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Folder Permission Issues


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#1 pcpunk

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 09:58 AM

I just need to test Uploading some screenshots after possibly changing my Desktop Folder Permissions.  

Explanation: I was in LiveLinuxDVD and wanted to save a screenshot to my HDD Linux Install.  When I tried, it would not let me.  I chose to Right Click on My Desktop Folder>Root Actions>Ownership to Active User, and then it let me save to my HDD Desktop Folder.  Then I could not Upload those screenshots while on my HDD Install, so now I am trying this again after checking all Permissions. 

 

 I took a look at Desktop Folder Permissions and compared them to ones from the same distro on LivelinuxDVD and they matched, but was still having issues with screenshots Uploading from Desktop.  So just using this post to see if I still have an issue.

 

Also, any advice when I am in LiveLinuxDVD and want to save stuff to my HDD?  In the future I will save to USB.  I have done this before - but too Windows.  O, and using tinypic.

 

 juv5up.png


Edited by pcpunk, 16 September 2015 - 10:02 AM.

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#2 pcpunk

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:01 AM

Okay, it's working Whew!

 

That's a pic of LM-KDE-17.2-64bit at Idle on my 9yr. old HP.  Was just wanting to make some comparisons.


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#3 Al1000

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:45 AM

Also, any advice when I am in LiveLinuxDVD and want to save stuff to my HDD?


Save as root, then change ownership to your normal user when you boot into the operating system on your HDD.

#4 pcpunk

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:07 AM

I will try and replicate your instructions when in LiveDVD.  If I understand right, I would Change the Folder Permissions on HDD to "Ownership to Root", by Right Clicking on it > "Root Actions" then "Ownership to Root", from LiveDVD.  Then boot into Internal install and Right Click again and choose "Ownership to Active User" 

 

Thanks Al!


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#5 DeimosChaos

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:25 AM

I would think you would just save it as root user when in Live DVD then when you are in your HDD install you change permissions back to your normal user (via the root user).


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#6 pcpunk

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:49 AM

@DeimosChaos, I will try this later my friend!


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#7 DeimosChaos

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:55 AM

That was my interpretation of AI's suggestion!  :bounce:

 

I believe that would work... at least it should? Lol.


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#8 Al1000

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 01:48 PM

I'm not sure about right-clicking and "root actions" etc. I would use terminal. Copy it over to your HDD:

sudo cp /path/to/screenshot /media/path/to/HDD/directory/

Then when you next boot into the operating system on your HDD:

sudo chown pcpunk:pcpunk /path/to/screenshot

Job done. :)


Edited by Al1000, 16 September 2015 - 01:50 PM.


#9 pcpunk

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 04:44 PM

Things were working as far as I could tell, but this is what I did because the Folder looked like this:

See how the Drop downs are Not Highlighted?  Well, I went to "Root Actions" > "Ownership to Active User" and now it looks like the second pic.

ayu3w1.png

20tkx74.png


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#10 mremski

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 05:33 PM

When you are sharing a "data" disk between multiple versions, you need to make sure that user/group are the same.  Pics above show user: chris and group: chris.   On another version of the os, chris may not be the same chris.

 

Confused yet?   :devil:

 

do "cat /etc/passwd | grep -i chris", make a note of the first number on both systems,  they should match.  now do "cat /etc/group | grep -i chris" and note the number (do on both systems) they should match.    That means your user/group names match between the 2 versions;  if they don't then you can run into weird issues because "chris is not chris"

 

(man passwd and man group for more understanding)


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#11 pcpunk

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 06:37 PM

Yes very confused LOL.

 

I think all is good, because I changed the Permissions while in my Main OS, from User 999 and Group 999 (which must be Mint KDE 17.2 Default) - Back to Chris Chris, and, had to use my Password to do this, would think this is good enough.  This is also what my other Folders look like.

 

Will running this command be safe? and passwd, is just that, and not actual password.  Thanks for your concern.

 

"cat /etc/passwd | grep -i chris"


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#12 DeimosChaos

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 08:41 PM

So basically you are just cating out your /etc/passwd file. Which all that it does is store information for when you log in. Check this out. Typically your password is encrypted and stored in the /etc/shadow file. The link mentions about the shadow file as well.


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#13 mremski

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:14 AM

To expand on what DC said:

The cat command is used to dump a file to stdout (typically the console or terminal window).  If you have file in your home directory name "stuff.txt" that contains "How now brown cow, have you any milk today?", when you enter the command:

cat stuff.txt

you'll see

How now brown cow, have you any milk today?

on your terminal.

 

The "|" is the pipe command;  it takes the stdout from one command and uses it as the stdin for another (stdout is standard output, stdin is standard input).

 

"grep" is a command that does pattern matching on it's input (go  ahead and google up "what does grep stand for")

 

/etc/passwd is just a file that contains information to use when you log into a system.  No, it does not contain that passwords, yes passwords are actually encrypted.

/etc/group is just a file that contains information about the groups in a system, groups affect what files can be accessed (file permissions).

 

So what the commands that I gave you do:

"dump the output of the /etc/passwd file, pipe it to the input of the grep command, the grep command is searching for the string "chris", ignoring case".

Second one is same thing only using /etc/group file.

 

Now, you're asking why?

user id and group id are really just number assigned when users and groups are created.  Most Linux distributions start user ids at 1001, and create a group id with the same name, again typically starting at 1001.  So if you are the only user account created, you're probably ok, if you are the first one created on one system you may get chris as 1001, but if another system has you as the fourth user you may get chris as 1004.  That can cause problems because now "chris is not chris"

 

:)


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#14 pcpunk

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 10:45 AM

@mremski:  I was using a LiveLinuxDVD at the time, not a dual boot if that is what you were thinking.   Here is the output on my main install.  Sorry guys this is all way over my head, I'm trying to understand it though.
 
So is this telling me that I am all good > chris:x:1000
 
chris@chris-HP-Compaq-nx7400-EN352UTR-ABA:~ > cat /etc/passwd | grep -i chris
chris:x:1000:1000:chris,,,:/home/chris:/bin/bash
chris@chris-HP-Compaq-nx7400-EN352UTR-ABA:~ > 
 
chris@chris-HP-Compaq-nx7400-EN352UTR-ABA:~ > cat /etc/group | grep -i chris
adm:x:4:syslog,chris
cdrom:x:24:chris
sudo:x:27:chris
dip:x:30:chris
plugdev:x:46:chris
lpadmin:x:108:chris
sambashare:x:111:chris
chris:x:1000:
 
Let me understand this:  What does the word "dump" mean in this situation?  I don't want to dump anything!! LOL.  In this situation does "dump" mean show in Terminal?
 
@mremski

So what the commands that I gave you do:

"dump the output of the /etc/passwd file, pipe it to the input of the grep command, the grep command is searching for the string "chris", ignoring case".

Second one is same thing only using /etc/group file.


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#15 DeimosChaos

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 10:53 AM

 

 
 
Let me understand this:  What does the word "dump" mean in this situation?  I don't want to dump anything!! LOL.  In this situation does "dump" mean show in Terminal?
 
@mremski

So what the commands that I gave you do:

"dump the output of the /etc/passwd file, pipe it to the input of the grep command, the grep command is searching for the string "chris", ignoring case".

Second one is same thing only using /etc/group file.

 

 

Haha, yeah. mremski meant "dump" as in to show on temrinal. "Dump" is a pretty widely (at least where I work) used term with anyone using unix on a daily basis to show some kind of output to the terminal window. I use it myself quite often.


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