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Computer constantly resets on startup


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#1 melmonella

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 07:19 AM

About two weeks ago I restarted my PC, but it didn't switch on. Fans spun for two seconds or so, then everything switched off. After a couple of seconds fans started spinning again, and, again, everything shut down after another couple of seconds. This cycle continued until I forcibly turned it off(with the power supply switch) There was no POST beep code at any time.

Next morning I reseated memory sticks and some connections inside the case, and tried booting with just one memory stick. Everything worked fine from the first try. I shrugged, put the second stick inside, booted and continued working. I often leave PC running over night, so I turned it off only after a few days. Same problem. Since I was about to leave town, I didn't do anything about the problem at the time. A week later, when I returned, I somehow got it working again by reseating everything, but couldn't figure out what was the problem. And finally, yesterday it happened for the third time. I got it working again(again, don't know what I did exactly that helped), but this time I want it gone for good.

Here is what I know about the problem:

  • It isn't related to memory, hard drives, graphics card or CD/DVD drive, or at least isn't exclusively related to them:it persists if I try to boot without them(no error beep code when booting, constant reboots every couple of seconds)
  • It is probably either related to capacitors, batteries or something that would heat up, though the latter seems unlikely: during the first "boot attempt" after turning the PC on fans spin for longer(3-4 times sometimes) than during later "boot attempts". That could be explained by either something (capacitor, battery) being empty at first and then charging up, with a crash after it is full, or it being full and discharging, with the crash when it is empty. Later "boots" are shorter since it is either almost empty or almost full alredy, respectively.
  • it probably isn't related to anything that is used while PC is working, since if the launch goes through, everything seems to work fine.
  • I did everything in this checklist, except for checking out PSU since it sounds quite dangerous. http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/faq/id-1893016/post-system-boot-video-output-troubleshooting-checklist.html Nothing solved the problem. 
  • this build worked with no significant problems for more than a year. GPU, memory, motherboard, CPU, CPU's fan, one case fan and one of the hard drives are one year old. Second hard drive, PSU and second case fan are 3 years old.
  • all three times that it booted sucessfully I haven't attempted to boot it for hours before, and I think that problems happened when I tried to boot shortly after another boot attempt, or after turning PC off. Perhaps something(capacitor/battery/something else) that is causing the problem is draining very slowly?
  • My build: memory 2x KINGSTON KHX2133C11D3/8GX, GPU Nvidia 660Ti , Proc intel i7 2600K, PSU FSP550-80GLN, Motherboard P8Z77-V PRO, system Windows 7 Pro. I don't know how to find out exact models of everything else, but as I have written before, it shouldn't matter.

So, why is my PC constantly resetting, is something wrong with my PSU and if it is why is it only wrong during launch?



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#2 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 06:48 AM

I would look for blown capacitors on the motherboard and go from there.

Edited by Captain_Chicken, 13 November 2015 - 05:45 PM.

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#3 ranchhand_

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 04:43 PM

Try Captain's advice above, if you don't know how to spot bad caps post back.

 

This in your post caught my attention especially:
 

 

There was no POST beep code at any time.

Failure to achieve POST is indicative of a low-level hardware failure; that means that the signal from the power supply is not reaching the BIOS in order to load the keyboard and signal to the CPU and hard drive. You may have a motherboard starting to fail. There is no direct way of testing a mainboard (mobo) except by testing the other components 1x1 until only the mobo is left. We can do that if you want, it involves some work and patience but I will walk you through it if you are interested.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#4 melmonella

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 06:59 AM

Try Captain's advice above, if you don't know how to spot bad caps post back.

 

This in your post caught my attention especially:
 

 

There was no POST beep code at any time.

Failure to achieve POST is indicative of a low-level hardware failure; that means that the signal from the power supply is not reaching the BIOS in order to load the keyboard and signal to the CPU and hard drive. You may have a motherboard starting to fail. There is no direct way of testing a mainboard (mobo) except by testing the other components 1x1 until only the mobo is left. We can do that if you want, it involves some work and patience but I will walk you through it if you are interested.

Huh, someone actually answered this thread. Since I needed to use my PC and had no idea how to solve the problem at the time, I bought a new PSU(it was one of the two possible failure points in the system, and it was 3 years old). Problems almost stopped. Now it boots just fine, so I think this problem is solved. My best guess is that there wasn't enough voltage on the line that sends the signal for the rest of the system to turn on.

>Problems almost stopped.

For some reason it no longer shuts down normally after I click "Shut down" in windows, and instead keeps the fans running indefinitely after Windows is switched off(or, at least, up until I force it to shut down by holding the power button for 5 seconds). It doesn't seem like an urgent problem though.



#5 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 11:07 AM

Were all the caps ok?

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#6 dc3

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 11:21 AM

Doing a hard shut down can damage files which are still running.

 

If changing out the PSU resolved the original problem you may now have a software problem.

 

 
 
Please run System File Checker
 
The sfc /scannow command scans all protected system files and replaces corrupted and incorrect versions with correct Microsoft versions.
 
Click on the Start orb rsz_1rsz_1rsz_start_orb_zpshjewtibd.png and then type cmd in the Search programs and files box.
 
In the pane above the search box Programs will appear with cmd below it, right click on cmd and select Run as administrator.
 
If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, enter the password, or click Allow.
 
This will open the Elevated Command Prompt, it will look similar to the image below.
 
command%20prompt%20w8_zpsxjmewau9.png
 
Copy and paste sfc /scannow in the command prompt, then press Enter to start the scan.  
 
If the scan finds no integrity  problems the scan will stop.  Type in exit, then press Enter to stop the scan.
 
When the scan is finished and if intergrity issues are found, please do the following.
 
Click on the Start orb rsz_1rsz_1rsz_start_orb_zpshjewtibd.png then copy and paste the following in the Search programs and files box.
 
findstr /c:"[SR]" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log >"%userprofile%\Desktop\sfcdetails.txt"
 
This will place a new icon on the desktop titled sfcdetails.  Double click on this icon to  
the CBS log, copy and paste the log in your topic.
 
If this fails to place the icon on your desktop run the command from the Command Prompt.  Use the instructions I provided at the start of this tutorial.
 
This log may be very large, if you have problems posting it try breaking it into smaller parts.  When you copy these parts you will highlight the section you are going to copy.  If you leave that section highlighted it will give you a quick reference for where you left off.  Do not use a host website to post this.  I will not download anything to my computer unless I know exactly what it contains.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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