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CPU temp warning, bad processor or mobo?


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#1 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 09:51 AM

Just recently and suddenly, Windows10 is showing CPU over heat warning messages. My system is an Intel i7 2600K (with no overclocking) on an ASUS P8P67-EVO Mobo.

 

Initially, I noticed that some applications and the system slowed and sometime locks up.  This got worse as time went on.  I ran several system temp applications, and they all confirm CPU high temps (far above 80 c) at idle.  I use an H50 water cooler.  BIOS (updated and confirmed) showed that the cooler was running at only 1000 RPM, so I replaced it with an H55 cooler. The H55 showed a higher pump RMP.  But at times the new cooler started showing lower pump RPMs (roughly 1190 RPMs).  The new cooler did not resolve the over heating issue.  In further troubleshooting steps, I reseated the processor, replaced the thermal paste (twice), and installed an air cooler. None of these fixed the CPU overheating problem.  I did not replace the processor because I do not have an extra 1155 processors to try.

 

In BIOS, I can watch the temp increase to warning temps within minutes after system startup. 

 

How do I know which item to replace?  How do I determine if this issue is a bad processor or a bad Mobo?



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#2 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 10:00 AM

I am having a similar issue with my i7 system.  I've replaced a host of items, three cpu coolers, reseated the processor, changed thermal past, cleaned everything. Yet, the system still shows system overheating.  In BIOS, I can see the CPU temps climbing to shutdown temps within minutes after starting the machine.  I am trying to know if it is the mobo or processor that is at fault.


Edited by Queen-Evie, 04 October 2015 - 01:00 PM.
split from http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/581347/unknown-cause-of-cpu-overheating-no-dust-in-heatsink and merged into this topic


#3 dc3

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 10:57 AM

 
Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  Clicking on this link will automatically initiate the download. 
 
When Speccy opens you will see a screen similar to the one below.
 
speccy9_zps2d9cdedc.png
 
Click on File which is outlined in red in the screen above, and then click on Publish Snapshot.
 
The following screen will appear, click on Yes.
 
speccy7_zpsfa02105f.png
 
The following screen will appear, click on Copy to Clipboard.
 
speccy3_zps1791b093.png
 
In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.
 
 
 

Please download MiniToolBox to your desktop.
 
Right-click on MiniToolBox.exe and select Run as Administrator.
 
You will see an image like the one below.
 
minitoolbox_zps7byuwkla.png
 
Click on the following checkboxes only:
 
• List last 10 Event Viewer log
• List Installed Programs
• List Users, Partitions and Memory size.
• List Minidump Files
 
Click on Go to start the scan.  Once it is finished highlight the text, then copy it and paste it in your topic.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:03 AM

As this overheating issue has gotten worse, the system will not boot at this point. 

After post, the system stops and initiates a warning beep and shows high temp warning and a prompt to press F1.

Pressing F1 takes me to the BIOS screen.

 

I am dead in the water at this point.  I am trying to determine what to replace as my ability to troubleshoot is at an end.



#5 dc3

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:08 AM

Open the case and inspect the heatsink and fan assembly on the CPU.  If it is dusty purchase a canned Duster and blow them out.  Also clean out the rest of the case.

 

Before touching any components in the case, touch the bare metal of the case to discharge any static electricity in your system.  A static discharge can kill board components.


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#6 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:12 AM

Yes, I always use an anti static strap when handling components in the case.  The system is clean at can be.  The coolers are brand new and I replaced the fans.  The case has been setup where the pressure inside is higher than the pressure out side the case, so dust inside the case is minimal.



#7 dc3

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:16 AM

If you built this computer I would suggest cleaning the thermal compound off of the heatsink and CPU and reapply the new thermal compound.

 

Please list all of the components installed in this computer.

 

Is this a full ATX case?


Edited by dc3, 04 October 2015 - 11:17 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 jonuk76

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:37 AM

I replaced it with an H55 cooler. The H55 showed a higher pump RMP.  But at times the new cooler started showing lower pump RPMs (roughly 1190 RPMs).  The new cooler did not resolve the over heating issue.  In further troubleshooting steps, I reseated the processor, replaced the thermal paste (twice), and installed an air cooler. None of these fixed the CPU overheating problem.  I did not replace the processor because I do not have an extra 1155 processors to try.

 

In BIOS, I can watch the temp increase to warning temps within minutes after system startup. 

 

How do I know which item to replace?  How do I determine if this issue is a bad processor or a bad Mobo?

 

I don't really understand what is going on there either.  Are these heat sinks making good contact?  You can check this by fitting the heat sink (with just a small amount of thermal paste in the centre of the CPU), tightening it down fully, and then reversing the process.  If it's making good contact, the TIM should spread evenly out from the centre, in a very thin layer.  Here is a detailed page on TIM application methods - https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Thermal-Paste-Application-Techniques-170/

 

Assuming that is the case, a bad temperature sensor sounds a possibility, although I have never encountered that issue personally, and intense googling seems to show it's a red herring - all cases I've found seemed to be issues with the CPU cooler fitment. There is actually a similar thread on here I found from a few years ago, and that too looked to be the more likely explanation of inadequate pressure on the CPU from the cooler, or lack of thermal compound

 

I might also reset the BIOS to rule out any outside possibility of CPU voltage being accidentally cranked up to a dangerous level or something, but that is clutching at straws in honesty!


7sbvuf-6.png


#9 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:40 AM

Yes, I've reinstalled the thermal past twice.  The computer's components are kept with great care in terms of environmental conditions.  The computer has functioned perfectly since I built it three years ago.  These heat issues started a week ago and has gotten to the point where the system will not boot past post.

 

The PC has a full ATX case

Asus 80867-EVO (w/ up to date BIOS)

Intel 2600K processor (not overclocked)

Cousair H55 cooler (newly swapped out an H50)

16GB DDR3 of 1333 Kingston HyperX ram

2, GTX 760 GPU in SLI mode (Ran the system with one GPU installed with no change in temp readings)

A couple of hard drives (SSD and spinning disk types)

Antec 1000 watt PSU (Swapped out the 1000 watt PSU with a new 800 watt Antec PSU with no change in temp readings)



#10 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:48 AM

 

I replaced it with an H55 cooler. The H55 showed a higher pump RMP.  But at times the new cooler started showing lower pump RPMs (roughly 1190 RPMs).  The new cooler did not resolve the over heating issue.  In further troubleshooting steps, I reseated the processor, replaced the thermal paste (twice), and installed an air cooler. None of these fixed the CPU overheating problem.  I did not replace the processor because I do not have an extra 1155 processors to try.

 

In BIOS, I can watch the temp increase to warning temps within minutes after system startup. 

 

How do I know which item to replace?  How do I determine if this issue is a bad processor or a bad Mobo?

 

I don't really understand what is going on there either.  Are these heat sinks making good contact?  You can check this by fitting the heat sink (with just a small amount of thermal paste in the centre of the CPU), tightening it down fully, and then reversing the process.  If it's making good contact, the TIM should spread evenly out from the centre, in a very thin layer.  Here is a detailed page on TIM application methods - https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Thermal-Paste-Application-Techniques-170/

 

Assuming that is the case, a bad temperature sensor sounds a possibility, although I have never encountered that issue personally, and intense googling seems to show it's a red herring - all cases I've found seemed to be issues with the CPU cooler fitment. There is actually a similar thread on here I found from a few years ago, and that too looked to be the more likely explanation of inadequate pressure on the CPU from the cooler, or lack of thermal compound

 

I might also reset the BIOS to rule out any outside possibility of CPU voltage being accidentally cranked up to a dangerous level or something, but that is clutching at straws in honesty!

 

The first and last thing I did was to look at the BIOS to confirm that all was set to defaults.  There, I can watch as the CPU temps climb (within 60 seconds) into the red, well over 80c all while in BIOS. 

 

This is recent on a machine that has been running perfectly.  This is not a new build.



#11 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 11:57 AM

I read the article link.  I am without a doubt applying enough paste to get good thermal transfer.  Again, this is not a new build.  These issues started a week ago and has progressed to the point where the PC will not boot past post.



#12 mjd420nova

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 12:34 PM

This sounds like a candidate for a can of freeze spray.  Monitoring the temps while spraying individual areas of the board.  It does sound as though the CPU has failed if no cooler can keep it below danger temps.



#13 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 01:12 PM

OK, this is heading in a direction which points to a specific component.  You feel that it is the processor rather than the board? 

 

I have started looking at the price of replacing the board or processor and find that the 2600K (1155 socket) is not available new in my local computer stores. I have seen new 2600K processors on Ebay and Amazon at considerably high prices relative to the cost of new current generation components.  The same holds true board. Except, I have only seen used ones on Amazon and Ebay. 

 

I have major reservations about buying used boards and/or processors.



#14 gpruitt54

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 01:14 PM

This sounds like a candidate for a can of freeze spray.  Monitoring the temps while spraying individual areas of the board.  It does sound as though the CPU has failed if no cooler can keep it below danger temps.

Frozen spray?  What is this, how is it used, the how do you control the condensation on an electrical component like a motherboard???



#15 jonuk76

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 01:40 PM

Does your motherboard bios allow you to monitor each core temperature or does it just show an overall CPU temp?


7sbvuf-6.png





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