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Upgrade Dell 3847


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#1 mrsodell1980

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:49 AM

I bought this computer for my teenaged son for Christmas last year. He plays WoW, Minecraft, and a couple others I can't think of right now. I think WoW is the most demanding to his computer though. For his birthday this year, I want to do some upgrades for him. What can I do, what will make a difference, where can I start? I don't want to spend a ton of money, but I want the difference to be noticeable, if that makes sense.
I'm not sure what info you need, but hopefully this helps:

Dell Inspirion 3847
Intel Core i5 4460 CPU @ 3.2 GHz
RAM 8GB
64 bit
Windows 10 Home

Thank you in advance!



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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 07:25 AM

There are couple things you can do to make the computer seem a little faster.

 

SSD - Determine how much space you need before buying one.  SSD's are very fast and most people put the operating system and their games/applications on it for quick loading.  I use the Crucial BX100 2.5" 500GB SATA III to store my games and you can get them up to 1TB in size.  There are other brands worth considering, like Samsung and Intel.  You may need an adapter or bracket for your PC case to convert the 3.5 inch slot to a 2.5 inch one for the SSD, the Rosewill RXC200M or something like it would be good.  Once you get it, move the OS and games onto the SSD and leave the traditional platter-based hard drive you have now for media, like music, movies, pictures, etc.

 

GPU/PSU - You could also get a new graphics card with a new power supply, but I doubt this minitower case could easily accommodate one.  If you go this route a 500W Corsair power supply with an Nvidia GTX 950 graphics card, or a 960 if you can get a good deal, would be the level you would want to aim for

 

I would go with an SSD, especially if your son is happy with the performance as it is now once he is in a game.  The SSD will affect almost everything loaded onto the drive, so non-gaming activities will benefit.


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#3 mrsodell1980

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:27 PM

There are couple things you can do to make the computer seem a little faster.
 
SSD - Determine how much space you need before buying one.  SSD's are very fast and most people put the operating system and their games/applications on it for quick loading.  I use the Crucial BX100 2.5" 500GB SATA III to store my games and you can get them up to 1TB in size.  There are other brands worth considering, like Samsung and Intel.  You may need an adapter or bracket for your PC case to convert the 3.5 inch slot to a 2.5 inch one for the SSD, the Rosewill RXC200M or something like it would be good.  Once you get it, move the OS and games onto the SSD and leave the traditional platter-based hard drive you have now for media, like music, movies, pictures, etc.
 
GPU/PSU - You could also get a new graphics card with a new power supply, but I doubt this minitower case could easily accommodate one.  If you go this route a 500W Corsair power supply with an Nvidia GTX 950 graphics card, or a 960 if you can get a good deal, would be the level you would want to aim for
 
I would go with an SSD, especially if your son is happy with the performance as it is now once he is in a game.  The SSD will affect almost everything loaded onto the drive, so non-gaming activities will benefit.


Thank you so much! This is what we will do, start with the SSD and then possible the video card. Is it doable to transfer the operating system and such to the SSD? Do you have a thread you recommend that will guide me in that process? If not, it's ok, I can Google :)

Thank you again!!



#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 07:16 AM

Some SSD makers have migration software in the box it comes in.  This can be used to facilitate the transfer.  However, I suggest reading articles on how to do this before moving stuff over, just so you're familiar with what is going to happen and why.  Alternatively, you can unplug your current hard drive, plug in the SSD, install Windows onto the SSD, then plug back in your old drive to copy data off it.  This "Fresh install" method is the cleanest and least error prone, but can be a hassle since you have to reinstall all your applications.

 

Here are some resources to get you started.

 

SSD Migration or Fresh System Installation – An SSD Primer

How To Migrate Windows 7 to a Solid State Drive

Windows 10 Forums - How do I move my operating system to a SSD


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