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external HD not spinning up/not being recognized


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#1 e_dante1

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 06:38 PM

I hope someone can help!  I have an HP 2000 Notebook running Windows 10, and an ancient Seagate Barracuda 500GB external HD. Everything was great until 2 days ago, when the Seagate suddenly didn't show up.  I powered it down, plugged it back in. Nothing.  That's when I noticed the sound.  The drive wasn't spinning up, and there was a tick, tick, tick sound, almost like a stop watch.  After about a minute, the drive started to spin, but the speed wasn't right - too slow.  It still wasn't being recognized and it was still ticking.

 

what I've tried....

 

I popped it into a ziplock bag and put it in the freezer for an hour or so.  Nothing.

I "gently" tapped the case, hoping the motor was stuck.  Nothing.

I rebooted the laptop, thinking maybe I'd get lucky and it would miraculously fix itself.  Nothing.

 

So.... I broke the cardinal run!  I cracked the case!  With the case open, I plugged the drive in and watched.  The ticking sound started immediately, but the platters were not spinning. I also noticed that the head arms were all the way to the center of the platters.  After a minute of so, I noticed the platters move about a millimeter, stop, move again, stop, etc.  After about 2 minutes, the platters started spinning, but not as fast as I think they should have been. The head arms never moved.  I checked, and the head arms didn't seem to be impeding the platters at all.  As a matter of fact, I could move them quite easily manually.

 

So, I have 3 ideas as to what could be wrong: fried power resistor on the PCB; bad motor; or dead head.  Of course, I know next to nothing about this, so I'm hoping someone can tell me its a simple fix, and all of my data will be accessible again in a few minutes....



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#2 saw101

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 07:45 PM

Hard drives are sealed tight for a reason. The likely hood that even after trouble shooting, repairing & put back together your chances that data is recoverable is near Zero.

 

Read this 2 page article: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/133294-raising-the-dead-can-a-regular-person-repair-a-damaged-hard-drive


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#3 e_dante1

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 11:02 PM

Hi Saw101.  Thanks for the reply.  I read the article, and it didn't tell me anything, nor answer my question.  (BTW - I should probably mention that I was fully aware that opening the case risked damaging data on the drive.  I DID say I broke the cardinal rule, after all.).  The real question is what failed on the drive?  Oh, and it wasn't a resistor on the PCB - I put a meter on them, and they both tested fine.  My money is still on the motor or the head.



#4 saw101

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 12:04 AM

 

My money is still on the motor or the head.

 

Well considering all that can fail, motor & head are probably common failures. I've never ever had any luck with the freezer method or gently tapping on the drive. When drives I've owned have failed, I've opened them up to retrieve the rare earth magnets out of them. Some people have, with a bit of work, turned them into rather nifty desk clocks. Here's one....http://www.instructables.com/id/Recycled-Hard-Drive-Desk-Clock/  Beats tossing it into recycling or trash.   


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#5 Havachat

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 12:10 AM

Id see if you can turn the Platters manually from the centre hub area ..slowly .

Ensure the Arm is also Parked correctly - turn platters while doing so.

Check the power source to the Drive is correct voltage.

Swap out PCB if you have a spare to test.

 

Ive had good success with retrieving data from faulty drives and then turfing them , but out of about 30  - 2 were just dead and not worth the effort.

Depends how important the data is and cost to retrieve can be high , thats why i say Backup Backup and Backup.



#6 Havachat

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 12:16 AM

 

 

My money is still on the motor or the head.

 

Well considering all that can fail, motor & head are probably common failures. I've never ever had any luck with the freezer method or gently tapping on the drive. When drives I've owned have failed, I've opened them up to retrieve the rare earth magnets out of them. Some people have, with a bit of work, turned them into rather nifty desk clocks. Here's one....http://www.instructables.com/id/Recycled-Hard-Drive-Desk-Clock/  Beats tossing it into recycling or trash.   

 

Nice Clock , got a few laying around , will give it a try , never thought in to it , might add hinges and have as a Table Clock on work bench.



#7 saw101

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 01:06 AM

 

Nice Clock , got a few laying around , will give it a try , never thought in to it , might add hinges and have as a Table Clock on work bench.

 

Well, if you manage to knock one out, post the pics. Google has a lot of clock hard drive pics. https://www.google.com/search?q=hard+drive+clocks&num=30&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CDAQsARqFQoTCL3E1Oj53MgCFRbYYwodC0AP6w&biw=1680&bih=895


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#8 e_dante1

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Posted 26 October 2015 - 05:48 PM

Id see if you can turn the Platters manually from the centre hub area ..slowly .

Ensure the Arm is also Parked correctly - turn platters while doing so.

Check the power source to the Drive is correct voltage.

Swap out PCB if you have a spare to test.

 

Ive had good success with retrieving data from faulty drives and then turfing them , but out of about 30  - 2 were just dead and not worth the effort.

Depends how important the data is and cost to retrieve can be high , thats why i say Backup Backup and Backup.

Hi Havachat.

 

Since my last post, I've been messing around with the drive a little.  The platters will spin freely if I give them a little assist to get started.  The head arms will occasionally twitch and cause a beeping/ticking sound (one beep with each twitch), but they aren't scratching the platters as far as I can tell.  I have switched out the power cable and tested it.  Nothing new.  My other Seagate drive has a different PCB, which doesn't fit, so luck on testing it.



#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 26 October 2015 - 06:31 PM

Just some info. On modern drives even if you had a duplicate PCB it would not work unless you also transferred the firmware.

 

http://www.hdd-parts.com/take-photos.html



#10 Notorious

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Posted 28 October 2015 - 08:05 AM

Opening drive wasn't a smart move.

Seagate and Maxtor drives were notorious for their LBA and BSY errors. I don't know what model you have but I had something similar few years back. I'll copy/paste little tutorial I posted on another forum. Since you don't have much to lose now, it's worth while to go try to fix your drive.

What I did was this;

 

 

For folx among us who are stuck with dead hard disk, this is probably the only option to save data and lot of money in case you had something valuable on your drive.

So, what is the 0 LBA and BSY error? Well, 0 LBA error happens when your BIOS won't recognize your HDD at POST and sees your disk as an 0MB drive.
BSY error is when your HDD enter a halt state, or BuSY state. When this happens, your drive won't be recognized by BIOS at POST moment because your SATA port is locked up.

So.. What now?
You'll need the will and courage to go trough few steps that sound more complicated then they are. Still you'll need to focus on what you're doing because it is easy to make mistake.


What do we need?
First, we'll need computer with terminal software like HyperTerminal or Realterm.. If you use Win.XP, it's already there. I'll get to this later.
Next, one TTL adapter I'm using Phox.de for Siemens C/S/M-35/SL45 because I already had one at home, but you can also use Nokia CA-42 or DKU-5 Cable.
It cost only few bucks and saves you trouble of adding extra power supply if you would use RS232 to TTL adapter for example..

Now we have to find out what are the RX, TX and ground connections on CA-42. You'll have to solder and isolate connectors to hook up the drive to adapter. I'm handy with electronica so I used connectors from one old ATA HD cable. Those fit perfectly and won't flop out in middle of operation.

Now you'll need to configure HyperTerminal.

Open Hyperterminal,and choose the COM port that your cable is using. If you are unsure of which COM port to use, check your device manager (look in the "ports" sub-section) to see which COM port your cable is using.


In Port Settings fill this values:
Bits per second : 38400
Data bits : 8
Parity : None
Stop bits : 1
Row control : None
Hit OK

When this is done, go play with terminal software to find out if everything works as it should.
Short RX and TX pin of your adapter to see if you can type anything in terminal software. If so, you are ready to go, but before that you need to remove the Printed Circuit Board from HDD case and isolate PCB circuit board with piece of paper between PCB and hard drive where the other connector is, but leave the motor contacts connected. Fasten PCB with two screws next to motor connector.

Now you need to hook up the dead drive to CA-42 adapter connections you just made.

From PC (TX) to -> HD RX
From PC (RX) to -> HD TX
Ground connection to HD

If your system cannot talk with HDD switch Tx with Rx lines.

If everything works, plug the SATA power cable into the drive, and wait until drive motor stops.

*****Note that all characters are case sensitive*****

Type CTRL+Z and you should see a prompt like this F3 T>
F3 T> Type /2 and press (enter). It should say F3 2>
F3 2> Type Z (enter)

Now you'll see something like that;
Spin Down Complete
Elapsed Time 0.137 msecs (the time won't be same as here)F3 2>

Now carefull remove piece of paper with drive still powered by SATA power cable and TX/RX lies connected.
Carefully screw PCB board back on HDD case. (make sure that the screws don't short the PCB board)
To start the motor, type U
F3 2>U (enter)

Now it should look something like this:
Spin Up Complete
Elapsed Time 7.129secs

To go to Level 1 type /1 and hit enter
F3 2>/1

Create S.M.A.R.T. sector
Type N1 (enter)


IMPORTANT Power off the drive, wait 10 seconds and now Power ON your drive.

Press CTRL+Z on terminal and type:(case sensitive!!!!)

F3 T>m0,2,2,,,,,22 (enter)

After 15-30 seconds, you should see something like:

Max Wr Retries = 00, Max Rd Retries = 00, Max ECC T-Level = 14, Max Certify Rewrite Retries = 00C8
User Partition Format 6% complete, Zone 00, Pass 00, LBA 00008DED, ErrCode 00000080, Elapsed Time 0 mins 05 secs
User Partition Format Successful - Elapsed Time 0 mins 05 secs
And should bring you back to the F3 T> Prompt.


Now you can unplug everything, turn off computer and re-install your drive.. Should be working fine now..
Update your drive with the latest firmware as soon as possible.
If there seem to be interest to this topic,I will post some pics to simplify things a little.

About HyperTerminal
If you wish to use original XP HyperTerminal on Win 7 machine, you need to copy hypertrm.dll and hypertrm.exe from XP computer. To find hypertrm.exe go to C:\Program Files\Windows NT and hypertrm.dll in C:\Windows\System32.
You can park them in any directory, but to do it neatly I put it in Communications folder where it should be.

You can use Realterm instead if you wish.. Great little program http://realterm.sourceforge.net/

 

********************************************************************

Hope this will help you.. :)


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