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Windows 10 is Great, Except for the Parts That Are Terrible


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#1 Condobloke

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 03:49 PM

This article is taken from How To Geek, and was written by Chris Hoffman

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/227827/windows-10-is-great-except-for-the-parts-that-are-terrible/

 

 

 

  It Uses Your Upload Bandwidth Without Even Telling You

 

While Windows 10 as a whole shows Microsoft listening to feedback, parts of it show the same old Microsoft that dug its feet in and announced products like the original Xbox One and Windows 8 without appearing to care about many users.

It Uses Your Upload Bandwidth Without Even Telling You
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How to Stop Windows 10 From Uploading Updates to Other PCs Over the Internet
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By default, Windows 10 automatically uploads Windows updates and apps from the Windows Store to other PCs over the Internet. This is a great feature when restricted to the local network, but Microsoft opts everyone into the Internet part of it by default, using your upload bandwidth for something that doesn’t help you.

Worse yet, there’s no indication this is happening unless you read about it online, find your Internet connection slow, or get contacted by your Internet service provider because you’re using up your limited upload bandwidth.

It could appear as an option in the custom setup process or a note about it could appear somewhere, but it doesn’t — it just works in the background. You have to find a special option hidden five clicks deep in the operating system to disable it.

This potentially helps everyone download updates faster — it’s basically like BitTorrent for Windows updates. But many people, especially outside the USA, have connections with upload data caps. Microsoft is saving some money on bandwidth bills by using customers’ Internet connections, without telling them.

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Few Options for Automatic Updates Hurt People on Limited Internet Connections
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How to Prevent Windows 10 From Automatically Downloading Updates
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Windows 10 forces all home PCs to automatically download and install updates. That’s good in one way, as it keeps home Windows systems secure.

But there’s a big problem with this: It’s not implemented in a respectful way. You can only configure the time Windows reboots — not when it downloads updates.

Many people — again, especially outside the USA, but also in more remote or rural areas in the US — have Internet connections with bandwidth caps. They can’t necessarily download hundreds of megabytes of updates every single week. Some people have unlimited bandwidth during certain hours only — perhaps during the middle of the night. Windows 10 provides no way to tell Windows to only download updates during these uncapped hours.

The one solution to this for home users is setting a connection as “metered.” Microsoft says you should set every connection with a data cap as a metered connection. This will give you control over when you download updates.

There’s just one big problem: Microsoft doesn’t let you set a wired Ethernet connection as a metered connection. If your home Internet service provider has data caps and you’re hooked up via a normal Ethernet connection, there’s no way to restrict those Windows Updates without shelling out $100 for the Professional edition of Windows 10.

This is reminiscent of the original Xbox One, which demanded a nearly always-on Internet connection. Microsoft just assumes all its users have broadband Internet connections without any data caps and doesn’t seem to understand the connections many people have to deal with.

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People Are Upset About Privacy, and Microsoft Isn’t Communicating Well
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Windows 10 is currently under a firestorm of controversy — even now being discussed in the mainstream media — over privacy concerns. Windows 10 is a big shift from Windows 7 and includes many more features that phone home to the mothership. Some of these can’t even be disabled. For example, the telemetry feature can only be disabled entirely on Enterprise versions of Windows.

Microsoft should be explaining this a lot better and making it simpler to understand. We categorized 30 different privacy settings located all across Windows 10’s interface and the web, some of which offered confusingly vague explanations. Had Microsoft arranged these options in a better way with more explanation, they at least could have dulled some of the criticism. We feel a lot of the criticism is overblown, but Microsoft isn’t helping itself by remaining silent.

Worse yet, Microsoft is charging onwards despite criticism. Updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 add the telemetry service from Windows 10, making Windows users sticking with older versions of Windows for privacy reasons upset.

“By applying this service, you can add benefits from the latest version of Windows to systems that have not yet upgraded,” says Microsoft’s patch note. That’s just a ridiculous explanation — Microsoft may be getting some benefit out of collecting telemetry data, but the average Windows 7 or 8 user isn’t getting a “benefit from the latest version of Windows” after the telemetry service is installed.

ximg_55e6133e23105.png.pagespeed.ic.czEa

Microsoft Won’t Give You Patch Notes; Deal With It

Microsoft is charging ahead with their vision of Windows as a service, planning to constantly update Windows 10 with new features going forward. Faced with all these constant updates, you — or businesses concerned about change — might want to see what these updates actually do.

But Microsoft has no plans to actually provide any patch notes so you can figure out what they’re changing. Microsoft might occasionally provide information about big changes if they feel like it, but that’s it. There are now reports that Microsoft may provide some patch notes to enterprises, but that would be it.

Microsoft is planning on updating Windows 10 on a continual basis with more than just security and bugfixes — with new features, changes, low-level modifications, and more. But Microsoft isn’t willing to actually inform their customers what’s changing.

ximg_55e61573f3198.png.pagespeed.ic.3Dj9

The Start Menu is Flashy and Missing Basic Functionality
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After years of using Windows 8 and then 8.1, any Start menu at all seems like a huge upgrade. But Windows 10’s Start menu actually isn’t all that great when you compare it to Windows 7’s. Microsoft added flashy live tiles and removed useful features. It may not work as well as it used to, but it does bombard you with information about hamburgers and Lady Gaga and football when you open it.

There’s no way to pin apps you regularly use to the left side of the Start menu, for example. Worse yet, the Start menu now works in an entirely different way. It only supports 500 entries and will break after you add more than 500 shortcuts, just not displaying shortcuts to applications you’ve installed. They won’t be accessible via the Start menu’s search feature, either. That’s just sloppy and shows Microsoft is more worried about making a flashy live tile Start menu than a tool that will actually be robust in the real world for the PC users who need it most.

ximg_55e6127f4a884.jpg.pagespeed.ic.8eFK

Metro Apps Are Still Practically Unusable

Thom Holwerda from OSNews writes that Windows 10 is only well reviewed because it’s free and because reviewers haven’t forced themselves to use only those Metro apps, now called universal apps.

You’ll still be mostly using desktop apps if you want a good experience on Windows 10. Even Microsoft themselves don’t seem confident about universal apps. Microsoft unceremoniously killed the universal version of Skype a month before Windows 10 was out — they want you to use the desktop Skype app instead. The Metro versions of Office 2016 are all called “Mobile” versions to encourage you to not use them and get the traditional desktop apps instead.

Even apps that are seeing a lot of development aren’t quite there yet. Microsoft Edge has a lot of issues, even when doing something as simple as dragging a tab out of a window.

Remember, Windows 8 came out in 2012. It’s been three years, and those Metro/universal apps still aren’t compelling. Really, Microsoft was working on the Metro platform for years before Windows 8 was released, so Microsoft’s best and brightest have had 5-6 years to release some awesome apps and show everyone how it’s done. Instead, we have the Skype team going back to the desktop app and the Office team telling people not to use the universal apps on PCs. Those universal apps are just meant for smartphones and small tablets — that’s what the Office team at Microsoft is telling us.

Maybe they’ll be more successful once developers can simply port their iPad apps to the Windows Store. Unfortunately for Microsoft, most PC users probably won’t want to use iPad apps on their desktop.

Windows 10 includes “Get Skype” and “Get Office” apps, which are literally just universal apps that just tell you to download the desktop apps. Microsoft is also using these ads to spam Windows 10 users with ads, so they do have another function.

650x426ximg_55e615c487bc7.jpg.pagespeed.

Mandatory Driver Updates Can Break Some Systems
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Mandatory driver updates are another issue — rather than just pushing MIcrosoft’s own Windows updates to everyone, Microsoft is forcing you to install the latest drivers it thinks will work on your computer. There’s no way to opt out of these drivers if they don’t work for your hardware. Install your own custom drivers and Windows Update will repeatedly install its own drivers over your own custom ones.

There’s still a “Do you want Windows to download driver software” setting buried in Windows that claims it will stop Windows Update from installing drivers, but it doesn’t actually work. Microsoft didn’t bother removing it, though, which just confuses everyone.

The only way to get around this is by blocking individual driver updates with a special tool you have to download from Microsoft’s website. But you’ll get new drivers when a newer version appears in Windows Update.

Mandatory security updates are one thing, but Microsoft should allow PC users to have control over their specific hardware drivers if they need it — even if this is just a hidden option you have to enable.

ximg_55e612a243407.png.pagespeed.ic.dgcW

These are just a few of the ways Windows 10 falls flat on its face. There are certainly others. The continued separation between the Settings and Control Panel apps is silly. The white titlebars are ugly to many people and a sad step back from the colorful Windows 8, although Microsoft seems to be realizing their mistake and adding color choice back in.

And people who depended on the unique placeholder files functionality in Microsoft OneDrive on Windows 8.1 will be disappointed to find it’s been completely removed in Windows 10.

Image Credit: TechStage on Flickr

 

 


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  

 

fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy


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#2 brainout

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 04:17 PM

There actually is a way to endlessly delay the updates, even when you're online.  You can set it to NOTIFY or 'check for updates' at a time when it's not online.  Such as, 3am when I'm sleeping.  For I disconnect the ethernet, and won't enable wi-fi.  So during the three weeks I used Windows 10, it never interrupted my work.  I could still manually check for updates, and thus control what it did, but of course could not control what updates I'd accept.


(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net


#3 rp88

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 11:57 AM

I read this article on how to geek and found it quite interesting, it certainly points at all the main areas of discussion upon which debates people are having are based, the article could certainly be very helpful to those who have heard about windows 10 existing, have heard that it has provoked many debates and want to know why this new OS has generated so much discussion.

I personally disagree with the point in the article which suggests that fully automatic updates with no option to turn them off or to select individual updates from the bunch are a good thing, the article says how the method used for these hasn't been too sucessful but I feel that the principle isn't too good either (because although having security updates is important, many other updates are also available, as they have been on all previous windows versions, and some of these other updates can sometimes be problmatic or make unwanted changes, on earlier windows versions users could pick the security updates from amid the others installing only those that the particular user wanted). Updates have always been set to have "full auto" as the default setting, so this change (as compared to older windows versions) doesn't help novice users to be more secure (because they wouldn't have changed away from the default), but it does stop more experienced users from having the levels of control they are used to.

As to the point about extra telemetry being added to windows 7/8/8.1, fortunately this is easu for users to reject if they do not want it, simply avoiding certain updates (by keeping their update setting on "check automatically but ask me before download" and checking the list each tuesday/wednesday so they can make sure to get security updates as fast as possible while being able to ensure unwanted updates aren't installed)(the list of updates they might not want is getting pretty long though) is all a user needs to do if they want to avoid this addition of "features". This extra telemetry being added is something which some people will not want, but fortunately it is easily preventable.

As to the point about patch notes, it does make me think: if a food product in your supermarket had a label which said "this product contains ingredients which fix reported issues and improve the product" but didn't say what those ingredients were, would you buy that food? I can certainly see why a lack of explanations will make people feel uncomfortable, I am a windows 8.1 user and I don't install updates for which there is not a reasonably clear explanation of what they do.

As to the point about tiles, I am very surprised in many ways that they even included tiles at all, given how popular the interface was for windows xp and windows 7 I still find it odd that microsoft tries all these new things, when they already had a design that worked so well. If microsoft wants to try and get itself into the tablet market (which seems to be where the ideas for tiles and such come from) I don't get why they didn't set up a new disivion to deal with developing tablety things while keeping their main business in the field they have always previously done well in, desktop/laptop systems following the principles seen in xp and windows 7, dependable workhorses for people to run programs on. They could have kept doing well with computers and opened up a new line of business in paralell, rather than trying to switch markets entirely.

brainout post #2: the problem here is you don't get security updates either, it's not total blocking of all updates which users will generally want, it's the ability to block individual updates (whatever those updates might be) and install other particular ones as they choose. So although your suggestion might allow you to have the ability to prevent unwanted updates, it also prevents you from having the ability to install security updates you do want.

P.S. I saw this thread appearing when I was on here last night, but then it suddenly dissappeared before I was able to post a reply on here(I had typed the reply, went to post and then got an error message saying that this topic couldn't be found, the things I wuld have said are basically the things I have said in the first few paragraphs of this post now). I logon today and see the thread has re-appeared, within this new "windows 10 discussion" forum (good idea to set up a discussion forum so that debates can be kept separate from those wanting technical help), did the (temporary) vanishing of this thread happen because it was being moved to this new discussion forum which at that time last night hadn't appeared yet?

Edited by rp88, 08 September 2015 - 11:58 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#4 brainout

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 02:47 PM

@rp88 #3, yes in Windows 10 it's all or nothing.  I'm more than willing to take that risk with Windows 10, as I can't afford to have any sensitive data on it.  So all Windows 10 affords me, is surfing.  Can't even use it for email, not knowing what might be phoned home. Actually, I just stopped using Windows 10.  If I can't use it all, I can't use it at all.  So whether Win10 were a good OS or not, the combo of mandatory updates which can change all of it at any time, and the horrific EULA -- makes Win10 a no-go.  For it violates HIPAA, a major law applicable to most of my clients, who are physicians, their advisors, etc.  So for me, I'm only waiting now for potential news that someone took MSFT to court over the EULA privacy issue, or for some state to strike it down or (preferable) for MSFT's legal team to wake up and repeal or strip out the law-breaking provisions in aka.ms/privacy and aka.ms/msa .  It will happen.  Just a question of time. Meanwhile, sadly I can't use Win10 at all.

 

BTW, Dell is now taking over Surface 3, article here.  There's a parallel article in ZDnet.


Edited by brainout, 08 September 2015 - 02:50 PM.

(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net


#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 02:52 PM

There is always the linux option but now that Microsoft is Hoovering up data like Apple and Google, I would easily recommend a Chromebook over a PC if one does not like linux and they only do basic things like check email and browse the web. 



#6 herbman

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 05:03 PM

There's a lot more things i don't like about Win 10  than i like , the tiles are a big negative , i  hate them and not being able to remove things easier without needing to use "powershell" is a joke.

 

The privacy or lack thereof is just on a whole different level ,  they really blew it.


Edited by herbman, 08 September 2015 - 05:04 PM.


#7 brainout

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 05:45 PM

JohnC_21, I thought Chromebooks can be rooted.  We had a PC World Forum discussion about that several years ago.  Schools are adopting it like wildfire.  Mind you, I still want my Windows.  I wish MSFT would wake up and smell the coffee and rectify 15 years of deafness.  But after so long, am no longer sanguine it will happen. 

There is always the linux option but now that Microsoft is Hoovering up data like Apple and Google, I would easily recommend a Chromebook over a PC if one does not like linux and they only do basic things like check email and browse the web. 


Edited by brainout, 08 September 2015 - 05:51 PM.

(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net


#8 herbman

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 09:59 AM

I agree " a "Chromebook" is what many should consider , the overwhelming majority of computer users i know just surf and check e mail , they have no interest in all the stuff Win 10 comes with , they don't even use half the stuff that comes with Win 7 .

 

Most i know want basic and simple,  period. 



#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 10:36 AM

I was looking at this new chromebook on Amazon called the Poin2 with an 8.5 hour battery life . Looks good for anybody considering one. 

 

 



#10 jj_mclure

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 12:57 PM

Just me 2 cents:

 

I got to love Win 8.1 .  it's fast and well built.

 

It's like Microsoft took Win 8.1 & put it in a meat grinder & just pattied it up & grilled Win 10

 

Too bad.

 

Hopefully a year from now MS will patch it up



#11 rp88

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 01:58 PM

John C_21, regarding your post #5:


I hear rumours that some chromebooks can actually be used to run linux, but only some, and they still have limited processing power and such so wouldn't run it as well as a more powerful machine could. I think that is the same as you mentioned in post #7, brainout.

For now, users who avoid certain updates should be alright on windows 7/8/8.1, avoiding these updates should mean data collection is close to zero. So users of windows 7/8/8.1 should be alright to stay with ms for a while, so long as they don't let certain updates install. When it comes to the further future those wishing to move away from ms would generally be better with linux than with a chromebook, because while linux (or windows 7/8/8.1) can do effectively all the things a chromebook can, a chromebook cannot do many of the things which linux (or windows 7/8/8.1) can.

Edited by rp88, 09 September 2015 - 01:59 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#12 Condobloke

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 06:34 PM

How accurate !!!....my sentiments exactly................... :hysterical:

 

 

 

 

It's like Microsoft took Win 8.1 & put it in a meat grinder & just pattied it up & grilled Win 10

 

Too bad.

 

Hopefully a year from now MS will patch it up

 

 

 

 

On a more serious note, THIS ARTICLE  discusses printing natively in Win X.....and a few of the comments at the bottom of the article give the real perspective....basically...a waste of time if you need anything other than the most trivial hodge podge that could be thrown together by any backyard app maker.

 

eg:

I found it incredibly buggy and it fails to print most of the time.

I removed the service via programs/features and will not be using it ever.

 

and

 

The test Excel file I did, which is 17 KB as an .xlxs file, resulted in a 10.4 MB file, compared to 140 KB when converting to PDF using Excel's Export function. I'll take a pass on the Windows 10 print to PDF file due to the huge resultant file size.

 

 

As one commenter noted...They had "print" to PDF as a feature since Office 2007. ......

 

and we are now in 2015

 

For those needing something that actually works........FOXIT READER     ...(Windows 10, 8, 7, and Vista)

 

As always...be wary of any added programs which are used these days to defray expenses....us then custom install, and read before you click !!

 

or....you can use Unchecky  to keep potentially unwanted programs out of your computer.


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  

 

fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy


#13 brainout

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 12:28 AM

Foxit is a cute program, but it cannot convert US Government forms.  Neither can Adobe Acrobat.  The only program I've found which can do that, is Smart PDF Creator Pro, and it only works if you don't do Windows updates.  I couldn't get it to work in Win8 or 10, if I recall.


(Away, Notifications Off) AUDIT PREMISES, my guidon.  -- brainout or brainouty on vimeo or Youtube, domain brainout.net


#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 08:52 AM

I use BullZip and it has pretty much converted everything I can throw at it. And it's free. For a reader I use PDFxchange Viewer which is also free.

 

http://www.bullzip.com/products/pdf/info.php



#15 rp88

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 11:21 AM

Another program which can make pdf files is google chrome, you can save a webpage as pdf within settings it has, you print but choose a pdf as the output rather than a physical printer. If you want to print something which isn't a webpage to pdf this isn't so helpful, but for websites it generally works very well. Chrome and firefox both contain buolt in pdf readers these days, firefox's might not support certain advanced interactive functions a pdf can contain, but both work well for reading the text in a pdf and viewing graphics within it.

Edited by rp88, 10 September 2015 - 11:22 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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