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#1 nickautomatic

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Posted 02 October 2015 - 08:30 PM

Can anyone give me a sample C program for factorial? A program will ask a user to enter an integer.

 

sample result

 

Enter an integer:

 

the factorial of 5 is 120.



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#2 Slurppa

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Posted 03 October 2015 - 11:12 AM

Take a look at this:

http://fahad-cprogramming.blogspot.fi/2013/02/program-to-find-factorial-in-C-Programming.html



#3 nickautomatic

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 04:59 PM

thank you, Slurppa.


Edited by nickautomatic, 06 October 2015 - 05:00 PM.


#4 AceInfinity

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 10:33 PM

You can use a recursive function for calculating factorials. I seen a video posted by another member on a different forum in which was from a Harvard student attempting to explain recursion, and factorial was the prime example but she didn't consider that 0! == 1, and the recursive approach she was demonstrating was one that led to a stackoverflow in such a case. Just a point to show that recursion isn't always the easiest thing even for supposedly some of the brightest student minds.

 

Here's a recursive factorial function:

unsigned long factorial(unsigned int n)
{
  return n ? n * factorial(n - 1) : 1;
}
 

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