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Linux For A Septuagenarian?


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#1 sikntired

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 07:47 AM

I was quite pleased to read about this users experience: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/591975/my-linux-experience/

 

This experience reflects what I would hope to accomplish. However, I am not very computer-literate but not so old as not to try new things, lol. I am capable of following direction but have become confused about various tutorials regarding Linux.

 

Everyone has their own opinion about Linux and that is as it should be. For a real novice this has become problematic as I am looking for a OS that is relatively easy to install and understand. Some user-friendly programs mentioned was Linux Mint-cinnamon.

 

I am respectfully requesting assistance from those of you who are most knowledgeable in this area. Quite frankly, I am at a loss where to begin. Tried linking to some tutorials and reading but the more I read the more confused I got (not hard for me, lol).

 

I have always found answers to my questions and extremely helpful assistance here at BC and am very grateful for this site which I probably haven't said enough.

 

Thanks in advance for any thoughts and suggestions.



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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 10:16 AM

So I think the first thing you would want to decide is this: do you want to just try Linux on a bootable USB (or a live CD)? Or do you want to make your system a dual boot one so you have both Windows installed and Linux installed?

 

In my opinion, since you have never used Linux, you would probably want to make a bootable USB and try Linux on there. That way you don't have to mess with installing along side Windows and such. That will give you the ability to try without buying, if you will. You'll be able to get the feel of Linux and decide if you want to pursue it further.


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#3 leithanne

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 10:23 AM

If you have an extra computer lying around, especially one with a CD/DVD player, installing Linux couldn't be easier. With the live DVD, you can try it out and make sure all of your hardware works, and, then, installing is almost automatic.

 

IMO, Mint is most like Windows, but perhaps more importantly, many of us, here, use it, so we can be of more use to you than if you were running something none of us had ever tried.



#4 sikntired

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 11:19 AM

Thanks DeimosChaos and leithanne for your responses. Since the desktop is the only computer I have, I would most likely try installing with DVD initially. Then go from there when I feel accustomed. I don't want to get too technical and Mint sounds like the way to go.
 
BTW my computer specs are :    Windows 7 Professional Service Pack 1

System____

Processor: Pentium® Dual-Core CPU E5400 @ 2.70 GHz
2.70GHz

Installed Memory (RAM): 6.00 GB

System Type: 64-bit Operating System

 

I have several blank DVD+RW that I use for backing up will these do? They are 4.7GB.

 

Thanks again


Edited by sikntired, 30 September 2015 - 11:32 AM.


#5 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 11:49 AM

Yup those DVDs will be fine to do a Live DVD of Linux. Basically when you download the .iso of Linux Mint and burn it to the DVD you will be able to boot and try Linux without ever installing it to your hard drive. It will be a bit slower than actually having it installed but you will be able to try it and do everything you could as if it was installed. If you need help burning an .iso let us know!


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#6 mountainman75

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 01:07 PM

Thanks DeimosChaos and leithanne for your responses. Since the desktop is the only computer I have, I would most likely try installing with DVD initially. Then go from there when I feel accustomed. I don't want to get too technical and Mint sounds like the way to go.
 
BTW my computer specs are :    Windows 7 Professional Service Pack 1

System____

Processor: Pentium® Dual-Core CPU E5400 @ 2.70 GHz
2.70GHz

Installed Memory (RAM): 6.00 GB

System Type: 64-bit Operating System

 

I have several blank DVD+RW that I use for backing up will these do? They are 4.7GB.

 

Thanks again

 

Hello sikntired like you I am in the same age group. I have been dual booting Windows and Ubuntu for some time now. Like any OS linux is a learning curve. I would suggest starting with Mint and make sure you choose "Try without Installing" option. What size HD do you have?



#7 buddy215

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 02:36 PM

Regardless of whether you are a Septuagenarian, Methodist, Australian or Unitarian you can do this. :whistle:

 

Download this 64 bit download which is the latest release....Cinnamon...Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela...1.4 GB

When download is complete, Right-click on the ISO image and choose 'Open with > Windows Disc Image Burner'.

Select a disc burner (drive) and choose 'Burn'. If you check 'Verify disc after burning', it will confirm that the ISO image has been burned correctly.

 

Remove the DVD...put the DVD back in the CD-ROM drive and reboot the computer.

The computer should boot to the DVD.

DO NOT CHOOSE TO INSTALL...just run as Live.

I think at this point you will see the Firefox icon in bottom tray....click on it to see if you have internet connection and can cruise the web.

 

EDIT: that link is to Oklahoma U.'s server. I tested the speed earlier...it's fast and near the OP.


Edited by buddy215, 30 September 2015 - 08:43 PM.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#8 jonuk76

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 03:39 PM

I might have said this somewhere here before, but I set up a customised install of Linux Mint for my granddad who was well into his 9th decade.  We thought it best as he was using XP, after support ended, and going into his bank accounts etc..  I was quite sure that Linux Mint would be more familiar to a Windows XP user than Windows 8.1!  He had the odd issue at first, due to icons looking different, but overall he was very happy with how it ran and the customisation (I set it up with super large high contrast fonts and icons etc.). Basically all he did was use Firefox and Thunderbolt, which are pretty much identical on Linux or Windows.


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#9 pcpunk

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 08:13 PM

sikntired, In case you did not understand buddy215's link, you will have to scroll down just a little to where you see the word "Mirror" this is where the download will be.  Choose the country and the closest Mirror to you.


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#10 jargos

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 08:31 PM

Hello sikntired and welcome!

 

I originated the thread you refer to in your OP to tell folk of my Linux experience. Thanks for reading it.

 

You're in your seventies - I'm in my fifties. I cut my teeth on DOS .. remember that decades ago before it all got fancy .. backslash, file, copy .. and so on That's possibly one of the reasons why I'm drawn to Linux .. not that it can't be fancy if you want it to, but it's not necceesary. It just has the feel of what computing should be, not what an international conglomorate would like to force upon you, 'by hook or by crook' (I'm sure you will recognise that old saying).

 

On the surface, my experience so far has been that it's a fairly easy, straight forward, honest operating system. Not that I'm ever likely to get much past scratching the surface .. that's not my thing. I'm sure Linux has power and depth to it that I will never use or even get to know of - my purposes are fairly straight forward .. some business, lots of spreadsheets, some surfing, mail, document exchange .. all a piece of cake on Linux and with superb, free softwre to boot. No longer a servant to the likes of MSFT.

 

I would of course, not seek to help you or advise you in any way - others are doing that admirably. But my path has been an interesting one for me. In the end, after tasting Linux off a bootable US on my 'serious' computer, I found that the best thing to do was just pull out an old (but in good condition) machine, and go full Linux on that - and I am so happy I did - I won't repeat what I said on the other thread - it's there already.

 

I marvel at the willingness of folk around here to help others (such as you and me) for no reward. I guess that is the better parts of human nature.

 

Good luck with it all.


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Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


#11 buddy215

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 08:53 PM

pcpunk...weird...I tested that link to be sure it was a direct download. Just reset it...THANKS FOR CATCHING THAT...


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#12 sikntired

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 04:38 AM

Sorry for the delay in responding as I was requested to address some domestic issues (better known as 'honey-do's'). You know, 'happy wife', 'happy life', 'happy spouse', 'happy house'.

 

Now, down to subject matter.

 

@mountainman75, yes, I realize Linux will require a learning curve, as you so aptly put, and I'm up for that and hopefully, when comfortable with Linux-Mint, perhaps explore other horizons.

 

@buddy215 Ha Ha, thanks for the encouragement.  However, when using the link provided, it took me a while to figure out that I had to 'click' on 'Mirror" to download. I wasn't sure which one to select and I ended up selecting "Linux Freedom" . However, I noticed (after the fact) that you had edited the original post to include the closest download site of Oklahoma U's Server. Will this make a difference? The download seem to go OK but a little slow but did complete per the instructions you so graciously provided.

 

@jonuk76 That was very thoughtful and considerate to be of help to your granddad. 9th decade? How wonderful !! Maybe by then I will have mastered Mint, lol.

 

@jargos Yes thank you so much for posting your experience. After reading, I was inspired and motivated. Your response to this thread is appreciated as well as explaining your experience thus far. Just reinforces my resolve to take the plunge, so to speak.

 

@pcpunk  Thanks for the additional info, but unfortunately I did not see your comments till this A.M. And you probably have seen my response to buddy215.

 

Once again, thanks to all of you for your interest and willingness to help. I have successfully downloaded the .iso and will be trying it later today. Will keep you all abreast of my progress and or experiences and most likely a lot of questions that I cannot find answers to.



#13 buddy215

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 08:52 AM

Linux Freedom uses Lunarpages Internet Solutions for hosting the Linux ISOs. They get that free so that would explain the slow download. I have a perfect

excuse for screwing up the link....I'm a septuagenarian, too.

 

           

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Edited by buddy215, 01 October 2015 - 09:10 AM.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#14 sikntired

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 10:23 AM

Oookay buddy215, but no excuses are needed. Your heart and intentions were in the right place. Besides the objective was achieved.

 

Thanks so much for your help.



#15 pcpunk

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 04:27 PM

sikntired, Do you have many personal files on your Hard-drive? and if so are they all backed up?

 

Anything other than just booting a LiveLinuxDVD to test it out will be risking the Install you have now.  While Linux is a very good system in many different ways, interesting, fun, efficient and faster than Windows etc. it is a bit technical, and can damage your system if you are trying to install it and something goes wrong.  If you are the adventurous type, and don't mind spending some money on this hobby - you should really have a good Backup of your current system.  

1. First off-and most importantly, a Recovery Disk Set.

Hopefully you can make one of these if you have not done them yet, with usually 3-5 DVD-R's.  Or, they may have come with the pc? 

2. A backup of all your personal files and any important apps to Backup Drive or USB.

3. An External Backup Drive with at least one system Image on it.

This is the best to have around in addition to the Recovery Disk Set, because it is much faster to reinstall with this in the event you loose Windows 7.

 

Again, if you are just Test driving Linux via DVD or USB you should be fine - but at the least - you should have a Recovery Disk Set and backup your personal stuff.  We don't want to see you loose any important information or that horrible windows OS LOL-jab, jab Windows.  Like Jargos has said, linux will run very nicely on any windows 7 machine, he put his on an old Vista machine and is very impressed.  I am running on a 9yr old HP that flies with linux on it...an old XP machine.

 

Hope you enjoy linux but take it slow and ask as many questions as you need.


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