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Help with Resume


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#1 Gorbulan

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Posted 09 November 2015 - 04:23 PM

Greetings everyone. Well it is definitely time for me to switch jobs. This is the first computer support job I have had, so it is hard for me to write about in my resume as eloquently as possible. Here it is:

 

·         Assembled, installed, upgraded, and tested Macs, PCs, tablets, printers, and notebooks

·         Troubleshot tablet and desktop computers, including disk imaging, network stress testing, software delivery,

hardware failure, website security certificates, and various software or hardware issues

·         Executed warranty repairs and trouble calls for emergency level issues

·         Supported official school software including ISIS and MSIS, Welligent, and SIS

·         Created backup images for Macintosh and PC desktops

·         Executed malware scans and malware removal on school computers

·         Educated and worked with staff on malicious software, and how to use the Internet safely

·         Tested PC/iPad hardware and software for faculty and student use

·         Created and executed a backup solution for the staff and faculty

·         Worked with instructors and staff to ensure proper file migration across newly purchased hardware

 

That's the section detailing my current job. I don't think it lists every type of thing I did, because it is hard for me to remember them all. I am the one and only "computer guy" at work so my duties include everything except servers.

 

When replying be as brutal and honest as you want. I need a kick ass resume, not a sufficient one! Thanks in advance!!



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 04:41 PM

My advice, pay to have your resume professionally done, if you can afford it.  I paid $300 to the resume service associated with Monster about a decade ago.  Even though I had an administrative background before going into IT they did a bang up job on my resume.  Since then I've only had to keep it up to date.  One of the main things they did was add a keyword section to the top of my resume.  It now looks something like this:

 

Name

Address

Phone • Professional E-mail


IT Analyst

Award-winning computer professional with excellent credentials, experience, and technical skills

Highly trained, award winning, and technically sophisticated IT professional with over fifteen years of experience in network and technical support operations. Firm grasp of connectivity issues, plus hands-on experience with PCs, servers, and other network elements at both hardware and software levels. Creative problem-solver and skilled troubleshooter with proven ability to resolve service issues thoroughly, quickly, and amicably. Strong commitment to customer satisfaction. Highly motivated, dependable, flexible, with an eye towards continual process improvement.  

User Training and Support  /  Technical Support  /  Network Operations and Security

IT Systems Installation  /  Troubleshooting  /  Customer Relations

Technical Proficiencies

Platforms:

Microsoft Windows Vista / 7 / 8, Microsoft Windows Server

Tools:

Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, Visio), AutoCAD, PTC Creo, LabVIEW, MATLAB, SolidWorks, Active Directory, BitLocker, EFS (Encrypted File System), Lotus Notes, Windows Remote Assistance, Windows Remote Desktop Connection Manager, DameWare, SCCM Remote, Checkpoint VPN, TCP/IP, DHCP, DNS, Remedy, X-Formation License Statistics, Marimba, SCCM

Hardware:

Lenovo Desktops and laptops, Dell Desktops and laptops, HP/Compaq Desktops and laptops, Sony Video Surveillance Cameras, HP Servers, HP printers, Ricoh printers, Xerox printers, Avaya IP phones


Edited by Kilroy, 10 November 2015 - 04:42 PM.


#3 Gorbulan

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 07:04 PM

Thanks for the reply! Unfortunately, I can not afford to have my resume did at that price. Hence why I need a new job. ;)

 

The example of your resume is still very helpful, thank you.



#4 dannyboy950

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 07:52 PM

The advice I have is from a couple of personel managers.  Keep it confined to one page.

Mine for awhile looked like a small novel. lol I was trying to cover almost 60 yrs worth of work history.

 

They both said if a resume came across their desk that was more than one page it automatically got filed in file 13.


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#5 Kilroy

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 07:14 AM

If you're in IT I doubt you can keep your resume to one page.  The most important thing is to put the important stuff first.  Just what I posted takes up half a page.  I don't recommend more than two. Have your resume in Word, Text, and PDF.  If you post on the tech sites and get contacted by recruiters, they may ask you to modify your resume, feel free to do it, but keep copies of your old one.

 

You do need to keep your resume current, you'll notice that I don't have Windows 98, 2000, or XP listed.  XP has been retired for over a year now, do you really want it on your resume?  I also don't list all of my experience.  I currently only go back to 1999, mostly because I was with the same company until 2009.



#6 Gorbulan

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 11:50 AM

I always try to keep my resume down to a page. Most people say 1 page no more, others so no more than 2. Nobody has ever said more than two, so I always strive to keep it brief.

 

XP is still a thing in America, at least. A lot of people here like the government and schools still use XP, sadly. So XP needs to be a on a resume, even if it is seems redundant next to 7 or 8+.



#7 Kilroy

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 07:08 AM

XP is still a thing in America, at least. A lot of people here like the government and schools still use XP, sadly. So XP needs to be a on a resume, even if it is seems redundant next to 7 or 8+.

 

Only if you want to work for a company that has failed to upgrade after a product is no longer supported by its manufacturer.  If that's the type of company you want to work for, fine, but understand that if they didn't put the time, money and effort into keeping their systems up to date you're going to be working hard with little or no budget.  That includes the money to pay you.  If a company is still looking for people with XP experience, you don't want to be working for them.



#8 moxom

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 03:16 AM

 

XP is still a thing in America, at least. A lot of people here like the government and schools still use XP, sadly. So XP needs to be a on a resume, even if it is seems redundant next to 7 or 8+.

 

Only if you want to work for a company that has failed to upgrade after a product is no longer supported by its manufacturer.  If that's the type of company you want to work for, fine, but understand that if they didn't put the time, money and effort into keeping their systems up to date you're going to be working hard with little or no budget.  That includes the money to pay you.  If a company is still looking for people with XP experience, you don't want to be working for them.

 

 

I'm working at a school and we have certain applications that just won't run with any other (newer) OS.. I'm not saying it's very important, but it's definitely not something I would take out of the resume.. Companies might not be looking for expertise in XP, but it could be considered a bonus in my opinion.

 

Granted, as BC Advisor stated, our budget is limited, but we have a decent infrastructure and our equipment isn't horribly outdated (except for a few work-arounds as mentioned).



#9 Gorbulan

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 11:41 AM

moxom and I are in the same boat. I work for a school that still uses Windows XP here and there. They are removing it slowly, but are still dependent on it. The old student database which was upgraded last year still uses a DOS interface, some offices are still using DOS technically. The other day I replaced a computer because the very used WinXP machine died.



#10 Kilroy

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 06:59 AM

I work for a school that still uses Windows XP here and there.

 

And how would you rate your compensation and money available for keeping things running and purchasing new equipment?  While your infrastructure may be decent now, what about five years from now?  What happens when equipment fails unexpectedly? 

 

That is my main point about a company that is still looking for XP support, running an outdated operating system is normally an indicator that money is an issue.  While money shouldn't be the most important consideration in accepting a position.



#11 Gorbulan

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Posted 18 November 2015 - 11:44 AM

 

I work for a school that still uses Windows XP here and there.

 

And how would you rate your compensation and money available for keeping things running and purchasing new equipment?  While your infrastructure may be decent now, what about five years from now?  What happens when equipment fails unexpectedly? 

 

That is my main point about a company that is still looking for XP support, running an outdated operating system is normally an indicator that money is an issue.  While money shouldn't be the most important consideration in accepting a position.

 

 

Businesses yes, governments no. I believe the US gov still has a contract with MS to keep XP updated. So if one is applying to anything government, state or federal, then it helps to have XP experience.

 

I would not apply to a business that still used Windows XP, as you said, it is a definitive indicator of budget.






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