Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Will Office Pro 2000 work with Windows 10.1?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 harryhh

harryhh

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Princeton, ILL
  • Local time:10:29 AM

Posted 23 October 2015 - 02:51 PM

Windows 7 HP 64 bit    Thinking of upgrading to Windows 10.1

 

Windows Office Pro 2000 is one of the oldest programs on my computer.

 

I ran the Win 8.1 Upgrade Assistant to check which of my apps will run with Win 10.1. ( there doesn't seem to be an assistant for win 10.1) For 'Windows Office Professional 2000' and 'Windows Office 2000 disc 2' it gives a yellow caution icon and says 'paid update available'. I only use Word and Excel. They do what I want and I really don't want to be paying much for new versions. Office Home and Student is about $150. That's about twice what I would want to pay for a disk version.

 

I have read that older Office versions can be ran in compatibility mode on Windows 10.1

 

I have read that Office has always been compatible with new versions of Windows.

 

What do you folks think? Will I be able to run Office 2000 on Windows 10.1?

 

Thanks,

Harry

 


Can't keep up with the computer stuff anymore. It's getting beyond me.  :mellow:


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,852 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:11:29 AM

Posted 23 October 2015 - 03:50 PM

All files generated by prior versions of Office have been, up to this date and time, readable by later versions of office.

 

You have a version of Office that's so old (we're talking a pre-XP release here) I would never rely upon it to be compatible.  If all you're using is Word and Excel and you'd prefer not to have to pay for upgrades, what I'd suggest is trying either LibreOffice or OpenOffice.  Either one is capable of opening word processing documents and spreadsheets not only from every version of MS-Office I'm aware of but also other niche and defunct products, too.

 

There comes a time when you either bite the bullet and upgrade or bite the bullet and switch to something else and endure the learning curve with either decision.  In my opinion you're waaaaaaay past the reasonable point for doing one of those two things.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#3 brainout

brainout

  • Members
  • 1,190 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston
  • Local time:09:29 AM

Posted 23 October 2015 - 05:31 PM

harryhh, sorry that some of the BC members have a need to deprecate your software instead of just answering your question.  So here's the answer: Office 2000 will work in Win10, but Outlook email will have problems. It also works in Win8. 

 

Just don't have it on your machine until after Win10 is installed.  But I won't use Win10 anymore, so I can't vouch for whether it will work post the many unknown unpredictable and likely borking updates which will come forceably in the future.  For the new Windows won't allow you to choose among updates, you have to accept what they send you.

 

However, I switched over to Office 2003;  it's just like 2000 in structure, macros, add-ins; but adds some useful features, like the ability to insert digital signatures, so I installed it on my Win10 until I stopped using it.  You can get really cheap upgrades to 2003 which allow you to keep your existing 2000 alongside or to replace it, from Amazon.  I think the prices are something like $20, retail copy.

 

So whatever macros, etc. you have in 2000, will work in 2003.  Or should.  And even though updates have stopped for 2003, you can get them in Win10.  Outlook 2003 won't do email rightly, just as Outlook 2000.  Both need XP to do email rightly.  Win7 took that ability away.  Later Windows won't return it.

 

So maybe stay on WinXP.


Edited by brainout, 23 October 2015 - 05:35 PM.

(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net


#4 harryhh

harryhh
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Princeton, ILL
  • Local time:10:29 AM

Posted 23 October 2015 - 07:17 PM

Thank you for the two answers above. Both have useful information.

 

Glad to hear that Office 2000 should work on Win 10.

 

I just read that the next major update to win 10 will be in November. I will wait until then to upgrade. Should my Office 2000 not work, I will make sure that 2003 will, and go for that.

 

Thanks folks,

Harry


Can't keep up with the computer stuff anymore. It's getting beyond me.  :mellow:


#5 lplateuser

lplateuser

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southampton, UK
  • Local time:03:29 PM

Posted 07 December 2015 - 12:21 PM

I used a free upgrade to WIN 10 1st December. I can't remember how old my Office 2003 is, but it has gone from XP to WIN 7 to WIN8.1 to WIN 10 with no problems at all. Like you, I can do all I need with 2003 so can't see a reason for paying large amounts for new versions and then going through a learning curve. In general I like WIN 10, and I am finding it fairly easy to adapt to. I am looking for a media app to replace Windows Media although my old version has come through the upgrade intact. Unfortunately the best alternative is now only available though the microsoft store and I hate using this. LibreOffice is not too hard to learn if your Office 2000 doesn't work. IMPORTANT. when you install Windows 10 remember to turn off all the impertinent spying defaults MS want you to accept.

#6 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 22,634 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:29 AM

Posted 07 December 2015 - 12:34 PM

I can't say for sure but aren't there security issues that have been patched in later versions in Office that have not in 2000? If you are doing basic work processing, spreadsheets, and no large database work then use Libre Office, or one of the other good free office suites like Kingsoft Office or Softmaker Free Office which has very good compatibility with Microsoft Office. I would not go out and purchase Microsoft Office if you only have basic word processing and spreadsheet needs.


Edited by JohnC_21, 07 December 2015 - 12:34 PM.


#7 harryhh

harryhh
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Princeton, ILL
  • Local time:10:29 AM

Posted 07 December 2015 - 03:42 PM

I installed Windows 10 about a month ago and the few parts of Office 2000 that I use seem to be working fine. All my older stuff on there is still usable. Now, I really only use Word for typing-up some stuff once in a while, or copying and pasting some info. I use Excel to keep track of my gas mileage on my car.

 

I hadn't thought about security issues of the older Office. I can only think of one thing I've ever written on Word that I would consider private or personal, and it's still on there.

 

Thanks for the reminder of some of the free stuff out there.

 

 

Different topic ~

 

But, after installing Windows 10 I began to notice that it wanted and kept track of a lot of personal information on people. After partially setting up Cortana I tried to disable it, but found that it is still running in the background. Apparently, on installing Windows 10, you also automatically give it permission to read and report your emails. Upon partially setting up the Calendar feature where it wanted my email address and password, I have now given Windows 10 the ability to read my google account emails.

 

I did a quick google on Windows 10 invasion of privacy and this is the first thing that popped up:

https://www.hackread.com/windows-10-is-spying-on-you/

 

If web address's aren't allowed it's,

Windows 10 is spying on you, but there’s a way out   By on

Can't keep up with the computer stuff anymore. It's getting beyond me.  :mellow:


#8 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,852 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:11:29 AM

Posted 07 December 2015 - 07:46 PM

Yes, there is a way out, at least partially.  I've also grown tired of the use of the word "spying" because the user agreements for the various services and the OS itself make very clear what they collect of a personal nature and how it can be shared.

 

First, though, you need to understand that there is a difference between the Cortana Service (what one might think of as your friendly electronic personal assistant) and the Cortana process, which is used as part of the Windows 10 Search Function.  You will always have a Cortana process running, but it's the Cortana and Search Settings, along with Speech, Inking, & Typing that control the Cortana Service and the majority of personal data collection..  Make your Cortana and Search Settings look like this (and if you prefer turn off Device Search history, though this is local):

 

Attached File  2015-12-03_Cortana.jpg   59.8KB   2 downloads

 

If you've been using the Cortana Service make sure to follow the link, "Manage what Cortana knows about me in the cloud," if you wish to clear the information held by Microsoft.

 

Then, go to Privacy settings, paying particular attention to the Speech, Inking & Typing settings, ensuring that "Get to know me" is not on.  If you wish follow the link, "Go to Bing and manage personal information on all devices."  You should go through each and every setting related to privacy to make sure things are set on or off as you want them to be.

 

Delete all accounts from the Windows 10 Mail App. If you have OneDrive active then reset its settings so that it doesn't automatically start with Windows.  If you are using any of the Services listed in the Microsoft Services Agreement you'll need to cease using those, too, if you want to restrict what Microsoft can collect as much as possible.

 

Most of the personal data collection related to Windows 10 is directly connected to the use of the services listed in the Microsoft Services Agreement.  If you consider the collection of system information and performance of your hardware and peripherals to be unacceptable then you'll need to find something other than Windows, and even other OSes employ this sort of telemetry, but not as much of it as Windows 10 currently does.

 

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users