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Tips on upgrading my desktop pc please(:


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#1 duncand96

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 10:13 AM

Hey guys im new here and just wanted to see if there are any useful tips for upgrading my pc specific to my hardware that i currently have. I bought this pc for about $500 from a guy who custom builds pc's himself about a year ago but i feel i could do with a bit more power. I also have an issue where my pc will randomly shut off when i send it to sleep mode(not shut down, but shut off, as if you pulled the power supply out while the pc is on, bringing it to show that there was an unexpected shut down of the pc error page when it is turned back on, and also a BSOD every now and then) I think some of this may be due to needing new thermal paste on my processor because it currently doesnt have any because i checked and its all dried out, i think it may over heat every now and then. On another note, here are my pc specs that i can find. 

 

Dell Inc. 0F896N (AM2) Motherboard

Windows 7 Professional 64-bit SP1

AMD Athlon II X4 640 processor

4.00GB Dual-Channel DDR2 @ 399MHz (5-5-5-18) Ram

1024MB ATI Radeon HD 4800 Series (MSI) graphics card

500 GB SanDisk SDSSDHII480G SSD

 

I know for a fact that i could use a tad bit more ram and perhaps a newer processor, however my current motherboard uses an AM3 socket for the processor and newer processors close to AM3 are running an AM3+ socket which cannot fit my motherboard. so my question is, would it be worth it stick with my current motherboard and find one of the better am3 socket processors available or go ahead and get an entirely new motherboard that supports a newer processor, and having to deal with making my other hardware compatible with the newer motherboard? My budget isnt that high, maybe $500 roughly. Im just looking to add a bit more power because my pc cannot run any of the newer games that are coming out these days. Its quit fast, with a boot up time less than 10 seconds and any program boots up almost instantly. So im looking for more of an upgrade that will help with gaming. 

 

 

 

 



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#2 BenjaminGordonT

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 10:41 AM

8GB of RAM would probably be wise... If your on a budget I wouldn't recoomend buying a new motherboard unless you knew ahead of time that all of your existing hardware would be compatible with it... I do know that there are a lot of new processors that are backwards am3 compatible... There are also plenty of good processors much higher than an AMD Athlon that are AM3 compatible... Plug that in with 8GB of RAM and some more thermal paste and your gold... But that's just my opinion... Feel free to do your own research...



#3 Gorbulan

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 10:55 AM

Well, if you are having problems with games it almost always due to the graphics card. Your Radeon 4800 is ancient technology! You could upgrade to 8 GB of ram, but it will not make that big of a difference. Most games don't even support 4 gigs of RAM. Newer games do, but not most, still.

 

If money is tight you can hold off on upgrading the processor and motherboard. Since you mentioned games as a priority I would upgrade your video card first since that will give you the most performance for the buck.



#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 06:01 AM

I would try upgrading your graphics card before changing out the processor.  Upgrading RAM is also an option, but in gaming, you will probably see greater gains with a newer GPU.  If you need to upgrade your motherboard for a newer processor, you will also need to purchase a new copy of Windows unless you use a full, boxed retail copy which is movable.


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#5 BenjaminGordonT

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 07:04 AM

I would try upgrading your graphics card before changing out the processor.  Upgrading RAM is also an option, but in gaming, you will probably see greater gains with a newer GPU.  If you need to upgrade your motherboard for a newer processor, you will also need to purchase a new copy of Windows unless you use a full, boxed retail copy which is movable.

If he moves his hard drive over it won't matter because Windows will still be activated on that version of Windows



#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 07:00 AM

Windows would need to be reinstalled if the motherboard is changed regardless of license due to low-level drivers.  For licensing, OEM/System Builder copies are tied to the motherboard and cannot be transferred to a new one.  If upgrading to Windows 10, the underlying license from the previous version of Windows (7, 8.1) will carry over to 10.  Here's a discussion on that.


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#7 BenjaminGordonT

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 08:21 AM

Windows would need to be reinstalled if the motherboard is changed regardless of license due to low-level drivers.  For licensing, OEM/System Builder copies are tied to the motherboard and cannot be transferred to a new one.  If upgrading to Windows 10, the underlying license from the previous version of Windows (7, 8.1) will carry over to 10.  Here's a discussion on that.

As long as the computer can't detect that he is using a new motherboard wouldn't it remain active like it normally would be?



#8 jonuk76

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:36 PM

That would entail using an identical motherboard.  It still may complain due to embedded hardware ID's not matching, and require re-authorisation, but you are allowed under an OEM license to do a like for like swap.


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#9 DJBPace07

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 05:24 AM

Windows authentication works with hardware ID's (I think).  If the hardware ID is changed sufficiently, reactivation will need to occur.  Under an OEM/System Builder license, a PC is defined by the motherboard, so, new motherboard, new PC.  Those licenses are tied to one PC and cannot be transferred with the exception of a faulty motherboard being replaced with an identical one.  Full, boxed retail copies of Windows may be moved from one PC to another, but will likely require reactivation.


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