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How do I give myself read and write access to these locations?


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#1 andrewset

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 02:59 PM

Hello, How do I give myself read and write access to these locations, as seen in the attached image?:

Attached File  2015-10-08_0816.png   113.48KB   0 downloads



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#2 usasma

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 05:04 AM

FIRST - you back your registry up.  You will be messing with areas that can quickly make your system unbootable - so you'll also have to know how to restore the backup of the registry when you're not able to boot to WIndows.

 

Then you open up regedit, right click on the key desired, and click on Permissions, then on the Advanced button to give greater access.

I really do not suggest doing this - especially when you're messing with core Windows components.

There may be an easier way to fix this (such as uninstalling/reinstall a fresh copy of the snagt (1).exe program )


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#3 dannyboy950

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 09:40 AM

I used to love the original version of the Jv16 power tools.  How ever monkeying about to aggresivly with their registry editor or any registry editor can be hazardous to your computer in unskilled/knowledgeable hands.

 

I know the hard way killed a few of my own systems before.


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#4 x64

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 02:06 PM

Usasma's assessment is correct - you should not mess with the permissions.

 

Instead of fiddling with registry permissions. Try running the app "as Administrator" once - maybe it will be able to write what it needs to that way and save you changing things that should not really be touched (seriously!)

 

Even better - maybe there is a newer release of snagit that plays nicely as a non-admin user.

 

Relaxing permissions in system areas was a useful tactic back to get poorly written software to run as non privileged users in the XP/Win 2000 days, but those days are long gone (hurrah!), however it comes at the expense of un-securing the target system. Relaxing permissions to the "session manager" key or the "control" key seems line a particularly effective method of un-securing the system.

 

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