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My first build, a few questions


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#1 sanpt7777

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 03:41 PM

Hey guys, I'm a regular reader here on BC and I'm saving up for my first build. I hate pointless threads as much as the next guy but hear me out. I've been reading a lot of guides on how to build a computer and there are things that I don't see get mentioned, I also need some things dumbed out TBH because I just am not experienced. I'll proceed to ask my questions, but first I want to let you know (in a 1 to 5 scale) what use I'll give the PC:

 

-Internet (5): Forum browsing, facebook, downloading stuff, a lot of Youtube and a lot of Netflix.

-Data Storage (3): iPhone photographs, wallpapers, camera, downloads, memes :D   I don't often store video, but I do keep lots of music because I always buy records (physical) even if all I want to hear is one song xD

-Gaming (5): I'm giving this a top priority because, even though I don't play that much on PC, I feel like part of the reason is not having a good system to play in the first place.

-CAD software (2): I'll be applying for engineering next year. I won't do much at first but I've been told later it will be a LOT of cad work.

 

The thing here is that I want a computer that is overbuilt for my needs. There's nothing more infuriating than a slow computer that crashes with 3 browser tabs. I want to have a computer that is adequate-good at everything and will stay up to date for a couple of years, even if it doesn't excel at something in particular.

 

I read a lot of guides but they never say where can I cut corners, that's not my style but if it's possible, that would be good.

I'm guessing I should look for a good case for starters, because that will be kind of permanent and won't need upgrading, so where else should I focus my attention?

 

I can either build a budget PC or buy components one at a time, but instead of cheaping out buying the best I can. Example: This week I buy a good RAM, next week I'll get a good motherboard and if next month I have some money maybe I can buy a nice case.

 

Which creates another question: Am I good on my notion that if I'm buying one part at a time, I'm better of following the order in which they'll be installed? I'm a n00b so taking my time building the PC is better, even though I've seen pros can build a PC in a couple of hours.

 

Last but not least. I have a computer that broke doen, like a year ago I was curious and took it apart to see the insides --sorry I'm just like that :( --

It's from 2009 I think but surely I can scavenge some stuff from there? Card reader, HDD, DVD and what not.

 

Thanks a lot guys, I'll appreciate your time and advice



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#2 sanpt7777

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 04:43 PM

I'm considering buying a SSD for software and keep the 320GB from the old Acer I had as storage for the things I mentioned


Edited by sanpt7777, 12 October 2015 - 04:43 PM.


#3 SEANIA

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 04:59 AM

It's not exactly clear what you're asking. I'll try to pick out the questions you did ask the best I can, but you need to follow up with what your main point is. If it's a build you're asking for, then could you give a estimated budget? I know you kinda inferred "however much it costs to make it do this. plus some overkill", but some frame for the budget would be nice.

 

 

Which creates another question: Am I good on my notion that if I'm buying one part at a time, I'm better of following the order in which they'll be installed? I'm a n00b so taking my time building the PC is better, even though I've seen pros can build a PC in a couple of hours.

You can buy it in part over time, but it's not dependent on install order (you can just leave them in their boxes till it's time to build). Instead you buy in order of how fast parts age. So case is a case is a case since case formats rarely change. Order is something like.

Case

Case fans (if not already included in case)

Power Supply

RAM

HardDrive

Motherboard+CPU (need to be bought at same time)

CPU cooler (if needed/wanted in the first place)

Graphics Card (these advance the fastest)

 

 Downside to buying in parts is you don't know if any of the parts were dead on arrival until you put it together, and by then they might be out of warranty. 

Last but not least. I have a computer that broke doen, like a year ago I was curious and took it apart to see the insides --sorry I'm just like that :( --

It's from 2009 I think but surely I can scavenge some stuff from there? Card reader, HDD, DVD and what not.

 

Pre-built computers usually have the card reader built into the case so you can't remove that. However, if it's a desktop, the DVD drive can be salvaged and re-used. The HDD can be re-used regardless of it was in a laptop or desktop. 

 

 

I read a lot of guides but they never say where can I cut corners, that's not my style but if it's possible, that would be good.

I'm guessing I should look for a good case for starters, because that will be kind of permanent and won't need upgrading, so where else should I focus my attention?

People usually way overspend on motherboards. What motherboard you use has no impact on performance. The performance difference between a 50$ board and a 120$ board or even 400$ board is non existent. 

The case also has no real impact on performance, but that's personal preference on if you feel ok with cutting corners there. Seeing how a cheap case is case is 25$ and a high end case can cost as much as 150$, it's easy to see how on a small budget it's a good place to cheap out on. There isn't a real difference in build quality past 55$, and what you get past that point is either more mounting places for extra parts, small extra features (IE sound dampening padding), and/or frivolous looks. 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#4 sanpt7777

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 11:58 AM

It's not exactly clear what you're asking. I'll try to pick out the questions you did ask the best I can, but you need to follow up with what your main point is. If it's a build you're asking for, then could you give a estimated budget? I know you kinda inferred "however much it costs to make it do this. plus some overkill", but some frame for the budget would be nice.

 

 

Which creates another question: Am I good on my notion that if I'm buying one part at a time, I'm better of following the order in which they'll be installed? I'm a n00b so taking my time building the PC is better, even though I've seen pros can build a PC in a couple of hours.

You can buy it in part over time, but it's not dependent on install order (you can just leave them in their boxes till it's time to build). Instead you buy in order of how fast parts age. So case is a case is a case since case formats rarely change. Order is something like.

Case

Case fans (if not already included in case)

Power Supply

RAM

HardDrive

Motherboard+CPU (need to be bought at same time)

CPU cooler (if needed/wanted in the first place)

Graphics Card (these advance the fastest)

 

 Downside to buying in parts is you don't know if any of the parts were dead on arrival until you put it together, and by then they might be out of warranty. 

Last but not least. I have a computer that broke doen, like a year ago I was curious and took it apart to see the insides --sorry I'm just like that :( --

It's from 2009 I think but surely I can scavenge some stuff from there? Card reader, HDD, DVD and what not.

 

Pre-built computers usually have the card reader built into the case so you can't remove that. However, if it's a desktop, the DVD drive can be salvaged and re-used. The HDD can be re-used regardless of it was in a laptop or desktop. 

 

 

I read a lot of guides but they never say where can I cut corners, that's not my style but if it's possible, that would be good.

I'm guessing I should look for a good case for starters, because that will be kind of permanent and won't need upgrading, so where else should I focus my attention?

People usually way overspend on motherboards. What motherboard you use has no impact on performance. The performance difference between a 50$ board and a 120$ board or even 400$ board is non existent. 

The case also has no real impact on performance, but that's personal preference on if you feel ok with cutting corners there. Seeing how a cheap case is case is 25$ and a high end case can cost as much as 150$, it's easy to see how on a small budget it's a good place to cheap out on. There isn't a real difference in build quality past 55$, and what you get past that point is either more mounting places for extra parts, small extra features (IE sound dampening padding), and/or frivolous looks. 

Hey you got it all perfectly. I know I have a hard time explaining myself but pretty much what you said is what I was asking. I am indeed worried that I buy a processor now and by the time I have the rest of the parts the processor is cheaper or a new one has been released. Just an example of course.

 

I am sorry I didn't mentioned a budget, I don't have savings to go dump $500 right now on a build, but I do have a budget of around $150-$220 a month I can spend on computer parts. Occasionally I get extra unexpected money at my job. Plan is to get it done in a time of 3 or 4 months. I want to buy slowly good components rather than get cheap components at the same time becasue:

1.- I don't want to buy twice

2.- I want a computer that performs. Most of the things a simple computer can do can be done in my iPhone (exagerating a bit), so why build an underpowered computer right?

 

I want to buy the best things I can afford but as you said, I don't want to spend $150 where I could have spent $50 for the same result.

I'm willing to spend more on a good full tower case. Not looking for aesthetics. I just want a big case to have plenty of space to work and not being constrained by size if I want a good video card or something. I do want liquid cooling, but seems quite expensive at over $200 a kit. Forgot to mention, but I also want to be able to use 2-3 monitors because I have some laying around in my house B), I guess it's a good convenience,I've used two at the same time and I like it for multitasking. I am in the process of learning how to web pages so could come in handy.

 

By the way, the old donor computer (RAM, HDD, DVD drive) is indeed a desktop.

 

Thanks by the way


Edited by sanpt7777, 13 October 2015 - 12:02 PM.


#5 sanpt7777

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 01:17 PM

I'll be getting one of these next week to make up the commitment of building the computer

 

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9062/phanteks-enthoo-pro-case-review

 

https://www.nzxt.com/product/detail/34-phantom.html

 

I'm more inclined to get the Phantom, but they both look very good. Besides, the Enthoo is cheaper :D


Edited by sanpt7777, 13 October 2015 - 01:37 PM.


#6 SEANIA

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 06:11 PM

 I am indeed worried that I buy a processor now and by the time I have the rest of the parts the processor is cheaper or a new one has been released.

 
That's why you buy it 2nd to last and get the things that matter least performance wise first. A higher end 310$ CPU can usually last out for about 5 years for video games- at stock CPU speed that is. I know people who still use a 300 some-odd dollar CPU from 2008 and are still able to play the latest games maxed out on it because of how much they overclocked it. 
 
Graphics card requirements advance the fastest. So they're always bought last. Unlike CPUs, GPUs really don't benefit any more long term use from overclocking. So it's not like dumping extra money into a liquid cooled GPU and special OC variant will gain you much more of a lifespan. 
 
The lifespan of a GPU is a lot shorter like I said.
The minimum 130$ card lasts about 2 years keeping up with minimum settings for most tipple A games.
Top of the line 550$-650$ cards can pull about 4 years playing all games on at least min settings at the end of that time.
The middle ground between the two between 200 to 350 is wanting to play all tripple A games at least minimum settings for 2 years, pushing most to their highest settings before that two year mark, and still being able to play a good chunk after it for a time. 
 
Weirdly, It's most cost effective to buy a new cheap 130$ card every two years. However more people go for the 200 to 350 mark because they want to be able to have the joy of supper high settings for a minute instead of always having a borderline GPU. Dollar to longevity wise, those in between cards are the best. 
 

I do want liquid cooling, but seems quite expensive at over $200 a kit. 

 

Liquid cooling can actually be cheaper then that. Companies make all-in-one prepackaged liquid coolers for use with both CPUs and GPUs. 

120mm rad versions are usually around 60$ USD, and the 240mm rad at 110$ USD. 

 

I should mention that liquid cooling is overall less reliable then air cooling. Custom built loops have a general rule of needing to be cleaned out once a year to maintain stability and to reseal everything in a effort to prevent leaks. Pre-builts like the ones I mentioned don't need cleaned out every year, but generally only come with a 3 year warranty.....and start to fail around that time to. 

 

Air cooling is the best long term option for consistent stability. A decent 35$ air cooler is enough to cool any stock CPU well within safety margins with some headroom for minor overclocking if desired. For higher overclocking, the high end 95$ air coolers seem to perform on par, or a little better then, the 60$ liquid coolers performance wise. 

 

 

 I also want to be able to use 2-3 monitors because I have some laying around in my house B)

 

That's fine. Normally two is the max on a single card when not using displayport, but recently some GPUs have been getting built in adapters to allow for three screens, on one card, using standard HDMI and/or DVI. 

 

 

I'm more inclined to get the Phantom, but they both look very good. Besides, the Enthoo is cheaper :D

 

The phantom case is something I know most people get tired of looking at. Everyone sorta starts out wanting this huge flashy case, but as more time passes the more you start to dislike the flashy bulkiness of it. Some people don't ever get tired of it, but there's a reason most of the high quality cases look closer to the Enthoo then the Phantom.

Just something to think about. 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#7 sanpt7777

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 01:33 PM

 

 I am indeed worried that I buy a processor now and by the time I have the rest of the parts the processor is cheaper or a new one has been released.

 
That's why you buy it 2nd to last and get the things that matter least performance wise first. A higher end 310$ CPU can usually last out for about 5 years for video games- at stock CPU speed that is. I know people who still use a 300 some-odd dollar CPU from 2008 and are still able to play the latest games maxed out on it because of how much they overclocked it. 
 
Graphics card requirements advance the fastest. So they're always bought last. Unlike CPUs, GPUs really don't benefit any more long term use from overclocking. So it's not like dumping extra money into a liquid cooled GPU and special OC variant will gain you much more of a lifespan. 
 
The lifespan of a GPU is a lot shorter like I said.
The minimum 130$ card lasts about 2 years keeping up with minimum settings for most tipple A games.
Top of the line 550$-650$ cards can pull about 4 years playing all games on at least min settings at the end of that time.
The middle ground between the two between 200 to 350 is wanting to play all tripple A games at least minimum settings for 2 years, pushing most to their highest settings before that two year mark, and still being able to play a good chunk after it for a time. 
 
Weirdly, It's most cost effective to buy a new cheap 130$ card every two years. However more people go for the 200 to 350 mark because they want to be able to have the joy of supper high settings for a minute instead of always having a borderline GPU. Dollar to longevity wise, those in between cards are the best. 
 

I do want liquid cooling, but seems quite expensive at over $200 a kit. 

 

Liquid cooling can actually be cheaper then that. Companies make all-in-one prepackaged liquid coolers for use with both CPUs and GPUs. 

120mm rad versions are usually around 60$ USD, and the 240mm rad at 110$ USD. 

 

I should mention that liquid cooling is overall less reliable then air cooling. Custom built loops have a general rule of needing to be cleaned out once a year to maintain stability and to reseal everything in a effort to prevent leaks. Pre-builts like the ones I mentioned don't need cleaned out every year, but generally only come with a 3 year warranty.....and start to fail around that time to. 

 

Air cooling is the best long term option for consistent stability. A decent 35$ air cooler is enough to cool any stock CPU well within safety margins with some headroom for minor overclocking if desired. For higher overclocking, the high end 95$ air coolers seem to perform on par, or a little better then, the 60$ liquid coolers performance wise. 

 

 

 I also want to be able to use 2-3 monitors because I have some laying around in my house B)

 

That's fine. Normally two is the max on a single card when not using displayport, but recently some GPUs have been getting built in adapters to allow for three screens, on one card, using standard HDMI and/or DVI. 

 

 

I'm more inclined to get the Phantom, but they both look very good. Besides, the Enthoo is cheaper :D

 

The phantom case is something I know most people get tired of looking at. Everyone sorta starts out wanting this huge flashy case, but as more time passes the more you start to dislike the flashy bulkiness of it. Some people don't ever get tired of it, but there's a reason most of the high quality cases look closer to the Enthoo then the Phantom.

Just something to think about. 

 

Very informative, thanks. I did understand what you meant with buying GPU last. It's good to hear I can spend less in a GPU because that way I'll have money left for a nice soundcard, I like music and listening with clarity.

 

The Enthoo supposedly has great ventilation, so as you say I should just skip the liquid cooling and again, have money left for other things like another pair of fans.

 

I would get the Phantom in black with blue lighting so it won't be too flashy, but I do like the low profile design of the Enthoo and I don't really like gloss plastic that much. But the Enthoo is cheaper.

 

I will let you know when I get it, hopefully soon. For now I'll do my homework because I still can't make up my mind for an OS (don't feel like paying so much for Windows but don't want to use illegal copies either, so free OS it is) and more importantly deciding if I'm going Intel or AMD with my build.



#8 SEANIA

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 10:53 PM

 that way I'll have money left for a nice soundcard, I like music and listening with clarity.

 

I'd like to address that bit. Sound cards are way less important then they use to be even for a enthusiast. A decent board actually has a built in audio card as good as most 100$ sound cards. Seriously, no joke. Companies like ASUS will even build their enthusiast Xonar sound cards into their motherboards. You think drive power might might be an issue, but a lot of the boards with these chips will have the same amount of power as a dedicated caard that runs off only it's PCIe slot power (most cards do). 

 

Point is. Unless the dedicated card has some weird port on board chips never have then there isn't a real point in getting one. Except for maybe aesthetics or if there is some special software the card comes with that you want to use (but the Xonar on board would come with that software most likely). 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#9 SEANIA

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 10:59 PM

It's good to hear I can spend less in a GPU 

 

You should know that your FPS in games is almost entirely dependent on your GPU. You can have a CPU that's a bit to weak, and RAM slightly under spec as well, but the game will still at least gimp along if graphics card is beefy enough. If your GPU is underpowered though, no amount other components being overly powerful will make up for it. 

 

Just something to keep in mind if you choose the upgrade every other year option. 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#10 sanpt7777

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 12:59 PM

I'd like to address that bit. Sound cards are way less important then they use to be even for a enthusiast. A decent board actually has a built in audio card as good as most 100$ sound cards. Seriously, no joke.

Well, then I have money for speakers I can use only on my desktop. I won't have to plug my computer to my stereo. That makes me happy :D

I actually thought it was the other way around, and manufacturers were cheaping out on sound because most people don't care. They are happy with their 55" TVs and the speakers that come with the TV. Or they buy a car because it has a touchscreen even though the sound is terrible.
 

Companies like ASUS will even build their enthusiast Xonar sound cards into their motherboards. You think drive power might might be an issue, but a lot of the boards with these chips will have the same amount of power as a dedicated caard that runs off only it's PCIe slot power (most cards do).

Point is. Unless the dedicated card has some weird port on board chips never have then there isn't a real point in getting one. Except for maybe aesthetics or if there is some special software the card comes with that you want to use (but the Xonar on board would come with that software most likely).


I actually am considering Asus for my motherboard. Just taking some time to choose the motherboard because first I also have to make up my mind on AMD vs. Intel. It's just overwhelming. So many alternatives. I don't want to cheap out nor overspend. I'm reading some reviews and I think my best bet is an i5, I will be buying this last so if there's money left I will get an i7.

 

 

It's good to hear I can spend less in a GPU


You should know that your FPS in games is almost entirely dependent on your GPU. You can have a CPU that's a bit to weak, and RAM slightly under spec as well, but the game will still at least gimp along if graphics card is beefy enough. If your GPU is underpowered though, no amount other components being overly powerful will make up for it.

Just something to keep in mind if you choose the upgrade every other year option.

I won't cheap out, I meant I will go with the idea you suggested. Buy a decent GPU and upgrade every year or two, but not spend more than necessary.


Edited by sanpt7777, 15 October 2015 - 01:01 PM.


#11 sanpt7777

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 02:21 PM

So, I made a very general idea of the build based on what you first wrote. Ideally, the budget will be set on the parts that are easily replaced or not required to be expensive. The big bucks will go mainly to the processor.

 

Case

Enthoo Pro

Case fans (if not already included in case)

Included

Power Supply

Should buy along with case?

RAM

Fury DDR3 HyperX 8GB

HardDrive

Re-use 320GB HDD, upgrade later when needed. Kingston 120GB for software and OS (will 120GB be enough?)

Motherboard+CPU (need to be bought at same time)

I believe the best bang for the buck will be an intel i5. i guess properly set a built i5 computer can out perform a bought computer with i7 (since they propbably cheap out on other components)? I'll keep reading to decide but I have weeks if not months to decide xD

CPU cooler (if needed/wanted in the first place)

None, unless can afford

Graphics Card (these advance the fastest)

Wait until the rest is done


Edited by sanpt7777, 15 October 2015 - 02:21 PM.


#12 SEANIA

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 03:00 PM

Thanks for selectively quoting. what it is you're referring to.

 

I actually thought it was the other way around, and manufacturers were cheaping out on sound because most people don't care.

 
Thy do cheap out on sound, but it's the speakers they cheap out on. They actually still do cheap out on the chip to. It's just that accurate audio chips are really, really, really, cheap now. Manufactures would have to go out of their way to try to put a bad one in their products (might even cost more to). I don't think I know something that can't do 48,000 Hz. Seriously, even my cheap 400$ laptop can output 192,000 Hz 24 bit audio.
 
Should add that you'd have to have some kind of supper human hearing or life long trained ears to hear the difference past 48,000 Hz. Not to call you're hearing bad or anything, but I don't know anyone that can hear the difference past that. Studios will use 192,000 Hz, but that's just for a professional over kill stuff- like having quadruple shielding and a twin line running the same audio with something at the end to detect differences between the two. Absolutely point less for us, but for that one in a billion chance something does go wrong in the most severe scenario, the professional will be fine and his reputation remain intact.
 
The main bottle neck in any system for sound quality is almost always the speakers, and if it's not the speakers then it'll be lack of shielding somewhere along the lines or equipment with interference from other hardware (which can usually be solved with some aluminium tape). Then after that it's not having enough driving power for the speakers, but that's something you buy a dedicated amplifier for and not a sound card. Cards that do have ridiculously powerful amplifiers that require a dedicated power line are notorious for having bad buzzes and general interference from the power line being so close and running so much omph through it. 
 
The worst a manufacture can do to make them perform worse, by making it cheaper, is putting in cheap capacitors and not shielding around the audio chip or under powering it. Good manufactures like ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, ECT use high quality capacitors and shielding on all of their products though.
,
 

I also have to make up my mind on AMD vs. Intel. It's just overwhelming.

 
That's something to research when the time comes to buy the CPU+board (same goes for GPU). Tech is constantly changing, and something that is the best choice this month may not be the best choice next month when you go to buy it. 
 
Right at this moment, Intel is the choice (hands down)  for what it is you want. Like I said though that may change in a month or two (or whenever) you go to buy it.
 

I won't cheap out, I meant I will go with the idea you suggested. Buy a decent GPU and upgrade every year or two, but not spend more than necessary.

 

I personally don't suggest the buying every other year option. Just that the "buying every other year" is most cost effective option to keep up with requirements. If new GPU tech comes out you don't have to worry about being compatible with it because you'd be getting another one by the time it becomes majorly adopted anyways. There may be a couple games you can't play in that time, but you don'y worry since you are buying again soon, and then you would be able to play them.

 

 If I were you I'd get a 220$-ish GPU when you go to get it, but that's me. It's a bad feeling to feel like you're always just that little bit behind the curve. Having to constantly worry about if the new big tripple A game can run on your rig right away or if you'll have to wait for your next upgrade. Getting the 220$ one gets rid of that worry and checking- it gains you more confidence in your rigs abilities.


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#13 SEANIA

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 03:10 PM

HardDrive

upgrade later when needed.

 

Kingston 120GB for software and OS (will 120GB be enough?)

That's the perfect thing to do for storage. 120GB is enough. That's what most people go for when on a budget but want a SSD. I personally recommend Samsungs 850 EVO line since they use 3D nand flash, but that's a personal preference and whatever brand it is you like to use is fine I'm sure.

 

Motherboard+CPU (need to be bought at same time)

I believe the best bang for the buck will be an intel i5. 

 i5's are the best price point CPU for Intel price to performance wise, but despite i7's being worse for that. The i7 is much much better for a longevity built like you want. When the i7 is properly used by games (when the CPU requirements increase) it may start to perform up to 50% better in games then the i5 will in the future. Right now though, the performance difference is minimal in the under 10% area.

 

Rest of what you said seems pretty alright.


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#14 RolandJS

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 03:17 PM

Don't forget to add to your collection two external HDs, a good backup/restore program.  If your OS gets hosed partially or completely, a restore, if images are made bi-monthly, will put you right back in business.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#15 sanpt7777

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 03:45 PM

 

Thanks for selectively quoting. what it is you're referring to.

 

Yeah, I was getting worried not doing it but I just don’t know how to on my desktop. I did it on my iPhone where the brackets and the quote code does show up.

 

 


Thy do cheap out on sound, but it's the speakers they cheap out on. They actually still do cheap out on the chip to. It's just that accurate audio chips are really, really, really, cheap now. Manufactures would have to go out of their way to try to put a bad one in their products (might even cost more to). I don't think I know something that can't do 48,000 Hz. Seriously, even my cheap 400$ laptop can output 192,000 Hz 24 bit audio.

 

48kHz is just enough. I can’t tell the difference past that to be honest.

 

 


Should add that you'd have to have some kind of supper human hearing or life long trained ears to hear the difference past 48,000 Hz. Not to call you're hearing bad or anything, but I don't know anyone that can hear the difference past that. Studios will use 192,000 Hz, but that's just for a professional over kill stuff- like having quadruple shielding and a twin line running the same audio with something at the end to detect differences between the two. Absolutely point less for us, but for that one in a billion chance something does go wrong in the most severe scenario, the professional will be fine and his reputation remain intact.

Haha exactly what I meant above. I like good sound but my benchmarks are still only my home stereo and my ex-Volvo audio system. That thing was great.

 

 

 


The main bottle neck in any system for sound quality is almost always the speakers, and if it's not the speakers then it'll be lack of shielding somewhere along the lines or equipment with interference from other hardware (which can usually be solved with some aluminium tape). Then after that it's not having enough driving power for the speakers, but that's something you buy a dedicated amplifier for and not a sound card. Cards that do have ridiculously powerful amplifiers that require a dedicated power line are notorious for having bad buzzes and general interference from the power line being so close and running so much omph through it.

The worst a manufacture can do to make them perform worse, by making it cheaper, is putting in cheap capacitors and not shielding around the audio chip or under powering it. Good manufactures like ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, ECT use high quality capacitors and shielding on all of their products though.


Yeah I just need it to be a bit over adequate. Every time I use a computer I have to settle with the mediocre integrated speakers. Just want something that will be good enough.

 

 

That's something to research when the time comes to buy the CPU+board (same goes for GPU). Tech is constantly changing, and something that is the best choice this month may not be the best choice next month when you go to buy it.

Right at this moment, Intel is the choice (hands down) 
for what it is you want. Like I said though that may change in a month or two (or whenever) you go to buy it.

 

 

You are right. I’m drowning on a glass of water like they say. I’ll worry first about the case. I have an idea about that too*.

 

 


I personally don't suggest the buying every other year option. Just that the "buying every other year" is most cost effective option to keep up with requirements. If new GPU tech comes out you don't have to worry about being compatible with it because you'd be getting another one by the time it becomes majorly adopted anyways. There may be a couple games you can't play in that time, but you don'y worry since you are buying again soon, and then you would be able to play them.

 

If I were you I'd get a 220$-ish GPU when you go to get it, but that's me. It's a bad feeling to feel like you're always just that little bit behind the curve. Having to constantly worry about if the new big tripple A game can run on your rig right away or if you'll have to wait for your next upgrade. Getting the 220$ one gets rid of that worry and checking- it gains you more confidence in your rigs abilities.
 

I actually had something in mind but don’t know if it’s worth it. Buy a decent affordable GPU, and then in a year upgrade to something serious that will last without need of constant upgrade. But I might as well buy one in the range you said because there is something else*.


 

 

 

 


That's the perfect thing to do for storage. 120GB is enough. That's what most people go for when on a budget but want a SSD. I personally recommend Samsungs 850 EVO line since they use 3D nand flash, but that's a personal preference and whatever brand it is you like to use is fine I'm sure.

 

 


 

 

Motherboard+CPU (need to be bought at same time)
I believe the best bang for the buck will be an intel i5.
 
i5's are the best price point CPU for Intel price to performance wise, but despite i7's being worse for that. The i7 is much much better for a longevity built like you want. When the i7 is properly used by games (when the CPU requirements increase) it may start to perform up to 50% better in games then the i5 will in the future. Right now though, the performance difference is minimal in the under 10% area.

Rest of what you said seems pretty alright.

 

 

That’s good to hear. You used the exact word, longevity. That’s part of why I wan’t to overbuild it over my needs.

 

*I had edited my last post just before you replied, but basically I wrote something like this:

Sorry for the extra questions but the more I research/think, the more doubts come to me. I’d like your opinion on something that just occurred to me.

I had not considered this option at first because I had some ideas set but doing research turns out I may be wrong, what a surprise haha

I believed I couldn’t use my old case because some manufacturers have weird placement on their motherboards and it’s hard to upgrade. I still rather buy the Enthoo, it’s affordable and looks big inside, but maybe I should try building my current case so I can save those extra $100 plus shipping for my processor. $100 do a big difference to me. As I told you, I don’t mind going all out on a good processor knowing that it will perform better and last, and I’d rather compromise on other areas. I can always swap cases later on my build.

Plus, another advantage is that I would finish my PC sooner. It all comes down to see if my case is ATX.

 

Thanks again, SEANIA. Computer stuff is very counterintuitive at times.  I appreciate the advice :thumbup2: 


Edited by sanpt7777, 15 October 2015 - 03:56 PM.





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