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Recovery Drive


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#1 bobyboy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 11:04 AM

I cannot create a recovery drive, help please.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 11:34 AM

This sort of request is so vague that it's impossible to help.

 

Are you trying to create a System Repair Disk or a System Image for recovery?

 

What have you done so far?  If you've tried anything, are you getting error messages?

 

Telling us that you cannot create a recovery drive, but nothing else, is almost like saying, "I'm lost somewhere in Europe, help me get home," without having any idea where you're lost or where home is.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#3 bobyboy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 11:56 AM

Sorry, this is what I am trying to dosee  http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/create-a-recovery-drive 

 

And get the following messages'We can't create the recovery drive' 'A problem occured while creating the recovery Drive'.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 12:02 PM

FYI, the link you posted got posted incorrectly, but here's the page you were referring to:  Create a recovery drive

 

For myself, I suggest that people do not use USB recovery drives for several reasons, the primary one being that most people will eventually want to use a USB flash drive for something else and will overwrite their recovery drive.  Use a DVD instead if you can.

 

To create one go to Control Panel->Backup and Restore (Windows 7)  [which will still create you a Windows 10 repair/recovery disc, but using the Win7 method].

 

Click the "Create a System Repair Disc" link on the left side.  Follow the instructions that it gives you that follow.  I believe you can even use a USB drive for this technique if you insist, but I can't remember that for certain since I never use USB for system repair/recovery discs.

 

If this does not work then post again with the error message(s) you get for additional advice.


Edited by britechguy, 18 November 2015 - 12:03 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#5 BIGBEARJEDI

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 12:11 PM

Hi,

 

I haven't created a USB recovery drive using this procedure as yet, so I don't know whether it will work to solve your problem.  You still haven't provided us with enough information to help decide whether this is the right tool to fix your computer/laptop/tablet or not.  Please post back Make/Model of your device so we can better advise you. 

 

What's unclear is whether or not this download has the same full WinPE environment that's on the W10 clean install USB bootable drive or not.  You may have limited options for Recovery or repair of your W10 if this is the case.  Furthermore, if you upgraded your computer from an earlier version of windows such as Win7/8/8.1/8.1.1, this Recovery drive may not work either.  Did this computer you are having a problem with come with W10 pre-installed on it from the factory or did you upgrade from an earlier version of Windows?  Which version? 

 

Personally, without knowing your exact hardware specs and the age of this computer (you could have a brand new computer you bought yesterday or it could be 10 yrs. old for all we know), I wouldn't recommend creating the Recovery USB drive on the same computer you are trying to repair.  That should ALWAYS be done on a separate working fully functional computer or laptop. 

 

Can we please get some more information from you on WHAT the problem is you have that's requiring you to do a Recovery, as Britechguy said, or an error message with code # on it???

 

Thanks,
<<<BBJ>>>


Edited by BIGBEARJEDI, 18 November 2015 - 12:13 PM.


#6 RolandJS

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 12:33 PM

Britechguy, many now have cd-dvd-driveless slimlines, they have to create USB flash drive boots, or purchase an external cd-dvd reader/writer and then make their DVD boots.  I put markings on my usb flash drives to remind me what is on them, so that I do not accidentally overwrite them.


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Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 britechguy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 12:50 PM

Roland,

 

          I do realize that using USB is sometimes necessary, and when it is then that's what you have to do.  It's expensive, though, compared to the cost of a DVD-R when you have the option to use a DVD-R, and less prone to accidental loss or overwriting.

 

          I have a "technology miscellany drawer" where I keep all of this sort of stuff in the event I might need it.

 

          I am hoping that the original poster is trying to do "what one should do" and create recovery media on a non-trashed machine, whether that machine is new or not.  If it's already in trouble of some sort I agree with BBJ, one should never even attempt to create recovery media from a machine in a questionable state.  Few people know that you can create Windows System Repair/Recovery media from any other machine that's running the same version of Windows you have (it may, in fact, cross Windows versions including releases and 32/64-bit, but I've never even attempted to test this out).  The recovery media is simply a bootable subset of basic Windows recovery functions, so the recovery media you create on, for example, your Win7 Gateway Desktop will work in exactly the same way as one created on your Win7 ASUS laptop would.  I've had to create recovery media for those who failed to do so on more than one occasion and use it to perform a repair or recovery, so I know this works.

 

           It is always preferable to have the computer make & model as well as the OS version (though I presume Win10 given the forum) in order to give focused answers.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#8 RolandJS

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 12:54 PM

Britechguy, absolutely agreed!  I have two stacks of DVD rescue disks, one at home, one in my travel case, for troubleshooting-booting  :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 bobyboy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 01:57 PM

FYI, the link you posted got posted incorrectly, but here's the page you were referring to:  Create a recovery drive

 

For myself, I suggest that people do not use USB recovery drives for several reasons, the primary one being that most people will eventually want to use a USB flash drive for something else and will overwrite their recovery drive.  Use a DVD instead if you can.

 

To create one go to Control Panel->Backup and Restore (Windows 7)  [which will still create you a Windows 10 repair/recovery disc, but using the Win7 method].

 

Click the "Create a System Repair Disc" link on the left side.  Follow the instructions that it gives you that follow.  I believe you can even use a USB drive for this technique if you insist, but I can't remember that for certain since I never use USB for system repair/recovery discs.

 

If this does not work then post again with the error message(s) you get for additional advice.

Done this as suggested on DVD, no problems.

As a matter of interest what should I back up incase of future problems?



#10 britechguy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 04:00 PM

bobyboy,

 

            If your system is currently healthy and happy and running as you'd like it to then the next thing to do is to take a system image backup.  You go to Backup and Restore as before, but click on the "Create a System Image" link.

 

            In order to do this you must have an external drive with sufficient space on it to allow the system image to fit.  You cannot (and would not want to) back up your system image to the same drive as the system itself is on.  Given that 500GB up through 2TB drives are available for under $100 these days, investing in one makes sense if you don't already have one.

 

             I don't make system image backups frequently.  They are best done only when you've installed enough software or done enough other work with the system that redoing it would almost make you crazy.

 

             Then, after that, you should use the same drive (which I presume will have more than enough space left) with the File History feature of Window 10.  You could also use the backup software that comes on the drive (and that's usually the case) to back up your user files instead.  If you store a lot of information on a drive other than the C: drive, or use Public folders a lot, make sure the other drive(s) and the Public folder hierarchy are included as a part of your user data backup.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#11 bobyboy

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 07:04 AM

Thanks for the above info much appreciated, and will do.



#12 bobyboy

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 07:12 AM

I will then have:

System Repair Disk

System Image Backup

File History Backup

All my Documents Backed up.

 

Assume that is all I need if computer crashes?



#13 britechguy

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 09:47 AM

bobyboy,

 

        The first item doesn't need any updating.  You should retake your system image if/when you make enough changes that you wouldn't like to have to try to repeat them.  Remember that a system image is just that, a full system image including your user data and recovering from that is an all or nothing affair.

 

         Using file history and other user data backup software ensures that if you ever need to recover from a system image you won't lose the actual work, downloads, etc., that you've collected since the system image was taken.

 

         If you have all of those things you have everything you can reasonably have in the event of a crash.  It is enough to recover your machine even if you have to replace your hard drive as a result of drive failure.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#14 bobyboy

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 11:53 AM

Many thanks for the confirmation and help.



#15 BIGBEARJEDI

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 07:18 PM

Just a few comments to add to Britechguy's Post #10.  I cannot recommend using Win10's built-in "Create a System Image" program.  My testing from the first Tech Preview version of Win10 dating back to Sep.2014 shows that this option does NOT provide a reliable bootable image with all your stuff on it.  I have not done extensive testing with the July 29th RTM version of Win10 on this, but I don't expect it to work any more reliably than any of the "free" image backup programs providing by Microsoft since Windows95 (1995)!!  I'll provide you with a list of TESTED Win10 backup apps that's I've personally certified for my company.  Here's that list:

 

WINDOWS 10 WORKSHOP: WIN10 BACKUP
 
#1: STAND-ALONE INCREMENTAL/DIFFERENTIAL/FULL BACKUP PROGRAMS

1. Windows10 File Explorer

2.  EaseUS Todo Backup Free 8.6
http://www.todo-backup.com/products/home/free-backup-software.htm

3.  AOEMI Backupper Standard 3.0
http://www.backup-utility.com/free-backup-software.html
4.  Recuva
       http://www.piriform.com/recuva

5.  Paragon Backup and Recovery 14 Free Edition
https://www.paragon-software.com/home/br-free/

 

#2: CLOUD-BASED INCREMENTAL/DIFFERENTIAL/FULL BACKUP PROGRAMS
1.  CARBONITE cloud-based backup (fee-based)
http://www.carbonite.com

2.  CRASH PLAN cloud-based backup (fee-based)
http://www.code42.com/crashplan/

 

#3: IMAGE CLONING BACKUP PROGRAMS*-[tested with Win10]

1. Macrium Reflect Free
http://www.macrium.com/

2.  Acronis True Image 2016
http://www.acronis.com/en-us/personal/computer-backup/

 

***End of Document***

**********************************************************************************

 

The other thing you really need to do that's NOT in your list, is to TEST THE BACKED CLONE IMAGE by wiping out or erase everything on your existing hard drive, running the software and RESTORING YOUR BACKED UP IMAGE back onto the same source drive you originally backed up from.  If you don't actually do this procedure, you'll never know whether your Backup is good or not.  Many of my Customers use my recommended software and make backup images and store them away--BUT THEY NEVER TAKE THE EXTRA SETP TO TEST THEM!!  There is nothing worse than when you hard drive craps out, you buy a new one and install it, and grab your Image Backup software program and your external hard drive or flash drive and it fails to work!  Or you access it, but, again, it fails to work! :o   The best way to do this is to purchase a separate hard drive, as Britechguy mentioned they are cheap these days, and buy the same capacity drive you have now.  Let's say you have a 500GB drive in your computer now fully functional and running Win10.  Buy another 500GB drive, it can be another brand from what you have; say if you have a WD 500GB drive with your Win10 on it you could buy a Seagate or a Toshiba 500GB drive as your test drive.  I recommend you use a brand new drive for this test, not a used one. 

 

Make a Backup Image of your current drive to an external usb drive.  Use one of the two Image backup programs I mention in my Backup Workshop list above (either Macrium or Acronis) to make your Image backup and store it as a file on the usb external.  Then remove your existing drive that you just backed up from your desktop PC or laptop.  Replace with the brand new hard drive, and then run your Rescue Media Disc that you make with the Backup software--it's a bootable disc. Run the Restore Image option in either program, and that will put Win10, all the programs you had installed on your original drive, and all your personal data files, back onto the new hard drive you just installed.  When done, close the Backup program, and reboot your computer.  It should like like a 100% copy of what you had on the original drive, including things like your Windows login, E-mail passwords, installed programs list, etc. and then YOU'LL KNOW IT WORKS!!

 

Should you choose to try this with the built-in "Create a System Image" utility in Windows, you'll most likely find it won't work the way you expect. 

 

Best of luck,

<<<BBJ>>>


Edited by BIGBEARJEDI, 19 November 2015 - 07:20 PM.





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