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New Router Setup Question


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#1 CigarGuy

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 03:20 PM

I need to replace my old router which is a hard wired older model and I use an Apple Airport Express as an access point for wireless.  The old router is up-linked to a 15 port switch that has about 10 devices connected, many of which have static IP's.  Devices include multiple NAS drives and networked printers with static IP's.  The computers connected do not use static IP's.

 

My question is after hooking up the new router, will all these devices be recognized without having to do backflips to get everything working again?  I've been putting off the new router for this very reason.

 

Thanks!



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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 06:37 PM

You will have to logon to the router via its default subnet usually 192.168.x.1

 

You would then change the routers subnet to the one you are using and configure the dhcp server to the range of address you want to use [range needs to exclude the static set you have].



#3 CaveDweller2

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 09:39 AM

As Wand3r3r points out, the router you have now, will have an IP address, 192.168.x.1 normally. For real ease of transition, you could buy a router that has the same number for X. Although, normally you can change this. You'd just hook it wired to a PC, surf in with the address provided, then you can change it. Making the new address you surf into the one you changed it to. Either way, making the routers address pool the same is the end result you want.

 

The only other thing you'll need to do is make sure the pool of addresses exclude the static ones. So you'll have to surf in anyway to change that so the address thing can be done first and then exclude the static addresses. It is the scope or range or pool, it has a few names. But there is normally 2 boxes, Starting address and Ending address. And just make the numbers so your statics aren't in between them.


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#4 CigarGuy

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:22 PM

Thanks for the advice.  Picked up new router today and setting up tomorrow.  Should be okay with the static IP's since they're set at high numbers such as 192.168.1.150, 192.168.1.151 and so on.  New router uses same base IP.  The dynamic IP's assigned should go no higher that 192.168.1.109 based on my number of connections.



#5 CaveDweller2

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 04:47 PM

Sounds great. Any questions, we'll be here =)


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College





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