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TV for a computer monitor


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#1 lostsoul65

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 12:40 AM

I'm trying to buy a 32" TV and use it for a computer monitor. It should have 120 Hz, 1080, Smart, HDTV, 4:4:4 chroma mapping but I don't want to spend more than a 32" computer monitor would cost. I know that Costco is selling one for $239 which is a Visio and I know that Visio's are good because I've had one for 3 years and it's great. What I don't know is the 4:4:4 chroma mapping?



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#2 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 07:59 AM

You can read about chroma 4:4:4 here. In short it get you better picture at the cost of latency.


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#3 RolandJS

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:01 AM

You can read about chroma 4:4:4 here. In short it get you better picture at the cost of latency.

What is the cost of latency?  I want to remember this for next time I buy a TV [rather than a computer monitor] for my desktop.


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#4 lostsoul65

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 10:33 AM

Trying to find out if a TV supports 4:4:4 chroma mapping is impossible to fine. I called up Vizio and customer support doesn't know anything so Monday I will have to call Tech support to ask them if they had Chroma Mapping. Does anyone know how I can find out if a TV has 4;4;4 chroma mapping?



#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:58 PM

I like to compare latency when talking about displays, to persistence.  But only a bit more involved because the digital age is involved.  The time it takes for a new frame to be generated, sent to the display and the display to present the frame, that is latency.  In the analog world, the frame is generated and almost instantly present at the display.  Digital displays also use processors to "work over" the frame before sending it to the display controller and getting it on the display.  Loads of machine cycles just within the CPU, add the GPU cycles and send to the display where it eats up more machines within their units on the way to the display element. 



#6 sparklestar

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 11:02 AM

lostsoul65, check out this thread on avsforum.

it says "4:4:4 capability is never listed in the spec sheets. So the only way to determine 4:4:4 capability is to test it yourself"

"For some TVs, you have to set specific TV settings to enable 4:4:4 capability. These include things like switching to special picture modes (i.e., “Game” or “PC” mode)"

Also, Vizio is a mid to low end brand.



Roland, latency is the response time of the tv/monitor. For monitors they list it like 2ms, 5ms, etc. Also tv's apply their own processing to the image, which they do to make it "look better", but it can introduce lag and strange stuff like the Soap Opera Effect (which is when 120hz tv's try to force 60hz content into 120hz by randomly inserting its own frames which ruin the original look of the content and make it look like it's somehow in fast forward without being in fast forward, and gives it a 'too real' look, like a cheaply filmed soap opera).

Some people like these settings but those people are wrong  :grinner:

When you get a new tv, turn off "tru motion" or "smooth motion" settings, and on the fly brightness adjustments.

The problem with latency, the cost of it, is ghosting and perhaps stuttering or strobing effects, which you may notice during movies that are panning around a lot quickly, or possibly during sports. And it is not good for video game consoles. But that is why new tvs have a "Game Mode" which disables added image processing features and just lets the game console shove its video straight through with the best response time it can.

When buying a tv as a tv, I don't see latency being an issue these days, other than going in and disabling some of the new features which make old (and current) television look worse.

I don't recommend you get a tv as a monitor if you are picky enough to care about things like chroma mapping and latency. They are more expensive and they don't look as good.






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