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"Five Windows 10 privacy settings that have been falsely vilified", TechRepublic


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#1 Aura

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 10:10 AM

Windows 10 default privacy settings do not grant Microsoft access to your most intimate and forbidden secrets. In fact, most of the information Microsoft collects through Windows 10 is the same information Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Twitter, to name just a few, collect about you every time you turn on your computer or smartphone and use their services. If you use the internet, you are being watched. You'd better get used to it.


Source: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/five-windows-10-privacy-settings-that-have-been-falsely-vilified/

I like how all these articles uses the same arguments I've been using since Day 1 on Windows 10 and Microsoft, but that a lot of users ignored or refused to hear. Yet, a lot listened to arguments used in other articles, I wonder if reading this one will make them change their point of view or at least understand a few things.

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#2 britechguy

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 10:22 AM

     . . . I wonder if reading this one will make them change their point of view or at least understand a few things.

 

Most assuredly not.  Reason and rationality have not been the hallmarks of the pitchfork and torch carrying mob-let.


Edited by britechguy, 17 November 2015 - 10:24 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 gigawert

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 10:29 AM

But then again, how can Microsoft monitor dozens of millions of users at once?


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 10:44 AM

But then again, how can Microsoft monitor dozens of millions of users at once?

 

These days that would be a possibility, technologically.   One still has to ask the question:  What would they gain?

 

Companies care about making money from me, and not much else.  With the exception of knowing more about my personal likes/dislikes [generally gathered via what I've browsed for/bought online in the past] to target advertising to me, why would they care about much else?  As this author notes with regard to Win10, even the advertising ID is being anonymized by Microsoft (though I have that feature turned off).

 

It very simply isn't in the business interests of any company to be truly invasive into every personal aspect of your life.  The backlash that would result if actual snooping into the personal details of your life by a business for any reason, nefarious or not, would put them out of business.

 

That data trails exist in order to make technologies like personal electronic assistants function is a given.  Even then, it's not some person that's looking at them for patterns or to figure out where you are at the moment or to destroy your life.  It's not intelligence gathering in any meaningful sense of the word.  If you don't want that sort of data collected, don't use those sorts of services.  I don't, and it's not even because I have any concern about my privacy, but because I simply don't find it useful to me.

 

Anyone who uses computers and the internet and believes they have privacy in the sense that they had it "way back when" has not understood how technology has worked for decades now.  Algorithms are always watching, and what they care about for the most part is trying to sell me something. 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 11:02 AM

The only way one would have privacy on the internet today would be using something like a Tails live CD and browse using Tor but I don't think the average user does Tor.



#6 Aura

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 11:04 AM

I tried Tor a few times. The browsing speed convinced me to never use it again.

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#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 11:13 AM

Yep, that is the biggest disadvantage of Tor. Browsing speed sucks.


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 November 2015 - 11:13 AM.


#8 britechguy

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 11:16 AM

Yep, that is the biggest disadvantage of Tor. Browsing speed sucks.

 

Well, when you think about all the gyrations that Tor has to go through to do what it does, that's not surprising.  I also found that quite a bit of content can "get lost" in the process, too [which tells you a lot about at least some of it].


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 jargos

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 07:26 PM

 

Windows 10 default privacy settings do not grant Microsoft access to your most intimate and forbidden secrets. In fact, most of the information Microsoft collects through Windows 10 is the same information Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Twitter, to name just a few, collect about you every time you turn on your computer or smartphone and use their services. If you use the internet, you are being watched. You'd better get used to it.


Source: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/five-windows-10-privacy-settings-that-have-been-falsely-vilified/

I like how all these articles uses the same arguments I've been using since Day 1 on Windows 10 and Microsoft, but that a lot of users ignored or refused to hear. Yet, a lot listened to arguments used in other articles, I wonder if reading this one will make them change their point of view or at least understand a few things.

 

Vilified ? VILIFIED ???

 

Sheesh - you vilify someone because of their race, or religion, or color, or sexual preference.

 

But VILIFY a computer operating system .. or whatever the thing is becoming ?

 

LOL .. you guys ought to petition the United Nations to make it an illegal thought crime to speak any ill of your Beneficient Overlord.

 

Vilified .. ROFLMAO ..


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#10 Aura

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 07:29 PM

jargos, please contribute to this thread or refrain from posting in it. We aren't discussing the word "vilify" here, but the privacy aspects of Windows 10. Thank you.

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#11 britechguy

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 07:30 PM

@jargos:  You might want to acquaint yourself with a dictionary.  Particularly for vilify and poignant just for starters.

 

P.S. to Aura:  Sorry, I posted while you were typing, but will allow this post to stay.


Edited by britechguy, 17 November 2015 - 07:31 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#12 jargos

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 08:14 PM

jargos, please contribute to this thread or refrain from posting in it. We aren't discussing the word "vilify" here, but the privacy aspects of Windows 10. Thank you.

Oh, OK, OK.

 

Got to get onto the RTA (Road and Transport Authority)web site anyway.

 

They had done some major road diversions this morning and caused havoc - a hour delay.

 

Boy, am I going to vilify them :thumbup2:


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#13 brainout

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 08:38 PM

jargos, please contribute to this thread or refrain from posting in it. We aren't discussing the word "vilify" here, but the privacy aspects of Windows 10. Thank you.

First of all, the word 'vilify' is in the article title, by TechRepublic.  So it is totally appropriate to beg the question, right on topic.  Second, Aura, I wasn't aware that you had been made moderator or something, that you could dictate to others whether they are allowed to post in a thread, especially if they are posting something that's in the topic.

 

You've been behaving as if you were a mod a lot, lately.  So I would appreciate it if we had clarification on whether you have some special right to dictate to others what is and is not a proper post.  Thank you.

 

And for others, I would call attention to the spelling in the TITLE, which is spelled exactly as it appears in TechRepublic.  So if a poster spells it the same way, then the poster should not be vilified (correct spelling in the dictionary, at least Google's online spelling).

 

As for the topic idea, yeah those five things should be vilified:  each one of them is covered by a contract which subjects the user of those 'services' to a Code of Conduct, especially Bing and Cortana.  The article writer glossed over that huge failing, and I chided him for it.  Very much should be vilified, and he pretended like the Code of Conduct provision applicable, didn't exist.  Shameful, in a pundit.  That would be like selling a car which had been in a flood, but not mentioning that fact (which is illegal in most states).  There is no comparable rule in any software or any product on earth, not now nor in the past.

 

There are also reports in the comments in that article of people whose Privacy Settings were reset to 'on' so now they lose privacy.  Worse, there is no indication that the privacy settings had changed.

 

Seems it would be good to discuss those things, but I don't know what Threshold 2 might have done in that regard.


Edited by brainout, 17 November 2015 - 10:06 PM.

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#14 jargos

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 09:15 PM

.. and while you are at it Aura, by what measure did you consider the following acceptable ?

 

pitchfork and torch carrying mob-let.


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#15 jburd1800

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 09:32 PM

Ummm... if you are going to complain, you might to reread the thread. I don't think Aura mentioned any pitchforks.


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