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How long does a clone drive last?


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#1 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 07:45 PM

So, I was looking for some solutions for how to backup properly, and I found out about this thing called a clone drive. It's like a Hard Drive, but it can clone everything on your hard drive and you an insert it into your PC and boot from it. So, I was wondering, how long will one of these things last? Would it be ok for me to keep it in my PC for a long time, using it like my regular HD, until it dies or should it be a temporary solution, until I get a new Drive?

          Thanks,

                        Dylan


Edited by CaveStoryKing64, 19 September 2015 - 07:46 PM.


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#2 packetanalyzer

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 07:51 PM

Cloning a drive is a bit by bit duplication of your original hard drive. The target drive must be at least the same size as the source drive. As far as the data is concerned it is exactly the same. Your target hard drive may or may not be the same as far as the hardware goes (e.g. different RPMs).

 

When you clone a drive it will be an exact copy of your original hard drive at the time you clone the drive. If you put the original hard drive back in your computer and continue to use that hard drive then over time the files on your cloned drive will become outdated just as a regular backup would. Understand a cloned drive is functionally similar to having restored a system image to a different hard drive.

 

Does that answer your question?



#3 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 10:58 PM

Cloning a drive is a bit by bit duplication of your original hard drive. The target drive must be at least the same size as the source drive. As far as the data is concerned it is exactly the same. Your target hard drive may or may not be the same as far as the hardware goes (e.g. different RPMs).

 

When you clone a drive it will be an exact copy of your original hard drive at the time you clone the drive. If you put the original hard drive back in your computer and continue to use that hard drive then over time the files on your cloned drive will become outdated just as a regular backup would. Understand a cloned drive is functionally similar to having restored a system image to a different hard drive.

 

Does that answer your question?

I am just asking how long an average Clone Drive lasts. I know regular Hard Drives last around 5 years, and I was wondering if it was the same for a clone. Thanks. 



#4 saw101

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 11:15 PM

For what it's worth....Unpredictable. Anything man-made is subject to failure at any given moment. Had a WD Scorpio HD fail totally after 8 months of light use. It was still under warranty but all the data was a wash. Other drives, with considerable use, have continued to hum along, still trouble free years later. You plunk your money down, cross your fingers & take your chances.


I never make the same mistake twice....I always make it 5 or 6 times just to be sure!


#5 jhayz

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 11:28 PM

I am just asking how long an average Clone Drive lasts.

 

A cloned drive is basically a combination of the hard drive containing the exact copy of your source drive. The data would be intact as long as your hard drive is physically healthy mechanically/electronically, bad sector free, properly kept in storage, temperature, handling and of course actual tested. There is no exact average life span on mechanical drives. The wear and tear is dependent on the usage mainly including ambient temperature.There are drives that lasts more than the expected life expectancy.


Tekken
 


#6 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 10:57 AM

For what it's worth....Unpredictable. Anything man-made is subject to failure at any given moment. Had a WD Scorpio HD fail totally after 8 months of light use. It was still under warranty but all the data was a wash. Other drives, with considerable use, have continued to hum along, still trouble free years later. You plunk your money down, cross your fingers & take your chances.

Thanks! This answers my question. So could someone please mark this as resolved? Thank You.



#7 packetanalyzer

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 01:21 PM

CaveStoryKing64,

For reference - and IMO this should be taken with a grain of salt, mean time between failures (MTBF) should be identified either on your hard drive or in the documentation for your hard drive. Some manufacturers are now using a new calculation, Annual Failure Rate (AFR).
 
MTBF is defined as "the probable average number of service hours between failures."1
 
AFR is defined as "the probable percent of failures per year, based on the manufacturer's total number of installed units of similar type."2

 

There are many different factors that go into determining how likely your drive will fail. Everything from manufacturer's defects to how many read write operations your perform to the climate conditions where you store the drive impact the actual lifespan of your drive.

 

Ars Technica has a good article about AFR here.

 

PC World has an article about a study that was conducted which found that hard drive failures are more frequent than estimated by manufacturers here.

 

So Saw is right in that it is unpredictable, but there are statistics that may give you an idea of how long your drive should last. You need to keep in mind though that is an estimate and many factors may result in a different real world answer concerning how long yours will function.



#8 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 05:01 PM

CaveStoryKing64,

For reference - and IMO this should be taken with a grain of salt, mean time between failures (MTBF) should be identified either on your hard drive or in the documentation for your hard drive. Some manufacturers are now using a new calculation, Annual Failure Rate (AFR).
 
MTBF is defined as "the probable average number of service hours between failures."1
 
AFR is defined as "the probable percent of failures per year, based on the manufacturer's total number of installed units of similar type."2

 

There are many different factors that go into determining how likely your drive will fail. Everything from manufacturer's defects to how many read write operations your perform to the climate conditions where you store the drive impact the actual lifespan of your drive.

 

Ars Technica has a good article about AFR here.

 

PC World has an article about a study that was conducted which found that hard drive failures are more frequent than estimated by manufacturers here.

 

So Saw is right in that it is unpredictable, but there are statistics that may give you an idea of how long your drive should last. You need to keep in mind though that is an estimate and many factors may result in a different real world answer concerning how long yours will function.

Ok, thanks! I'll research for a long time to get a high quality clone drive that will work for at least 5 years.






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