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What do you look for when buying a PC or Laptop?


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#1 Easy John

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 08:54 PM

I'll be buying either a PC or Laptop pretty soon, but would like to get some opinions on what you guys would look for if it were you. It's really just for general use... nothing like gaming or for use with graphics packages; I've heard they require some pretty crazy high tech gear.

To be more specific, what hardware/software is a must? Really, I want to start fresh, this time taking care of the thing; I'm taking nothing from the computer I'm using right now (stuff may be infected from viruses, etc.), which I've had for many years.

Oh, and what's best, to purchase from some electrical store, or just get one custom made from somewhere?



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#2 Atomic77

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 10:44 PM

Ok this is easy peasy. I just bought a new pc in DECEMBER 2014. I am going to tell you look for something with at least a Intel core i5 processor  get as much ram as you can afford no less then 4gb. Os will probably be Windows 8.1 or 10. For Basic needs I recommend the HP envy 700-414 which is what I use.


Edited by Atomic77, 15 September 2015 - 10:46 PM.

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#3 SEANIA

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 10:46 PM

When I look for a new laptop for me I usually get one between 400$ and 450$ USD. I only buy new laptops. I play games a lot so I base my choice off of what has the beefiest graphics. I make sure it has a full sized keyboard. I don't mind if it has skimpier parts else where as long as they're replaceable and use a standardized connector. In fact what I buy is usually barely more then a bare bones laptop. Most importantly I always make sure the laptop I'm buying is running on the latest generation of hardware, as sites/stores tend to often carry laptops that are multiple years out of date. That's bout it- for my personal use.

 

My current laptop, stock, was 450$ brand new, sticker price. It has a AMD A6-6310 quad core as its CPU, a AMD R5 m240 dedicated video card with 1GB of dedicated VRAM, and a 1366x768 resolution TN panel. It had 4GB of RAM stock, a single band wireless card with terrible range, and a 500GB 5200RPM HDD, but has since been upgraded to 6GB of RAM, a strong dual band wireless card, and a 240GB SSD. Also added in a DVD drive as it had none but had a empty slot for it. 

 

All parts added were spares from salvaging dead computers, so you can see why I buy stripped down laptops. A note about it is that at the time I bought it, AMD hadn't officially released the R5 M240, and didn't for a good 5 months. That's how new the parts were. 

 

 

When I recommend a laptop to someone else, 1: I only ever recommend ASUS or Lenovo as brands to buy. There are other brands/manufactures (not to say they all suck, and some I may be unaware of and are really good), but most of them are either garbage quality, way overpriced, or only use proprietary connectors/parts to that brand making repair bills cost twice as much as they should and upgrading near impossible.

 

2: Outside of brand. Always make sure the laptop you're buying actually has laptop parts. Cheaper laptops tend to not even use laptop parts, and instead use tablet or even phone parts in them- making them useless as a laptop as the parts either aren't powerful enough to run full windows applications (as they weren't designed to), or plain aren't compatible with most applications and/or don't run windows. At that point it's just a tablet with no touch screen and a permanently attached keyboard. 

 

3: I tell them not to bother with anything over 499$ for regular use.

 

4: With the past three things in mind I'd look for anything that has at least a 128GB SSD as the main drive and doesn't use a regular mechanical HDD. The amount of speed and snappiness that the SSD brings will make the 400$ laptop feel like a 850$ laptop.  Am dead serious about how much an SSD helps with everyday use. Yeah it's not as much storage per dollar, but it's worth every file I can't fit on the SSD just to have it. 

 

5: I do this for myself, and if I'm acting as a middle man to buy a laptop for someone else. First thing I do with a new laptop- reinstall the whole thing from scratch. With windows 8 and 10 there's now a easy to use windows reinstall button in settings. 


Edited by SEANIA, 15 September 2015 - 10:51 PM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#4 Easy John

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 04:17 PM

When I look for a new laptop for me I usually get one between 400$ and 450$ USD. I only buy new laptops. I play games a lot so I base my choice off of what has the beefiest graphics. I make sure it has a full sized keyboard. I don't mind if it has skimpier parts else where as long as they're replaceable and use a standardized connector. In fact what I buy is usually barely more then a bare bones laptop. Most importantly I always make sure the laptop I'm buying is running on the latest generation of hardware, as sites/stores tend to often carry laptops that are multiple years out of date. That's bout it- for my personal use.

 

My current laptop, stock, was 450$ brand new, sticker price. It has a AMD A6-6310 quad core as its CPU, a AMD R5 m240 dedicated video card with 1GB of dedicated VRAM, and a 1366x768 resolution TN panel. It had 4GB of RAM stock, a single band wireless card with terrible range, and a 500GB 5200RPM HDD, but has since been upgraded to 6GB of RAM, a strong dual band wireless card, and a 240GB SSD. Also added in a DVD drive as it had none but had a empty slot for it. 

 

All parts added were spares from salvaging dead computers, so you can see why I buy stripped down laptops. A note about it is that at the time I bought it, AMD hadn't officially released the R5 M240, and didn't for a good 5 months. That's how new the parts were. 

 

 

When I recommend a laptop to someone else, 1: I only ever recommend ASUS or Lenovo as brands to buy. There are other brands/manufactures (not to say they all suck, and some I may be unaware of and are really good), but most of them are either garbage quality, way overpriced, or only use proprietary connectors/parts to that brand making repair bills cost twice as much as they should and upgrading near impossible.

 

2: Outside of brand. Always make sure the laptop you're buying actually has laptop parts. Cheaper laptops tend to not even use laptop parts, and instead use tablet or even phone parts in them- making them useless as a laptop as the parts either aren't powerful enough to run full windows applications (as they weren't designed to), or plain aren't compatible with most applications and/or don't run windows. At that point it's just a tablet with no touch screen and a permanently attached keyboard. 

 

3: I tell them not to bother with anything over 499$ for regular use.

 

4: With the past three things in mind I'd look for anything that has at least a 128GB SSD as the main drive and doesn't use a regular mechanical HDD. The amount of speed and snappiness that the SSD brings will make the 400$ laptop feel like a 850$ laptop.  Am dead serious about how much an SSD helps with everyday use. Yeah it's not as much storage per dollar, but it's worth every file I can't fit on the SSD just to have it. 

 

5: I do this for myself, and if I'm acting as a middle man to buy a laptop for someone else. First thing I do with a new laptop- reinstall the whole thing from scratch. With windows 8 and 10 there's now a easy to use windows reinstall button in settings. 

 

 

Wow! This is a lot of info! Much appreciated!

 

Just to get a better idea, I'll just throw out a bunch of questions as they come to mind. You can be as succinct as you like because, really, I'm just looking for the general idea behind stuff. The laptop is really just for things like surfing the web, emails, youtube vids, etc..

 

 

 

If it's not a full-sized keyboard, what exactly is missing? Important keys?

 

What do you mean standardized connector? Is this for adding additional, external, devices to something that's more or less bare-bones?

 

I'm guessing I should look for a laptop with the latest software packages, right? Like one with Windows 10... I heard there were problems with freezing, or something like that with Windows 10.

 

Should I even bother with all the other additions I could be offered at higher prices, like anti-virus, etc.? Most people I hear nowadays talk about just getting all that stuff free from Avast, or whatever.

 

What ports/connectors should I look out for in this modern day?

 

What do you mean 'latest generations hardware'? I'm guessing I should just look out for a relatively new model of a good make that seems to fit the bill, right?

 

Should I ever need to upgrade the laptop for any reason? Wouldn't it be best to just buy another one in a few years time? Sort of, in with the new, out with the old.

 

How can I tell the difference between something that has laptop parts and something that doesn't? What exactly are 'laptop parts'?

 

What do you mean have the SSD as the 'main drive'? Is it a standard nowadays to have multiple drives in one machine?

 

What's the advantage to reinstalling things from scratch?



#5 Easy John

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 04:19 PM

Ok this is easy peasy. I just bought a new pc in DECEMBER 2014. I am going to tell you look for something with at least a Intel core i5 processor  get as much ram as you can afford no less then 4gb. Os will probably be Windows 8.1 or 10. For Basic needs I recommend the HP envy 700-414 which is what I use.

 

Thanks for the reply...

 

What exactly is the advantage to having that much RAM? Does it mean I can do a hell of a lot more at one time?



#6 SEANIA

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 07:32 PM

Forget to mention I look for one that has a removable battery. Makes it easy to replace if it goes bad, and if I spill something on my laptop I can quickly remove all power from it to keep it from frying. 

 

I'll try to answer these in order...numbering them to. 

1: If it's not a full-sized keyboard, what exactly is missing? Important keys?

2: What do you mean standardized connector? Is this for adding additional, external, devices to something that's more or less bare-bones?

3: I'm guessing I should look for a laptop with the latest software packages, right? Like one with Windows 10... I heard there were problems with freezing, or something like that with Windows 10.

4: Should I even bother with all the other additions I could be offered at higher prices, like anti-virus, etc.? Most people I hear nowadays talk about just getting all that stuff free from Avast, or whatever.

5: What ports/connectors should I look out for in this modern day?

6:What do you mean 'latest generations hardware'? I'm guessing I should just look out for a relatively new model of a good make that seems to fit the bill, right?

7: Should I ever need to upgrade the laptop for any reason? Wouldn't it be best to just buy another one in a few years time? Sort of, in with the new, out with the old.

8: How can I tell the difference between something that has laptop parts and something that doesn't? What exactly are 'laptop parts'?

9: What do you mean have the SSD as the 'main drive'? Is it a standard nowadays to have multiple drives in one machine?

10:What's the advantage to reinstalling things from scratch?

1: It's mostly a personal preference. Some flash game do rely on the number pad, and other strategy games I like use them as shortcuts for various commands. I also love using it to type out numbers instead of using the top row keys.

 

2: 

Basically nothing that would effect standard use- USB, HDMI, VGA, Ethernet, headphone jacks, ect are usually never changed. The connectors they do change are ones that various parts connect to that'd you'd normally never have to change/remove. They make replacement parts, repairs, and upgrades more expensive and harder to do. 

 

3: Newest operating system is good to shoot for. If they say something like "free upgrade to windows 10" that's also fine and is legit.

 

4: If you mean included software, then don't. If a laptop/desktop advertises included software it's usually never a good thing, and it's only included because the maker of that software paid the laptop/desktop maker to include it. Best to think of it as a pre-loaded add.

 

There's a lot of bad antivirus software- 99.9% chance they preloaded a crap one because the makers paid them. The best free anti-virus is commonly considered to be "Avast". The best paid anti-virus is commonly agreed to be "Kaspersky".  You can look up reviews on Kaspersky for yourself. 

 

5: USB 3.0 port (as long as it has one that's good enough), HDMI connector, 1/8" headphone jack and microphone jack (a combo jack is fine), Ethernet jack, DVD drive, and a SD card slot.

 

USB type C is starting to be used as a power connector- don't fret if it's not on a laptop as it's cutting edge new, but if it does it's a huge plus. SD card slots don't get included much, but it is useful instead of having to buy a USB adapter for it. Same for DVD drives.

 

6: I mean one that uses a CPU released within the current or past year- as of this post 2014 and 2015 CPUs, with 2015 being the preference. You can just google the CPU model to find out if it is. 

 

7: For what you're doing it's not worth buying a new one every other year. Even a decent 450$ laptop from 2008 is still good for that if it has at least 4GB of RAM and is blazing fast if upgraded to a SSD. What you gain from buying a new laptop that often (for what you do) is slightly better battery life. (common battery life use to be 2 1.2 hours for 2008, now it's at least 5 hours.)

 

For upgrades. It is worth doing for the thing I just metioned^. CPU requirements, for simple tasks like you want, move slowly. So investing in some cheap upgrades in other areas of it can make it (seemingly) just as fast or faster then a new laptop would be two years down the line. 

 

8: uhg uhhh this is a bit harder to answer without saying "just know what the model numbers mean", but i'll try my best. I haven't ever seen anything over 400$ use non laptop parts.

 

If it uses a Intel CPU, anything that isn't classed with a prefix of i3, i5, or i7. Avoid- Pentium, Celeron, Atom, and "Core m". With the last one make sure it's a prefix as they'll throw a "m" onto the end of some regular laptop CPU names regardless of prefix. 

 

They make some Pentiums and Celerons that are still laptop grade (they're a cut down versions of a i3), but they also started classifying a lot of their low power tablet and mini server chips that get cut down as those to. It's not supper easy to look up if you don't know what you're suppose to be looking at.

 

For AMD. Their normal powered laptop part classes to look into have a prefix of- A6, A8, A10, and FX. The ones to avoid from them are- A4, E, E1, E2, C, and Z. 

 

9: Higher end laptops will sometimes have multiple drives (starts at 550$ I think), but that's not what I'm referring to. What I am referring to is that some laptops have a really small secondary drive that's a SSD (4GB-32GB) that they'll use in conjunction with the main HDD. Then they'll proceed to claim that the laptop uses a SSD. While technically right, it doesn't give speed of what using a SSD as a main drive would do. 

 

10: That software thing I mentioned in #4? There are very few laptops that don't come preloaded with a bunch of stuff like that. Microsoft has even said they were going to hand out certifications (in the form of a stick on the laptop) for laptops/devices that don't do this. 

 

The reinstall is to get rid of all that preloaded software that can slow the computer down. It can be embedded pretty deep and the only way to be sure it's gone is to do a reinstall. 

 

 

Think I answered everything. 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#7 Easy John

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 09:01 PM

Forget to mention I look for one that has a removable battery. Makes it easy to replace if it goes bad, and if I spill something on my laptop I can quickly remove all power from it to keep it from frying. 

 

I'll try to answer these in order...numbering them to. 

1: If it's not a full-sized keyboard, what exactly is missing? Important keys?

2: What do you mean standardized connector? Is this for adding additional, external, devices to something that's more or less bare-bones?

3: I'm guessing I should look for a laptop with the latest software packages, right? Like one with Windows 10... I heard there were problems with freezing, or something like that with Windows 10.

4: Should I even bother with all the other additions I could be offered at higher prices, like anti-virus, etc.? Most people I hear nowadays talk about just getting all that stuff free from Avast, or whatever.

5: What ports/connectors should I look out for in this modern day?

6:What do you mean 'latest generations hardware'? I'm guessing I should just look out for a relatively new model of a good make that seems to fit the bill, right?

7: Should I ever need to upgrade the laptop for any reason? Wouldn't it be best to just buy another one in a few years time? Sort of, in with the new, out with the old.

8: How can I tell the difference between something that has laptop parts and something that doesn't? What exactly are 'laptop parts'?

9: What do you mean have the SSD as the 'main drive'? Is it a standard nowadays to have multiple drives in one machine?

10:What's the advantage to reinstalling things from scratch?

1: It's mostly a personal preference. Some flash game do rely on the number pad, and other strategy games I like use them as shortcuts for various commands. I also love using it to type out numbers instead of using the top row keys.

 

2: 

Basically nothing that would effect standard use- USB, HDMI, VGA, Ethernet, headphone jacks, ect are usually never changed. The connectors they do change are ones that various parts connect to that'd you'd normally never have to change/remove. They make replacement parts, repairs, and upgrades more expensive and harder to do. 

 

3: Newest operating system is good to shoot for. If they say something like "free upgrade to windows 10" that's also fine and is legit.

 

4: If you mean included software, then don't. If a laptop/desktop advertises included software it's usually never a good thing, and it's only included because the maker of that software paid the laptop/desktop maker to include it. Best to think of it as a pre-loaded add.

 

There's a lot of bad antivirus software- 99.9% chance they preloaded a crap one because the makers paid them. The best free anti-virus is commonly considered to be "Avast". The best paid anti-virus is commonly agreed to be "Kaspersky".  You can look up reviews on Kaspersky for yourself. 

 

5: USB 3.0 port (as long as it has one that's good enough), HDMI connector, 1/8" headphone jack and microphone jack (a combo jack is fine), Ethernet jack, DVD drive, and a SD card slot.

 

USB type C is starting to be used as a power connector- don't fret if it's not on a laptop as it's cutting edge new, but if it does it's a huge plus. SD card slots don't get included much, but it is useful instead of having to buy a USB adapter for it. Same for DVD drives.

 

6: I mean one that uses a CPU released within the current or past year- as of this post 2014 and 2015 CPUs, with 2015 being the preference. You can just google the CPU model to find out if it is. 

 

7: For what you're doing it's not worth buying a new one every other year. Even a decent 450$ laptop from 2008 is still good for that if it has at least 4GB of RAM and is blazing fast if upgraded to a SSD. What you gain from buying a new laptop that often (for what you do) is slightly better battery life. (common battery life use to be 2 1.2 hours for 2008, now it's at least 5 hours.)

 

For upgrades. It is worth doing for the thing I just metioned^. CPU requirements, for simple tasks like you want, move slowly. So investing in some cheap upgrades in other areas of it can make it (seemingly) just as fast or faster then a new laptop would be two years down the line. 

 

8: uhg uhhh this is a bit harder to answer without saying "just know what the model numbers mean", but i'll try my best. I haven't ever seen anything over 400$ use non laptop parts.

 

If it uses a Intel CPU, anything that isn't classed with a prefix of i3, i5, or i7. Avoid- Pentium, Celeron, Atom, and "Core m". With the last one make sure it's a prefix as they'll throw a "m" onto the end of some regular laptop CPU names regardless of prefix. 

 

They make some Pentiums and Celerons that are still laptop grade (they're a cut down versions of a i3), but they also started classifying a lot of their low power tablet and mini server chips that get cut down as those to. It's not supper easy to look up if you don't know what you're suppose to be looking at.

 

For AMD. Their normal powered laptop part classes to look into have a prefix of- A6, A8, A10, and FX. The ones to avoid from them are- A4, E, E1, E2, C, and Z. 

 

9: Higher end laptops will sometimes have multiple drives (starts at 550$ I think), but that's not what I'm referring to. What I am referring to is that some laptops have a really small secondary drive that's a SSD (4GB-32GB) that they'll use in conjunction with the main HDD. Then they'll proceed to claim that the laptop uses a SSD. While technically right, it doesn't give speed of what using a SSD as a main drive would do. 

 

10: That software thing I mentioned in #4? There are very few laptops that don't come preloaded with a bunch of stuff like that. Microsoft has even said they were going to hand out certifications (in the form of a stick on the laptop) for laptops/devices that don't do this. 

 

The reinstall is to get rid of all that preloaded software that can slow the computer down. It can be embedded pretty deep and the only way to be sure it's gone is to do a reinstall. 

 

 

Think I answered everything. 

 

Thanks for getting back to me... I think I have a better understanding of things. Some things are still unclear.

 

I'll do the numbers thing too to make things easier

 

1. So is it just numbers that are missing in the smaller keyboards?

 

3. Do you know of any of the problems people keep going on about with Windows 10? All I know is that some people have it freeze on them, or that something happens and they can't power the machine down.

 

5. What's the need for SD cards, anyway? Why are they important? Is it just in the event I'll need to take stuff from some SD card in the future? Also, what is USB Type C?



#8 SEANIA

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 01:15 AM

Thanks for getting back to me... I think I have a better understanding of things. Some things are still unclear.

 

I'll do the numbers thing too to make things easier

 

1. So is it just numbers that are missing in the smaller keyboards?

 

3. Do you know of any of the problems people keep going on about with Windows 10? All I know is that some people have it freeze on them, or that something happens and they can't power the machine down.

 

5. What's the need for SD cards, anyway? Why are they important? Is it just in the event I'll need to take stuff from some SD card in the future? Also, what is USB Type C?

 

 

1: Yes. The other keys that are usually there (Home, pg up, pg dn, ECT) are shifted further in or become shift functions of other keys. 

 

2: It just got released so some launch bugs are bound to be about (Microsoft "let go" a large portion of their testing/debug team). In a few moths time I'm sure the problems will be solved. The times I do get blue screens/freezes only seem to happen when I'm trying to close out a program. So not really a loss.

 

3: Phones use them, camcorders use them, cameras use them, and many other small devices use them as a form of removable storage. It's not a absolute to die for port to have on a laptop since you can just use a USB adapter, but it's extremely useful if you use SD cards a lot to have a dedicated port for. They transfer data faster over a dedicated port, and there is a certain OCD level of pleasure when you get that satisfying click from pushing it into a real SD card slot instead of a adapter. 

 

USB type C... currently we have:

Type A- The standard USB port that is used on a "host device" IE a laptop or desktop- what you're plugging other devices into. Comes in revisions  1.0, 2.0 , 3.0, and 3.1. The higher revisions add more bandwidth and 3.1 adds more power as well. Each is backwards compatible, and most devices with a higher revision port (say a USB 3.0 flash drive) also function when put into a lower revision port (putting that 3.0 flash drive into a 2.0 port) be it at slower transfer speeds. 

 

Type B- Type B are USB ports meant to be on peripheral devices- Cellphones, external hard drives, mouses, keyboards, gamepads, printers, ECT

There's mini B  (often used on external hard drives and the PS3 controller), micro B (your phones USB), and standard B (the USB often used with printers). 

 

Type C- This is not a simple re-size and is made to replace all current USB plugs, but is backwards compatible with the other versions and can function as a simple type A or B port if you get a adapter to make what you're plugging in fit (it detects what you're plugging in is a older type, and functions in a different way to accommodate it)

 

What it adds is tremendous.

 

It's a reversible plug- lot less fiddling round in the dark.

 

It has a much much higher ceiling to the amount of power that can be pushed through it. Up to 100 watts of power now (most standard laptops don't use more then 50) instead of the current USB 3.0 max of 4.5 watts. 

 

It's a relatively small port to begin with so there will be no need to re-size it in the future. All devices would use not only the same standard (usb), but the same physical plug now (no need to have six differently shaped cords to use all your devices).

 

It can carry more data. 1.0 maxed at 12 Mbit/s (1.5 megabyte), 2.0 maxed at 480 Mbit/s (60 mega bytes), and 3.0 maxed at 5,000 Mbit (625 megabytes), but type C does 10Gbit/s (1250 megabytes). To put that in perspective a regular internal HDD typically maxes out at 128-ish megabytes sec, a current standard SSD on the same connector does around 512 megabytes a sec, and a SSD on a specialized port does around 1024 megabytes a sec with some high performance enterprise grade ones doing 1500. 

 

It can act as a video out, but it's not it's own video type that you need to go by all new stuff for. It instead acts as a Display port out. Which is a connector that has been around since 2008 and adapters from it to a standard HDMI, DVI, or VGA out are all of 25$. Displayport is the best video connector used, and does transfer audio over it like HDMI, but also transfers USB data and has a higher resolution limit then any other standard video connector currently used.

 

It can act as a thunderbolt port, which adds external PCIe lane access. Means you can now externally add anything that would normally have to be installed inside your computer to use it- yes, that means you can connect a desktop grade graphics card to a laptop, and it's a standard ability. It doesn't do it through some proprietary port that only a specific model of laptop has, or a jury rigged setup to work, it's a regular standardized function with the right adapter.

 

USB 3.1 was released along side type C and adds the 10Gbit speed and a little more power. It's purpose seems to be to act like a stand-in while everything shifts to type C, or perhaps to act as a more standard backwards compatible port along side type C since it's physically the same shape/size so you won't have to buy new cords for your stuff or a adapter. 

 

Type C is great as it standardizes everything(!!!!!!!!) into one external connector instead of six. 

Type C is the way of the future for all mobile devices and external paraphernalia, but expect a good 4 years before it actually takes hold like that. Maybe longer, but it's not something to worry about right now. 


Edited by SEANIA, 17 September 2015 - 01:20 AM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#9 Kilroy

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 05:45 PM

Personally I don't buy laptops.  I only recommend a laptop if you need the portability.  You can get more machine for the money if you go with a desktop.  For others I recommend Asus, Dell, or HP.  Lenovo has been caught doing a lot of sketchy things lately Superfish and BIOS Backdoor.  HP may been questionable for consumer models in the near term as HP recently split into two companies.

 

I can't recommend spending the minimal amount that SEANIA recommends.  You get what you pay for.  When you're only spending $450 you're almost certainly talking AMD.

 

First order of business is to decide how much you want to spend.

 

Second, decide what you're going to be doing with the computer.  No need to spend the thousands of dollars on a machine like this if all you're doing is e-mail and web games.

 

Third, decide on what features you need or want.

 

I don't recommend less than 8GB of RAM.  RAM is the biggest bang for the buck upgrade that you can buy.  16GB of RAM is more than most people will need...currently or in the near future.

 

Get a Solid State Drive (SSD) that is at least 120GB in size, bigger if possible.  You can now purchase a 500GB SSD for under $175.

 

CPU and Video card will depend on what you are doing with the machine.



#10 SEANIA

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 08:52 PM

When you're only spending $450 you're almost certainly talking AMD.

 For everything, but budget gaming computer, that's wrong. Intel owns 77% of the current laptop/desktop market share. Take a look at all the new stock on Newegg in the 400$ to 500$ price range. 

There 142 different (pre-built) laptops/desktop running AMD CPUs. There are 407 running Intel CPUs. 

Ok, what about only better performing classes of CPUs I mentioned? A6, A8, A10, and FX from AMD, and i3 and i5 from Intel (lets exclude the laptop/desktop Pentium and celerons). That filters out to 75 models for AMD, and 196 for Intel. You can continue to filter down to specific brands, but it doesn't really change much. 

 

So I mean....market share puts Intel at 77%, and the amount of new Intel stuff in the price range is about 2.5 times that of AMD. How exactly is that "almost certainly AMD"?

 

 

Lenovo has been caught doing a lot of sketchy things lately Superfish and BIOS Backdoor.  HP may been questionable for consumer models in the near term as HP recently split into two companies.

Would like to add that both Dell and HP do the proprietary port thing for a chunk of their parts. More reasons to love ASUS everyday I guess XD only brand to have yet to do sketchy things or cut corners on quality or performance.


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#11 herbman

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 09:20 PM

 

When you're only spending $450 you're almost certainly talking AMD.

 For everything, but budget gaming computer, that's wrong. Intel owns 77% of the current laptop/desktop market share. Take a look at all the new stock on Newegg in the 400$ to 500$ price range. 

There 142 different (pre-built) laptops/desktop running AMD CPUs. There are 407 running Intel CPUs. 

Ok, what about only better performing classes of CPUs I mentioned? A6, A8, A10, and FX from AMD, and i3 and i5 from Intel (lets exclude the laptop/desktop Pentium and celerons). That filters out to 75 models for AMD, and 196 for Intel. You can continue to filter down to specific brands, but it doesn't really change much. 

 

So I mean....market share puts Intel at 77%, and the amount of new Intel stuff in the price range is about 2.5 times that of AMD. How exactly is that "almost certainly AMD"?

 

 

Lenovo has been caught doing a lot of sketchy things lately Superfish and BIOS Backdoor.  HP may been questionable for consumer models in the near term as HP recently split into two companies.

Would like to add that both Dell and HP do the proprietary port thing for a chunk of their parts. More reasons to love ASUS everyday I guess XD only brand to have yet to do sketchy things or cut corners on quality or performance.

 

 

 

 

 

Stay away from Asus laptops , they have a LONG history of AC power problems after around the two year mark of ownership and often times sooner.  It's how they connect the DC power jack to the motherboard , it's not an AC adapter issue.

 

Just "google" Asus AC power issues if you want more info , unfortunately repairs of the problem have not proved fruitful , same issue occurs every few months.

 

Desktops are probably fine though.  And no, Asus has done nothing about it , nearly everyone says it's a manufacturing defect.


Edited by herbman, 12 October 2015 - 09:24 PM.


#12 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 04:41 PM

What I do is a use a cheap $300 dollar laptop to connect to my powerful desktop at home (Core i5, 16GB ram, 120GB ssd) So I have mobility and power.


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