Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Windows 10 Update Pop-Up Keeps Coming Back


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 pots elgoog

pots elgoog

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 03 October 2015 - 04:52 PM

I have removed it numerous times by uninstalling the KB3035583 update but it keeps coming back like a bad penny. I made the decision last year to go with Apple when this PC dies but things like this make think I shouldn't wait. I just can't afford toi do it right now. Been using my iphone a lot more though lol. 

 

Is there a way to get this damn popup out of my system? 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 pots elgoog

pots elgoog
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 03 October 2015 - 04:57 PM

PS I am using Win 7 with no intention of ever taking Win 10.


Edited by pots elgoog, 03 October 2015 - 04:57 PM.


#3 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 05 October 2015 - 02:36 PM

You can stop the update returning by setting your updates to "check automatically but ask me whether to download", then every tuesday evening or wednesday morning you must go to "windows update" in "control panel", see what updates are available, tick all of the ones with names starting "Security Update for..." and for all the others (those starting "Update for...") go to their "More information" links, at those more information links read the description and work out if the update solves a bug you have suffered or if it is irrelevant, or if it is an unwanted one which will try and give you windows 10. Unless it's a security update or one which solves a bug you have actually had, then untick it. Do this for each update offered. Also make sure to uninstall KB3044374 as well as uninstalling KB3035583, getting rid of both of these should stop the gwx prompt and mean you stop getting offered windows 10. If these steps don't work further actions can be taken to prevent windows 10, but start with these steps and there's a good chance they will be all you need to do.

Also please make yourself a system image http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/#manual you never know when you might need it. If you already had an old enough system image made you could revert to it now and go back to a time before the unpleasant windows 10 prompt causing updates were installed, although such reverting would erase any programs you've installed since the image was made, and it would likely also erase any files made ince the image was made, so you would need files and installers for programs backed up on external devices. Atleast by making yourself an image now then if things get worse in future you can revert to how they are now. After you've fixed this you can make another system image, so in future you can quickly revert to a time when things were working well.

P.S. on windows 7 there's a few other updates to uninstall as well, but I don't have them listed before me right now.

Edited by rp88, 05 October 2015 - 02:37 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#4 Union_Thug

Union_Thug

    Bleeps with the fishes...


  • Members
  • 2,355 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:is everything
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 05 October 2015 - 02:58 PM

Guess what? It's Baaaaaa-ack! 6th revision published today 10/05/15, needs to be re-re-re-re-re-re-hidden lol.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3035583

 

34500f84_o.png


Edited by Union_Thug, 05 October 2015 - 03:01 PM.


#5 pots elgoog

pots elgoog
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 05 October 2015 - 03:04 PM

You can stop the update returning by setting your updates to "check automatically but ask me whether to download", then every tuesday evening or wednesday morning you must go to "windows update" in "control panel", see what updates are available, tick all of the ones with names starting "Security Update for..." and for all the others (those starting "Update for...") go to their "More information" links, at those more information links read the description and work out if the update solves a bug you have suffered or if it is irrelevant, or if it is an unwanted one which will try and give you windows 10. Unless it's a security update or one which solves a bug you have actually had, then untick it. Do this for each update offered. Also make sure to uninstall KB3044374 as well as uninstalling KB3035583, getting rid of both of these should stop the gwx prompt and mean you stop getting offered windows 10. If these steps don't work further actions can be taken to prevent windows 10, but start with these steps and there's a good chance they will be all you need to do.

Also please make yourself a system image http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/#manual you never know when you might need it. If you already had an old enough system image made you could revert to it now and go back to a time before the unpleasant windows 10 prompt causing updates were installed, although such reverting would erase any programs you've installed since the image was made, and it would likely also erase any files made ince the image was made, so you would need files and installers for programs backed up on external devices. Atleast by making yourself an image now then if things get worse in future you can revert to how they are now. After you've fixed this you can make another system image, so in future you can quickly revert to a time when things were working well.

P.S. on windows 7 there's a few other updates to uninstall as well, but I don't have them listed before me right now.

 

Thanks for the info RP. I tried another of one of the many "solutions"  after I posted here and it has kept it off since then. But this MS BS has only reaffirmed my resolve to rid my life of the Windows OS 100% once and for all. Thanks.



#6 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 05 October 2015 - 03:54 PM

Post #5, when it comes to time to switch some day you might also consider linux as well as considering apple. Glad to have helped with your issue, any further problems or recurrence of gwx, post here about it, on this thread.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#7 pots elgoog

pots elgoog
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 05 October 2015 - 04:36 PM

I looked at linux a few years ago but best I recall (which doesn't mean much) it's not exactly plug & play like apple is. I need as little learning curve as possible. My focus is not computers - I use them as a tool and while it's true the better one can use a tool the more efficient one can work - I have to find the best balance I can. I've been using iphone/pad for a couple years now and know it will work for my desktop needs (I prefer a large monitor and keyboard when possible). 



#8 joshuals

joshuals

  • Members
  • 433 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Quebec (Summer) Arizona (Winter)
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 05 October 2015 - 08:37 PM

If you are only interested in "not seeing" the Win10 popup without having to uninstall anything or make other changes, do this: (I have Win7)

  • Click on the up arrow in your System Tray
  • In the resulting pop-up, click "customize"
  • In the resulting pane, find the entry for GWX and change the setting to "Hide Notification and Icons"

I changed this setting two days after the release of Win10 and have not had any pester screens since that time.......and it's easy to reverse if you later decide you want to upgrade to Win10.....


Edited by joshuals, 05 October 2015 - 08:40 PM.


#9 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:06 PM

In regards to post #8, I do suggest that simply hiding the gwx icon isn't really enough, I beelive that even if it is hidden it will still be runing unwanted in the background and might well use up your bandwiidth downloading windows 10's installation files. as you have "no intenton of ever taking windows 10" I suggest you should remove gwx and the updates responsble for it, not just hide it's visible effect. Out of sight might be out of the usr's mind but it doesn't stop gwx potentially hogging bandwidth and memory or making other unwelcome changes.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#10 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 9,024 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:18 PM

The transition between any two operating systems, no matter what they are, is not an easy proposition.  This is particularly so when one has never used anything other than a given operating system.

 

I have advised clients for years that if they're thinking of going from Windows to OS-X [or any other operating system] that they really need to find a friend who already has a machine with the "transition to" OS on it and to work on that machine for as long as you can get access to determine whether or not you're willing or able to undertake the learning curve necessary to make that transition.   The answer is frequently "no."

 

I've worked on various "flavors" of Unix (all quite a while ago) over the years as well as the various iterations of Apple OSes and everything from MS-DOS to Win10.  The decision about whether the effort to make a transition is hugely personal and is best done with some experimenting beforehand to get a real sense of what it will involve.  I've seen a lot of buyer's remorse when this decision was made in haste and when going back was not a practical option.

 

So far I have to say that I very much prefer Windows 10 to Windows 8.  It appears that Microsoft did listen to the hue and cry that went up when they removed very familiar, and very functional, features such as the Start button when they went to Windows 8.  Windows 10 brings back a lot of what I missed from earlier versions of Windows while retaining a more modern look and feel.  The one thing I really do miss, though, is the easy ability to do a "Send to->desktop" for programs/apps.  It can be done, but requires a few gyrations to accomplish when it really shouldn't.


Edited by britechguy, 06 October 2015 - 12:21 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#11 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:27 PM

The good thing about linux is that you can run it as a live operating system for a while, or as an operating system nstalled on an external hard-drive to give you chance to have a go with it and make your mind up. It can be done in such a way that you have a computer running both your current windows OS and a linux one, to run the lnux one you would turn the machine off, plug in the external hard-drive then turn on again and it would boot to linux instead of windows. To do this you have to set particular settings in the BIOS/UEFI including turning off secure boot (if present) and reordering what order the machine should look at different places to find the OS to boot from and you must disable any kind of "fast startup" options.

Edited by rp88, 06 October 2015 - 12:27 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#12 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 9,024 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:32 PM

rp88,

 

         That's absolutely true and it's something I've encouraged those technical enough to do this to do so.  Otherwise I've offered to set this up for them so that they can do an extended "test drive" before deciding.

 

          I cannot tell you how many weeping clients I've had who've either gone Windows to OS-X or vice versa just because they were so angry or frustrated over a given single incident (or small number of incidents widely spaced out in time).   There is no such thing as a truly intuitive computer interface nor an OS that doesn't have its occasional meltdowns (at least those on PCs, anyway).

 

          I do all I can to encourage folks to "know before you go."

 

          Back to the original issue, though, I have always had luck with uninstalling the given Windows Update that's causing whatever is driving me crazy and then doing a "hide this update" when it shows up again for installation.   I never allow Windows Update to operate in full automatic mode, as I cannot accept random shutdowns when I am away from my machine.  I set Windows Update to automatically download the updates and let me choose when to install them.

 

           Actually, another shortcoming in Win10, as far as I'm concerned, is the inability to refuse specific updates (or at least I haven't found any way to do this).  You can choose to make the machine wait for you to schedule a restart before they'll be installed, but I've not found any way to review them and pick and choose which I may or may not want.  Of course, I see this "from the other side," too, having been a tech geek for decades and watching many problems [very many problems] have as their basis the unwillingness to apply any Windows updates as they were released.  The vast majority of updates are to your distinct advantage to allow.


Edited by britechguy, 06 October 2015 - 12:37 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#13 pots elgoog

pots elgoog
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:50 PM

Britechguy I'm not exactly certain what you're saying, but it sounds like you're saying most people regret moving from one OS to another all the sudden. I wouldn't be doing that inasmuch as I have been using my ipad and iphone for over 2 years and I love it. I had purchased a new PC about 5 years ago with Win7 on it. I'm typing from that PC right now. I have liked the computer overall, but I have had several viruses a couple were very nasty and I thought I'd never get rid of them. The computer is also now going offline randomly 3 or 4 times a week and when turned back on I get the "WIndows has recovered from an unexpected shutdown . . . " etc. 

 

I've not had a single hiccup from either of my apple products. I'm NOT a ford v chevy kind of guy - I'm a woodworker, logger, sawyer (sawmill owner) --  I own a woodworking forum and see most of my members prefer a certain tool because they are brand loyalists. Brand loyalty is so ridiculous because you automatically exclude yourself from buying the better tool in the class simply because there's so many different woodworking tools that no single company can possibly make the best tool in every category. My shop looks like a store because I have literally dozens and dozens of brands of tools. 

 

However, with an OS it seems quite different at least to this layman. Windows OS has so many negatives compared to OS x it seems like an easy choice to me. I've never had malware or a virus on any of my mac products and never a hardware issue- I've all 3 of those issues (and more) on this one single Windows machine, and of all the several dozen-ish Windows PC and laptops I've owned over the past 25+ years I've had problems from ongoing minor all the way up to total failure and everything in between *on every single Windows machine I have owned!". 

 

I'm not a mac apologist by any means I am sure I will have an issue or two at some point, but Windows has lost another customer and from my perspective the only question I ask myself is why has it taken me this long to open my eyes. 


Edited by pots elgoog, 06 October 2015 - 12:53 PM.


#14 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 01:12 PM

Post #13 "...several viruses a couple were very nasty and I thought I'd never get rid of them..."

That's one of the things which making a system image in advance can cure, if you'd had a system image made before the infection happened you could have reverted to it and been up and running again in a few hours like nothing had ever happened. If you make a system image at a time when your computer is running well, has all the programs you like installed, has any bundled bloatware uninstalled and has your operating system settings as you prefer then you can use that systsme image at a later date to take a computer with software problems back to that good state. But you need to backup your personal files (pictures/audio/videos/documents/zip archives/pdf files...) separately on usb stciks or cd or dvd discs.

As far as your comments on brand loyalty go I would suggest the key differences between windows mac and linux operating systems are summed up below:

Windows: previously a powerful work horse of an OS, designed to act as an environment for users (home and business) to run whatever programs they needed for whatever purpose they liked, but now veering towards trying to make tablet like operating systems with little freedom for the user and fancy interfaces.

Mac: reliable OS with little effort required to run and not many (but some)viruses, has always lacked the choice previous windows versions had however windows is now becoming more like it.

Linux: powerful OS with many choices for the user but unlike windows or mac can't usually be bought pre-set-up, potentially more work needed by a user to carry out some tasks but not to the extent of a user NEEDING to use command lines.

Edited by rp88, 06 October 2015 - 01:12 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#15 leithanne

leithanne

  • Members
  • 327 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Philly 'burbs
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 06 October 2015 - 02:25 PM

Pots, may I suggest that after you transition to a Mac, you, at least try Linux on the old pc? Linux has come a long way in the past few years, and you might well end up with a "free" "new" computer that you will enjoy. About the hardest thing about Linux, these days, is changing the boot order so you can install it. ~g~






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users