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Hardware names, how to look through?


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#1 Chris030

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 06:04 AM

Hi people,

 

As I'm looking across internal hardware, I find it quite confusing how things are called and to order them from oldest to newest.

I presume there is some logic behind the names, could someone enlighten me or link me to some good sites explaining that?

 

 

 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 01:19 PM

There is no logic to naming "hardware" that I've discerned...exactly what are you referring to? 

 

Louis



#3 Chris030

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 04:48 PM

I'm referring to, for example Intel's CPU's i5 ..., i7... and the graphics cards like NVidia's GT860, GT970,...

If there's no logic, then always look when the hardware came out and compare it to the others?

Are there good sites to compare CPU's, GPU's & etc.?



#4 hamluis

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 06:25 PM

Well...there are websites that compare various aspects of hardware components...which is not to say that such "comparison" is not slanted toward criteria which are essentially just number-crunching exercises that don't really give you an idea that A "outperforms" B, if that is what you are looking for.

 

Sites that come to mind:  Tom's Hardware, CPU Boss, PassMark.

 

The problem that I see with looking at the multiplicity of data that will be thrown at anyone...is that the reader doesn't often know if such-and-such is really pertinent to what he/she does on the computer.

 

If all a user does is surf...the slowest netbook does the job.  If a user edits/renders video...then that user should look for comparisons oriented toward the key factors involved.  There is no simple way to just look at specs/data and say...this component is "better" than that component...until you factor intended/anticipated use into the equation, IMO.

 

I think of this way...if I were to buy an auto with the best motor and which capable of 160 mph...where/when would I drive such auto in the U.S., where I live?

 

That's the best answer I can give you :).

 

Louis



#5 jonuk76

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 09:08 PM


I'm referring to, for example Intel's CPU's i5 ..., i7... and the graphics cards like NVidia's GT860, GT970,...

If there's no logic, then always look when the hardware came out and compare it to the others?

Are there good sites to compare CPU's, GPU's & etc.?

 

There's usually some sort of logic to naming within a particular brand line up.  Outside of that, it's just a bunch of numbers.  Is an AMD FX-6300 "higher" than an Intel i7-4790?  That's a rhetorical question as you can't tell just from the model number in that instance.  You'd need to look up a hardware site which compared their performance over various tasks.  To look at your specific examples:

 

Core i3, i5, i7 are a marketing name for some of Intel's CPU's.  Core i3 and i5 are classified as "mainstream" while i7 is "performance".  Pentium and Celeron are the economy models.  Currently, desktop i3's are all dual core with hyperthreading, i5's are quad core, and i7's are 4+ cores with hyperthreading.

 

The full model number will be something like i5-4690K.  The first number (4) indicates the generation (in this case a 4th generation "Haswell" processor, introduced 2013).  690 is just, as far as I know, a number without specific meaning, but it's higher than other models in the series, e.g. i5-4460 or i5-4590, which means it is clocked at a higher rate, and costs more than those two.  The K means it's "unlocked" which are aimed at enthusiast consumers and overclockers.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Core_i3_microprocessors

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Core_i5_microprocessors

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Core_i7_microprocessors

 

Nvidia's current naming scheme for Geforce GPU's is GT, GTX (or in past series GTS) followed by numbers which indicate generation, and it's place in the model lineup.  GTX in the name indicates it's a higher performance card (than GT and GTS cards).  The Ti suffix is a further modifier used on some cards, to indicate a higher performance version of the card.

 

Example: GTX460.  The GTX indicates a performance card.  The 4 indicates it's from the Geforce 400 series (introduced in 2010 - now discontinued).  60 indicates it's place in the line up, which is upper mid range, or lower high end depending on viewpoint.  It's higher than the GTS450 but lower than the GTX470, GTX480.

 

You can't really directly compare cards across different series, and GPU's advance quite quickly.  For example, a GTX480 was a high end $500 card from 2010, so how does it stack up against the mid range (from sub-$200) GTX960 of today?  Have a look.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units


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#6 Chris030

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 03:57 AM

@hamluis:

So, first the person has to think about what exactly he/she wants to do with their pc. Then, after that, he/she looks through the components which would suit their needs and then compare these and somehow look through all these numbers or read some reviews. Somewhat in this order?

If the person doesn't overclock, no need to buy an unlocked CPU right?

 

@jonuk76:

So there is some kind of logic within a particular brand! At least it's something. Thanks for the explanations, it now seems clearer to me.

 

Thanks to both of you for the provided links and site suggestions.



#7 hamluis

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 11:07 AM

Well...I have an unlocked CPU, but I don't overclock (overclocking is not something I consider important).  I purchased my CPU solely based on what I wanted (an upgrade over the X2 series) and the price point (I felt it was reasonable).

 

Louis






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