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credit card was compromised, was it malware?


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#1 angelosf

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 12:56 PM

Hello,

 

My credit card was somehow used fraudulently, luckily I found out right away and blocked it. The thing is I have no idea how this happened. It could be some short of keylogger malware, is that correct?

I use on Windows 7 the latest version of F-Secure Internet Security as well as malwarebytes but nothing was detected.

I also tried to startup and do I scan with the F-Secure recovery boot disc. Again, nothing detected.

Well, I know the ultimate solution would be to format the computer and make a clean install but that would take a lot of time and I am not yet sure if the card was stolen from the computer or with another way.

Oh, and of course I should mention that this specific credit card was just used on very trusted websites like airlines and car rental companies, so no it can't have been stolen from a scam page.

 

So, what do you recommend me to do? Try something else maybe or would you format if you were me?

 

Thanks!



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#2 Riemann

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Posted 15 September 2015 - 12:58 PM

It could have been anything really. For example, a retailer being breached,  an ATM skimmer, a restaurant employee skimming the card when it's out of site, a breach at an online site, keylogging malware, etc. One way card issuers discover breaches is through a pattern of fraudulent charges reported by users, then looking for a common merchant between all of them. If you were quick to notice it and reported the issue proactively, it doesn't eliminate the possibility that you caught it before the card issuer noticed a pattern.

 

If I were you and didn't feel I had the technical ability to dig deeper, I'd stick to credit card-only transactions online and monitor your account regularly. If you see additional fraudulent charges on another card (or two) within a relatively short period of time, then you can probably deduce there is an issue with your machine. At that point, you can format if you're able to without significant loss of time or data. Your liability on fraudulent credit card charges should be little-to-none, which isn't the case with debit so as long as you have the discipline to monitor and report fraudulent charges you shouldn't really be out anything, save for a few phone calls to your card issuer.



#3 angelosf

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 06:47 AM

Well the procedure was a few calls to the issuer and a visit to the local police station for the report but nothing more than that. I know wait for news from them.

 

But that's interesting, I didn't know that the liability on charges with the debit card is higher than with the credit card, thanks for the tip. From now on I think I will stick to the credit card for online use, because so far I was using both.

I think I have started leaning towards the fact that it iwas something else and not an issue with the machine, but let's see.



#4 Riemann

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:23 AM

What I wrote above needs a bit of correcting/clarification:

 

First, card-type liabilities probably differ depending on where you live. Additionally, I think debit card (in the US) is different/less advantageous to the consumer depending on whether it's used as a debit card (e.g. pin is used). So, in terms of liability I think it's more of an issue in retail transactions (e.g. at a physical store, restaurant, etc).

 

ACH and wire transfers may also be less advantageous than credit cards in terms of what you can recover. In the US though, liability issues usually differ depending on what type of account it is, for example I believe consumers have less liability than business accounts.

 

If you're processing your bank issued debit card as a card-not-present credit transaction, liability-wise you may not be any worse off than with a credit card. The big drawback might actually be that you're missing liquid cash from your bank account while you get things sorted out.






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