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DDR3 and DDR4


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#1 biferibiferi

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 10:00 PM

I know DDR3 memory has two notches on bot side and the one notche in the bottum center is the one Offset.

 

But when I look up DDR4 memory it looks just like DDR3.

 

Can you help?



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#2 gigawert

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 10:32 PM

Well, most motherboards still only support DDR3. You'll have to spend more on a motherboard if you want DDR4.


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#3 Platypus

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 12:24 AM

DDR4 has the locating notch in a different position, and more "pins" (edge contact pads).


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#4 gigawert

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 09:11 AM

DDR4 has the locating notch in a different position, and more "pins" (edge contact pads).

Exactly... So you would need a mobo that supports DDR4.


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#5 dc3

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 10:45 AM

1.  Well, most motherboards still only support DDR3.

 

2.  You'll have to spend more on a motherboard if you want DDR4.

1.  Obviously you have not done any online shopping recently.  DDR4 motherboards are every bit as prevalent as the DDR3 motherboards.  

 

2.  That isn't necessarily true.  As with any new computer hardware technology, the newer technology is going to cost more initially.  But if you do some shopping you will find DDR3 motherboards which are every bit as expensive as the newer DDR4 motherboards.  At this point DDR3 motherboards comparatively have become very affordable.  The price of older technology will always go down in price in order to reduce the amount of stock available of the older technology.   


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#6 dc3

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 10:57 AM

DDR4 has the locating notch in a different position, and more "pins" (edge contact pads).

These pins are called keys.  The modules are "keyed" so that they will only fit into motherboards which support these modules.


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#7 jonuk76

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 01:19 PM

The "keys" are, to the best of my knowledge, the notches cut into the memory module to prevent insertion into the wrong type slot.  "Pins" (generally) refers to the gold contact points (288 pins in DDR4's case vs. 240 in DDR3 in desktop size DIMMs).  Also note the slightly curved shape of the connector (which gets deeper at the middle), which is another difference.

 

352d9842fc17c7a5d45021f34a6583bf.jpg

(image from Pintrest)

 

As for prevelence and prices, I don't think the environment is such that manufacturers can charge large premiums for new memory technology like DDR4 now.  Last I looked it was a little more costly than DDR3, but not much.  The technology allows for higher density memory and in time I'd expect that 16 GB and larger DIMM's will filter through to mainstream, with corresponding falls in cost per GB.  A prototype 128 GB (!) DDR4 DIMM has been produced, I believe.


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#8 Platypus

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 02:11 AM

The "keys" are, to the best of my knowledge, the notches cut into the memory module to prevent insertion into the wrong type slot.  "Pins" (generally) refers to the gold contact points (288 pins in DDR4's case vs. 240 in DDR3 in desktop size DIMMs).  Also note the slightly curved shape of the connector (which gets deeper at the middle), which is another difference.


True. The electrical connection to DRAM was originally made via physical pins, both as the "legs" of individual ICs as in my first Z80 and 8086 computers, then SIPPs (Single In-line Pin Package) as used by my first 286. When SIMMs then DIMMs overran the short lived SIPPs, the custom of referring to the module connector pads as pins remained.

When I upgraded my 286 with a 386SX mainboard that used SIMMs, I carefully de-soldered the pins from the SIPPs so they would fit into a SIMM edge connector, and used them in a Promise hard drive caching controller in that 386 and my subsequent 486SX.

Edited by Platypus, 08 October 2015 - 02:12 AM.

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#9 technonymous

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 12:11 AM

Right now only Intel boards support DDR4. AMD is working on it though.






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