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Building a rig for Illustration purposes (Working with Photoshop CC)


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#1 Shah_Izzman

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 04:58 AM

Hi guys. I need to know if this rig is good for my purposes. I will use this build mostly for Illustration purposes (drawing/painting using graphics tablet), which is why I need a good CPU. 

I have a monitor, an Acer K272HL connecting through a DVI port. Will there be any problems running it?

I also want to know if I necessarily need a video card to run Photoshop CC or my monitor. If it isn't, I'd rather not buy it right now and purchase it down the road if I ever have an impending need to play games or 3D model.

 
CPU: Intel Core i5-4460 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor  ($175.88 @ OutletPC) 
Motherboard: Asus H97-PLUS ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($99.99 @ SuperBiiz) 
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  ($39.99 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 370 4GB Video Card  ($179.98 @ SuperBiiz) 
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit)  ($97.89 @ OutletPC) 
Total: $636.63
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

 

Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-18 05:56 EDT-0400

As for the PSU and Casing, I'm just going to buy whatever they have available that suits my computer. But will I need a CPU cooler or a Wireless Network Adapter?

Oh, an a question about gen 6 processors, are there any pros to upgrading to Skylake? I noticed that the i5-6400 is about the same price as an i5-4460. But the changes to the MoBos and RAM I would need seem too expensive and tedious without much improvement.



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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 12:32 PM

You don't necessarily need a video card for using Photoshop CC.  The i5-4460 has integrated Intel HD4600 graphics.   It will work fine with Photoshop and will run the screen no problem.  It's definitely sub-optimal for 3D work and games, but for 2D Photoshop work, it'll be OK.

 

 


As for the PSU and Casing, I'm just going to buy whatever they have available that suits my computer. But will I need a CPU cooler or a Wireless Network Adapter?

Oh, an a question about gen 6 processors, are there any pros to upgrading to Skylake? I noticed that the i5-6400 is about the same price as an i5-4460. But the changes to the MoBos and RAM I would need seem too expensive and tedious without much improvement.

 

 
I don't recommend buying the cheapest generic power supply available. It'll likely cause more problems.  Stick to reputable brands (Corsair, EVGA, XFX etc.) and choose a well designed case with good airflow.  You don't need an aftermarket CPU cooler.  One is supplied with the processor, which is designed to work with it.  Aftermarket coolers can be more efficient, and run with lower noise etc.  They are essential for overclocking, however that is not really applicable to the locked i5's.  As for the wireless network adapter, do you need to connect to a wireless network?  If yes, then you need one.  If you will be using a wired connection then no.
 
Skylake processors come with more advanced integrated GPU's.  The HD 530 seems to be roughly comparable in graphics performance to AMD's top end APU's like the A10-7870K.  They offer roughly 10% per clock better CPU performance compared to Haswell, while using less power.  Not all the motherboards are expensive and not all of them require the new DDR4 memory (but I understand low voltage DDR3L is recommended for Skylake).
 

An interesting CPU for this type of build could be the Broadwell i5-5675C, which has integrated Iris Pro graphics which give comparable performance to a GTX 750 card, while consuming similar power levels to the Skylake i5's.  However, from what I can see it's neither widely available or cheap, unfortunately.

 

Example using Skylake without GPU, with 16Gb memory:

 

 
Motherboard: Asus H170-PLUS D3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard  ($92.99 @ SuperBiiz) 
Memory: Mushkin ECO2 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  ($76.99 @ Newegg) 
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit)  ($97.89 @ OutletPC) 
Total: $506.76
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-09-18 14:19 EDT-0400

Edited by jonuk76, 18 September 2015 - 01:19 PM.

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#3 SEANIA

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 11:32 AM

System without the added GPU should only need a 350 watt PSU. Even that is a little overkill, but they don't make quality PSUs in smaller wattage then that. 

 

If you plan on using a touch screen for drawing later, most touch screens require being connected to a displayport video out to work. If that's the case then make sure whatever motherboard you use has that, and If not then don't worry about it.

 

Skylake also runs a lot cooler. Means your room won't be as hot with the computer on.


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#4 Shah_Izzman

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 11:15 PM

CPU: Intel Core i5-6400 2.7GHz Quad-Core Processor  ($195.99 @ B&H) 

Motherboard: Asus H170-PLUS D3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard  ($92.99 @ SuperBiiz) 
Memory: Mushkin ECO2 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  ($76.99 @ Newegg) 
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit)  ($97.89 @ OutletPC) 

 

 

Thank you thank you thank you! This really helps out a lot. I don't know if that memory is available around here but I'm sure I can find something to suit it.

 

If you plan on using a touch screen for drawing later, most touch screens require being connected to a displayport video out to work. If that's the case then make sure whatever motherboard you use has that, and If not then don't worry about it.

 

I'm fairly sure Intuos has touch-capabilities and it run through USB. I hate touch screen though. Doubt anyone ever uses it for drawing.



#5 SEANIA

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 12:39 PM

I hate touch screen though. Doubt anyone ever uses it for drawing.

 They make specific touch/pen screens for drawing. They're a lot more accurate then standard touch screens and are much bigger (24 inch compared to 6 to 12 inch tablets). The pricing also reflects those two.  

 

Some use USB in combination with DVI, HDMI, or VGA, but others will only accept displayport as a connection median. Which is weird because the only reason they use displayport is because it has USB connectivity built into the line instead of having to use a separate cable. Much like how HDMI has digital audio built into it but DVI traditionally doesn't and would have to be paired with a optic cable to get digital data transferred.


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#6 jonuk76

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 02:53 PM

 

CPU: Intel Core i5-6400 2.7GHz Quad-Core Processor  ($195.99 @ B&H) 

Motherboard: Asus H170-PLUS D3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard  ($92.99 @ SuperBiiz) 
Memory: Mushkin ECO2 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  ($76.99 @ Newegg) 
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM (64-bit)  ($97.89 @ OutletPC) 

 

 

Thank you thank you thank you! This really helps out a lot. I don't know if that memory is available around here but I'm sure I can find something to suit it.

 

You're welcome.  DDR3L is getting a bit more common now, and several manufacturers are making it.  The thing to look for is that the voltage on this memory is 1.35v rather than 1.5v on standard DDR3.


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