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need 2nd opinion on "DiskInternal"


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#1 Achaemenid

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 07:24 AM

I have been told this program, DiskInternal, will allow files created in Linux to be opened in Windows 7

 

I am dual booting, so sometimes put a file on windows desktop while in linux, so I can open it later in Win. 

 

But on the website there is a warning that the file should not be used on the same disk or partiition.  

 

Linux and Windows are on different partitions but on the same hard disk. 

 

screenshot

 

https://www.sendspace.com/file/ey0awv

 

I am wondering if this program is safe to run. 

 

Any assistance appreciated. 


Edited by Achaemenid, 09 September 2015 - 07:25 AM.


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#2 packetanalyzer

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 08:29 AM

Achaemenid,

 

I assume you are referring to DiskInternal's Linux Reader (http://www.diskinternals.com/linux-reader/).

 

The purpose of Linux Reader is specifically for you to access Ext2/Ext3/Ext4, HFS, and ReiserFS format partitions in a read only mode from Windows.

 

If you are already moving or saving files from linux directly to Windows then you may not need Linux Reader.

 

Please see that Linux Reader is a Windows program not a linux program so it is for accessing the previously listed partition formats FROM Windows. It is not designed to access a Windows partition from linux.

 

What filetype are you saving in linux that you cannot open in Windows? Unless it is a linux binary, many user created files are able to be opened in Windows. If you are using dual boot instead of a VM, then you can save the file to a flash drive or a cloud storage service and then access the file when you start Windows.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

packetanalyzer



#3 Achaemenid

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 04:49 PM

Achaemenid,

 

I assume you are referring to DiskInternal's Linux Reader (http://www.diskinternals.com/linux-reader/).

 

The purpose of Linux Reader is specifically for you to access Ext2/Ext3/Ext4, HFS, and ReiserFS format partitions in a read only mode from Windows.

 

If you are already moving or saving files from linux directly to Windows then you may not need Linux Reader.

 

Please see that Linux Reader is a Windows program not a linux program so it is for accessing the previously listed partition formats FROM Windows. It is not designed to access a Windows partition from linux.

 

What filetype are you saving in linux that you cannot open in Windows? Unless it is a linux binary, many user created files are able to be opened in Windows. If you are using dual boot instead of a VM, then you can save the file to a flash drive or a cloud storage service and then access the file when you start Windows.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

packetanalyzer

Thanks for your response. 

 

I just tried to save a file when I was in Linux on dual boot to one of my windows partitions

 

When I got back to windows the file would not open, nor could I see what file type it was.  Notepad will not work.  I would like to save files across the two systems, as txt and print to file. 

 

I cannot save files to a usb when I am in windows because both my usb devices are password protected and cannot be accessed from Linux. Not sure I would trust saving docs on the cloud like sendspace.com. 

 

Assume "Ext2/Ext3/Ext4, HFS, and ReiserFS format partitions"  means the partitions made by  Win, they don't sound like LInux partition names. 

 

My question basically is whether I am safe in installing DiskInternal.  If is does not work, no problem as long as it does not do any damage. 



#4 packetanalyzer

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Posted 14 September 2015 - 03:21 PM

Assume "Ext2/Ext3/Ext4, HFS, and ReiserFS format partitions"  means the partitions made by  Win, they don't sound like LInux partition names.


No, Ext2/Ext3/Ext4 and ReiserFS are linux format file systems. HFS is a Mac format file system.






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