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Beware of ads that use inaudible sound to link your phone, TV, tablet, and PC


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 07:16 PM

 

Privacy advocates are warning federal authorities of a new threat that uses inaudible, high-frequency sounds to surreptitiously track a person's online behavior across a range of devices, including phones, TVs, tablets, and computers.

The ultrasonic pitches are embedded into TV commercials or are played when a user encounters an ad displayed in a computer browser. While the sound can't be heard by the human ear, nearby tablets and smartphones can detect it. When they do, browser cookies can now pair a single user to multiple devices and keep track of what TV commercials the person sees, how long the person watches the ads, and whether the person acts on the ads by doing a Web search or buying a product.

Cross-device tracking raises important privacy concerns, the Center for Democracy and Technology wrote in recently filed comments to the Federal Trade Commission. The FTC has scheduled a workshop on Monday to discuss the technology. Often, people use as many as five connected devices throughout a given day—a phone, computer, tablet, wearable health device, and an RFID-enabled access fob. Until now, there hasn't been an easy way to track activity on one and tie it to another.

"As a person goes about her business, her activity on each device generates different data streams about her preferences and behavior that are siloed in these devices and services that mediate them," CDT officials wrote. "Cross-device tracking allows marketers to combine these streams by linking them to the same individual, enhancing the granularity of what they know about that person."

The officials said that companies with names including SilverPush, Drawbridge, and Flurry are working on ways to pair a given user to specific devices. Adobe is developing similar technologies. Without a doubt, the most concerning of the companies the CDT mentioned is San Francisco-based SilverPush.

 

Cross-device tracking can also be performed through the use of ultrasonic inaudible sound beacons. Compared to probabilistic tracking through browser fingerprinting, the use of audio beacons is a more accurate way to track users across devices. The industry leader of cross-device tracking using audio beacons is SilverPush. When a user encounters a SilverPush advertiser on the web, the advertiser drops a cookie on the computer while also playing an ultrasonic audio through the use of the speakers on the computer or device. The inaudible code is recognized and received on the other smart device by the software development kit installed on it. SilverPush also embeds audio beacon signals into TV commercials which are "picked up silently by an app installed on a [device] (unknown to the user)." The audio beacon enables companies like SilverPush to know which ads the user saw, how long the user watched the ad before changing the channel, which kind of smart devices the individual uses, along with other information that adds to the profile of each user that is linked across devices.

The user is unaware of the audio beacon, but if a smart device has an app on it that uses the SilverPush software development kit, the software on the app will be listening for the audio beacon and once the beacon is detected, devices are immediately recognized as being used by the same individual. SilverPush states that the company is not listening in the background to all of the noises occurring in proximity to the device. The only factor that hinders the receipt of an audio beacon by a device is distance and there is no way for the user to opt-out of this form of cross-device tracking. SilverPush’s company policy is to not "divulge the names of the apps the technology is embedded," meaning that users have no knowledge of which apps are using this technology and no way to opt-out of this practice. As of April of 2015, SilverPush’s software is used by 67 apps and the company monitors 18 million smartphones.

 

Beware of ads that use inaudible sound to link your phone, TV, tablet, and PC

 

This should be a criminal offence, and any company doing this should be shut down, The directors should be jailed.



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#2 PhotoAce

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 10:54 PM

I have the answer for that - my TV set is used to play recorded media only - it isn't plugged into the aerial jack.



#3 rp88

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 01:31 PM

How could the computer "hearing" the noise sent out by the one on which the advert is playing know what to do? I mean shouldn't computers treat things like audio signals they hear as data for storing in files, definitely not as commands to execute? How can computers have been designed so badly that they will execute commands they "hear" through their microphones?



"...by the software development kit ..." Oh, does that mean that this sort of thing only applies if the "hearing" computer has a particular program installed (sounds like adware given it's purpose) on it as well the computer "speaking" having flash and such enabled and always on such that it plays sounds without user approval?

"...names of the apps the technology is embedded..."In that case it could be lurking as a "feature" within any program produced in that last who knwos how many months. How could a user go about detecting and blocking this kind of thing, microphone plugs in the jack sockets with the microphones at the ends cut off?

Edited by rp88, 15 November 2015 - 01:32 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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