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Advice on New Gaming PC Builds


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#1 gatt74

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 03:16 PM

Hello.  I am new to the site.  I'm looking for advice on putting together a new, budget to middle of the road price, gaming PC.  I've found a few builds on-line that I was considering.  Could you help with advice on the quality of the components?  The combo packs I found are not complete builds.  Obviously there are some other components and accessories I would need to purchase and the prices reflect that.  Its been many years since I've built a PC so I am out of the loop as to what is better as far as AMD vs Intel, although most of the opinions I have read point to the i5.

 

Any advice you can give would be greatly appreciated.

 

i5 build for about $700:

Intel Quad Core i5-4460 3.2GHz CPU

Gigabyte LGA 1150 z97 Chipset PCI-E 3.0 DDR3 MOBO

8 GB (2x 4GB) Kingston Hyper X FURY RAM

Western Digital Cavia Blue SATA 6Gb/s 7200 RPM HD

Ge Force GTX960 Super SC 4 GB GDDR5 PCI-E 3.0 GFX

Sentey 725w Power Supply

New Best Vivo Gaming Case

(there was also a suggestion to add a 250GB SSHD for the OS which would push the price north of $700)

 

i5 Combo Pack for $589:

 

1x Intel Core i5-4590 Haswell Quad-Core 3.3GHz LGA 1150 84W BX80646I54590 Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4600 (Model:BX80646I54590)
  $199.99   1x MSI Z97 PC Mate LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard (Model:Z97 PC MATE)
  $84.99   1x Team Dark 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model TDKED38G1600HC901 (Model:TDKED38G1600HC901)
  $37.99   1x SAPPHIRE NITRO Radeon R7 370 100386NT4GOCL 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 ATX Dual-X OC Version (UEFI) Video Card (Model:100386NT4GOCL)
  $169.99   1x DIYPC Solo-T1-BK Black USB 3.0 ATX Mid Tower Gaming Computer Case with 2 x Blue Fans (1 x 120mm LED fan x front, 1x120mm fan x rear) Pre-installed (Model:Solo-T1-BK)
  $28.99   1x Stallion Series 600-Watt Modular ATX 12V SLI & CrossFire-Ready PSU from Rosewill (Model:RD600-M)
  $59.99   1x Mushkin Enhanced ECO2 MKNSSDEC120GB 2.5" 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) (Model:MKNSSDEC120GB)
  $49.99   1x Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive (Model:ST1000DM003)

 

 

 

 AMD Combo Pack for $269:  (For this one, I read some negative comments about the motherboard failing after a few weeks)

 

1x AMD FX-4350 Vishera Quad-Core 4.2GHz Socket AM3+ 125W FD4350FRHKBOX Desktop Processor (Model:FD4350FRHKBOX)
  $89.99   1x GIGABYTE GA-78LMT-USB3 (rev. 6.0) AM3+ AMD 760G + SB710 USB 3.0 HDMI Micro ATX AMD Motherboard (Model:GA-78LMT-USB3)
  $51.99   1x HyperX FURY 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 Desktop Memory Model HX318C10F/8 (Model:HX318C10F/8)
  $44.95   1x Silicon Power S60 3K P/E Cycle Toggle MLC 2.5" 120GB 7mm SATA III 6Gb/s Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) (Model:SP120GBSS3S60S25)
  $44.99   1x Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive (Model:ST1000DM003)
  $48.99   1x LOGISYS Computer CS308RD Red / Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case 480W Power Supply (Model:CS308RD)
  $44.99

 

 

   

 

 


Edited by gatt74, 08 September 2015 - 03:20 PM.


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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 05:40 AM

Remember to factor in the cost of the operating system, which is about $100, into all your builds.  Sometimes, combo deals don't include it.  If you have the money, I suggest a Skylake build with the i5 6600K, but those are newer and a bit more expensive.  Of those three builds, the first one seems best.

 

AMD processors will work in this build, but I wouldn't even consider anything less than an FX-8350 CPU for gaming.


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#3 gatt74

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 06:29 AM

Remember to factor in the cost of the operating system, which is about $100, into all your builds.  Sometimes, combo deals don't include it.  If you have the money, I suggest a Skylake build with the i5 6600K, but those are newer and a bit more expensive.  Of those three builds, the first one seems best.

 

AMD processors will work in this build, but I wouldn't even consider anything less than an FX-8350 CPU for gaming.

 

Thanks.  The first i5 build was my first choice.  But I will look into the Skylake build.  I was going to save the OS debate until after I figured out a suitable build.  Not sure I want to make the leap to Windows 10.  The AMD build was tempting from a price point and the specs looked good...but I was suspicious about why it was so inexpensive.

 

Is there an OS thats more suitable for a gaming build?  I was thinking to just stick with Windows 7 or 8 if possible.



#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 05:03 AM

Windows 10 is good, I've been using it since launch with Final Fantasy XIV and The Witcher 3 with no issues.  A large part of the debate about 10 is related to privacy, most of which you can turn off.  The under-the-hood improvements to the OS makes 10 worth it.

 

The reason for the AMD build being cheap is due to the CPU and lack of dedicated graphics card.  The FX processor is a unique design, so the 4000 series processors aren't true quad core components.  The motherboard on that build is also quite old and shouldn't be used for an FX processor as only the AMD 900 series chipsets are truly designed for them from the ground up.  Using an AMD processor for a gaming build is doable and can keep costs down.


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#5 gatt74

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 08:26 PM

Windows 10 is good, I've been using it since launch with Final Fantasy XIV and The Witcher 3 with no issues.  A large part of the debate about 10 is related to privacy, most of which you can turn off.  The under-the-hood improvements to the OS makes 10 worth it.

 

The reason for the AMD build being cheap is due to the CPU and lack of dedicated graphics card.  The FX processor is a unique design, so the 4000 series processors aren't true quad core components.  The motherboard on that build is also quite old and shouldn't be used for an FX processor as only the AMD 900 series chipsets are truly designed for them from the ground up.  Using an AMD processor for a gaming build is doable and can keep costs down.

The privacy issues are a concern.  I'm also not crazy about having to pay for each update.  Are you left with security gaps if you don't take the time to buy each  patch? 

 

I don't tend to play the most demanding games but I would like to have a solid build.  What do you think of the MOBO paired with the i5 in that first build?  From the people I have spoken with it seems the MOBOs seem to be the most problematic.  I've used an ASUS with my last build and I noticed something weird happened after a few months.  Something must have happened a driver or something because I lost the ASUS title screen during startup and ended up with a generic startup screen.  Also would get a error message abour a RAID.  Never really affected the performance.



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 09:33 PM

The privacy issues are a concern.  I'm also not crazy about having to pay for each update.  Are you left with security gaps if you don't take the time to buy each  patch? 

 

I don't tend to play the most demanding games but I would like to have a solid build.  What do you think of the MOBO paired with the i5 in that first build?  From the people I have spoken with it seems the MOBOs seem to be the most problematic.  I've used an ASUS with my last build and I noticed something weird happened after a few months.  Something must have happened a driver or something because I lost the ASUS title screen during startup and ended up with a generic startup screen.  Also would get a error message abour a RAID.  Never really affected the performance.

 

 

Buy each update?  Where did you hear that?  Updates are free.  Updates are actually non-optional, which is controversial, particularly drivers and updates which are not well described by Microsoft.  They will get installed automatically when you are online.


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#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 08:06 AM

Updates are free on Windows 10 for the lifetime of the device.  Here's a little more information on that.  Microsoft is terrible at messaging in the press, so a lot of the FUD has spiraled out of control.  You can delay updates, to a point.  Driver updates can be ignored, but it requires jumping though a few hoops to do it.  Here is some information about the Windows 10 update process and what is in them.

 

There is always a chance for dead on arrival or glitchy computer components.  I'm using an Asus board that has been rock solid for years, but the previous Asus board I had failed any time a certain amount of stress was applied with gaming.  Gigabyte is a good brand and the Z97 chipset is high-end.


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#8 gatt74

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Posted 12 September 2015 - 06:37 AM

 

The privacy issues are a concern.  I'm also not crazy about having to pay for each update.  Are you left with security gaps if you don't take the time to buy each  patch? 

 

I don't tend to play the most demanding games but I would like to have a solid build.  What do you think of the MOBO paired with the i5 in that first build?  From the people I have spoken with it seems the MOBOs seem to be the most problematic.  I've used an ASUS with my last build and I noticed something weird happened after a few months.  Something must have happened a driver or something because I lost the ASUS title screen during startup and ended up with a generic startup screen.  Also would get a error message abour a RAID.  Never really affected the performance.

 

 

Buy each update?  Where did you hear that?  Updates are free.  Updates are actually non-optional, which is controversial, particularly drivers and updates which are not well described by Microsoft.  They will get installed automatically when you are online.

 

I don't remember where I heard it.  I think I read it online shortly after I started seeing the Window 10 upgrade icon appearing in my system tray.  I remember reading that the catch to it being free was that you would have to pay for each update.  Then a conversation with a repair guy working on my laptop was where I heard about the privacy issues...  I'm glad I mentioned that here so I could get the facts.



#9 gatt74

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Posted 12 September 2015 - 06:46 AM

Updates are free on Windows 10 for the lifetime of the device.  Here's a little more information on that.  Microsoft is terrible at messaging in the press, so a lot of the FUD has spiraled out of control.  You can delay updates, to a point.  Driver updates can be ignored, but it requires jumping though a few hoops to do it.  Here is some information about the Windows 10 update process and what is in them.

 

There is always a chance for dead on arrival or glitchy computer components.  I'm using an Asus board that has been rock solid for years, but the previous Asus board I had failed any time a certain amount of stress was applied with gaming.  Gigabyte is a good brand and the Z97 chipset is high-end.

Good to know.  The ASUS motherboard I used in that first build still works today, 10 years later.  I just never figured out what happened that changed that title screen.   When I spoke to my local computer guy he was telling my he didn't care for building systems anymore because of all the problems he's had with motherboards failing and the restocking fees. 

 

I always had luck with Gigabyte products.  Glad to hear that's a high-end chipset.  I noticed less then great reviews on some of the motherboards in the other two builds I posted. 

 

Thanks for the info, I'm going to read up on Windows 10.






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