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A general question concerning personal computer security


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#1 Mannclann

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Posted 01 November 2015 - 04:46 PM

A friend and I were recently having a discussion concerning the security of our home computers. I am not a conspiracy theorist but I do believe in my own privacy, not because I have something to hide but because it is no one's business what I do or where I go online. My friend feels like security is not that important on your own home computers because no one really wants anything that the average person has to offer. I countered with the fact that most people are lax with passwords and many people do banking and other financial transactions online and all that is at risk without proper precautions.

 

No matter what I had to say he wasn't really to concerned. He has antivirus, and that's about it. I told him he needed to be far more concerned than he is.

 

I would love to know what a community like this thinks about the conversation and perhaps what personal computer security you think should be had by everyone, at a minimum.



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#2 dannyboy950

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Posted 01 November 2015 - 05:09 PM

He is one of those low hanging fruits that the bad guys thrive on.
If good security practices were used by the majority of users the bad guys would have to work a lot harder.

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#3 quietman7

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Posted 01 November 2015 - 07:07 PM

Your friend is providing bad advice.

The user is the first and last line of defense. Unfortunately, it as been proven time and again that the user is a more substantial factor (weakest link) in security than the architecture of the operating system or installed protection software.No amount of security software is going to defend against today's sophisticated malware writers for those who do not practice safe computing and stay informed. Knowledge and the ability to use it is the best defensive tool anyone can have.

Security begins with personal responsibility and following Best Practices for Safe Computing.

The end user needs to constantly educate themselves which includes staying informed about the latest malware threats and those recommendations by security experts on how to protect themselves.
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#4 irvin_than_allyl

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 03:56 AM

A friend and I were recently having a discussion concerning the security of our home computers. I am not a conspiracy theorist but I do believe in my own privacy, not because I have something to hide but because it is no one's business what I do or where I go online. My friend feels like security is not that important on your own home computers because no one really wants anything that the average person has to offer. I countered with the fact that most people are lax with passwords and many people do banking and other financial transactions online and all that is at risk without proper precautions.

 

No matter what I had to say he wasn't really to concerned. He has antivirus, and that's about it. I told him he needed to be far more concerned than he is.

 

I would love to know what a community like this thinks about the conversation and perhaps what personal computer security you think should be had by everyone, at a minimum.

 

I side with you on the issue. I don't have a lot of time right now to make a long post, and I'm not quite in a ranting mood at this time, so I'm not going to get into government and corporate surveillance, which is one of the biggest problems the world faces. I'm also not going to get into the debate of open source software vs. closed source software, of which I am staunchly on the side of open source.

 

The only thing I will say in general about security is that it requires a layered approach, and being secure, or as secure as possible in computing data, retreiving or transmiting data, or storing data shouldn't be a goal, it should be a habit.

 

That said, in regards to computer security and what everyone should have, minimum.

 

A tiny morsel of CONCERN. It would go a long way if everyone that used a computer or smartphone had even a tiny amount of concern for security. People aren't going to take steps to improve their security if they don't care at all about it and are wholly apathetic.


Edited by irvin_than_allyl, 05 November 2015 - 03:57 AM.


#5 Didier Stevens

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:00 AM

My friend feels like security is not that important on your own home computers because no one really wants anything that the average person has to offer.

 

This is not the case with ransomware. Criminals are interested in the average computer. Ransomware is one example, a botnet is another example.


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