes and Adblocker

* new network installs 

* running cable - is great but this sometimes mean to literally destroy your home comfort 
The best way to protect home users of such intrusions is to coach them on elementary things like:
    1. Never open attachments from unknown email address

    2. Do not click on pop-ups and adds.

    3. When you are installing software always install only the software you like, great tool for this is unchecky.

    4.Never trust to software promising computer performance boost or automatic driver installation.

 

* backup solution

- Not sure what this would look like but I have 4 years experience of Symantec Backup Exec experience and even though that may not come into play as far as that software, I would like to offer an affordable backup solution, perhaps even free that i could even apply a monthly charge to if I house the backups. I do have my own web server that backups could somehow be stored on, or I could come up with something else, but either way, I think an affordable backup solution would be nice. The capability of doing a full system backup would be nice, but maybe just file backups is a bit more obtainable for now?

 

My personal opinion is to backup only the files you need, the rest as software and OS can be reinstalled easy.
Format and clean installation of OS resolving 90% of the problems, the rest 10% are related with hardware.

 

* Perform virus/malware/spyware scans

* Network upgrades (routers, switches, cables, NIC's, etc.)

* Firmware updates

In this I would like to add only one thing, when you are scanning your computer do in safemode without network including clean boot (removing all of the start-up and services not related with Microsoft.

 

​Unfortunately the best way to intrude to someone home is trough smart TV, the TV have less security than every other device in your home.
 

Later down the road:

- maybe offer different (3) security "packages" (from users who do little to nothing on their computers, to the user who maybe works from home and needs some additional layers of security)

- Home network pen-testing (of sorts)

 

A few things I am trying to figure out is:

- If I were to do a backup solution, as far as being able to do full system restores, what are some good options for that?

 

A couple ears ago I was doing complete system image including all of my software and drivers, instead reinstalling my OS i have full image after fresh install, however this was not so sufficient as the time I was using the system, there was many drivers and software updates. I realize time wise is the same and the result of clean installation is obvious. 

 

- As far as hardware (routers, switches, NIC's etc.) can the "little guy" have opportunity to get hardware from certain brands to install and turn a small profit off as a opposed to going to Best Buy or something? Not a big deal, just curious about that.

There so many brands for switches and routers, the truth is I`v never seen better than dd-wrt  this is customized router software working with most of the vendors.

 

- Kind of also looking for some constructive criticism / reinforcement on my idea with all of this. I am not looking to try to sell corporate solutions to home users. Just wanting to apply my knowledge and experience to help the home users protect themselves better than what they may be.

 

There is no reason for criticism you are doing great :) 

 

Any help or constructive criticism on this would be very much appreciated.

Thanks



#3 Kilroy

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 07:29 AM

The problem with offering home technology security for the home is that security is a constant effort, not a one time deal.  There are things that an IT professional will do that are unreasonable to have an average home user do, MAC filtering is a big one.  Sure, MAC filtering works great, but you can expect calls after the user gets a new device and can't connect to their home wireless, and that's only after they have spent hours trying to get it connected.

 

The same applies to backup.  A good backup solution follows the 3-2-1 Backup Strategy.     Additionally involves periodic restores to verify the backup.

 

Doing anything in a user's home makes them think that you are responsible for any issues they have.  You set up their new wireless printer and the next day they can't watch videos on YouTube and they will blame you.






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