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Anyone have a good tutorial for setting up S.M.A.R.T Alarms in Windows ?


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#1 mikeloeven

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 08:00 AM

The thing i have learned from using speed fan and other HDD Monitoring tools is that for some reason windows does not have proper notification settings when SMART thresholds are exceeded and at this point i am looking for a good tutorial for setting up real time monitoring and notification so that i dont have to keep running self tests at regular intervals but rather set it up to run automatically and than warn me if a SMART Test fails



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#2 technonymous

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 11:56 PM

There really is no need to have real-time monitoring or keep doing checks. Once you enable those things in the bios it will let you know if there is critical errors or something is wrong. It will flash a warning on the screen.



#3 mikeloeven

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 06:20 AM

This is simply not true my computer had been acting wonky for over a month before i found out that one of the drives had a bad sector so obviously the bios's integrated smart monitoring is not accurate enough or windows is not displaying the errors as they occur. plus i would prefer to be notified of a prefail state using manually configured thresholds rather than wait for a disk to simply drop or develop bad sectors.

 

it has to do mostly with maintaining the integrity of my backups that drive with the bad sectors had been backed multiple times since the issue developed and neither the system or the backup software detected the corruption which is troubling because i can only store a limited number of backup chains for each disk and if a damaged drive is backed up and overwrites a known good image this can result in permanent data loss


Edited by mikeloeven, 22 October 2015 - 06:28 AM.


#4 technonymous

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 07:46 AM

Hard drives start to degrade the minute that you start using them. SMART enabled in the bios is just for HD on the verge of death. There are SMART tools that will give more details. Depends on how robust the software is if it logs,reports alerts to you of what it finds. Same with backup software. I agree if you are backing up errors over good data then yeah that's a problem. What type of backup solution are you using hardware and software? It's best to have atleast 2 or 3 images on seperate drives and one tucked away. A bad sector that holds system data gets corrupt yeah your system is going to run wonky. Only thing you can do is try to repair the sector. Some cases you can't and those sectors data cannot be moved and you have to completely reformat the drive and put the image back on it. Usually any sign of errors people will junk them and get a new one. It's just the nature of the beast HD's and SSD die eventually.

 

 

Edit: If this a continuing thing, heat inside a system can contribute to HD's failing a lot. I would say keeping them in the 40's range is ideal. Also moisture high humidity or very cold rooms can cause moisture and hd failures. Living near the coastline. Sea air increases electronic failure.


Edited by technonymous, 22 October 2015 - 07:51 AM.





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