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Presumed graphics card failure followed by start up failures


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#1 John Mitchell

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 09:10 AM

Hi,

 

I have a desktop computer with a 128Gb SSD and a 1TB Sata drive.  I have a VTX X-edition Radeon HD 7850 graphics card.  I can't remember what the motherboard is and as I can't turn on the computer at the moment I am unsure how to find out.

 

The problem started yesterday, the computer was running normally (not doing too much with it, just some poker tables and a browser open).  Then the graphics card fan became very loud and the PC crashed.  I restarted and it ran fine for a couple of hours, then the same thing happened.  I have since been unable to start the computer with the graphics card in.

 

There are two blades missing from the graphics card fan, which I already knew about, but which hadn't seemed to be an issue until now.  But it does mean when the fan is at 100% it sounds pretty awful.  As I'm not a gamer this doesn't really happen though, other than for a couple of seconds at start up.

 

I removed the graphics card and connected a monitor to the motherboard.  The computer then loaded as far as the windows screen (running windows 7) and then the screen died, though the computer seemed to still be on.  I forced a restart and ran start up diagnostics, which said it was unable to start the computer but was unable to find the error.  Since then I have been unable to start up.

 

So that's quite long winded.  I have no idea what to do now.  Thanks for any help.

 

John


Edited by hamluis, 03 September 2015 - 10:27 AM.
Moved from Crashes/BSOD to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 John Mitchell

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 09:40 AM

Note:  When I say I can't start up at all now what I mean is that I get nothing on the screen but that the tower is seemingly running, at least the fans are on, whatever that means.  I removed the power cable and held the power button for a minute to drain capacitors. When I then tried again I did get something on the screen for a second or so before it went black again.  I've been unable to replicate even that minor success.



#3 John Mitchell

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:24 AM

I still had the two fan blades that had come off the graphics card fan.  So I superglued them back in place, reinserted the card and tried to start up again.  Immediately the fan goes into 100%, although now with all the blades in place it isn't making the awful oise anymore, it's just loud from running at max.  However, there is still no improvement, I get no signal on the monitors and the graphics card fan doesn't slow down from max.



#4 hamluis

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:25 AM

System manufacturer and model?

 

If not an OEM (HP, Lenovo, any other brand name system manufacturer), then tell us the motherboard manufacturer and model?

 

What specific diagnostics did you run?

 

Louis



#5 John Mitchell

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:38 AM

I can see that it is an ASUS motherboard, but I don't know the model, and I'm not sure how to find that out.  It was a friend's custom build that I bought second hand.

 

When I was able to partly start it up using the on board graphics I ran start up repair.  I wasn't paying as much attention as I should have been so I can't tell you exactly what it said, other than it said it was unable to start up successfully and shut down.  i have since been unable to start it up even to that point.



#6 John Mitchell

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 11:48 AM

Hi,

I decided that because I need my PC back asap I would take it to a local shop for a diagnosis.  I'm sure that is frowned upon in this community but in terms of cost/benefit it makes sense for me.  So thank you for reading and thank you to Louis for the reply but I'll now close this thread.

John



#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 09:57 PM

There are so many directions this could go.  First is to try the onboard video if the MOBO has that option.  If not, a substitute card is needed to T/S.  Once a display is achieved, video BIOS or CPU BIOS, boot to BIOS and reset to factory default.  If still no display, try a different P/S, with the sub video card in place.  A serious disassembly is required to check for standoff shorts, or busted connectors in the card slot, even burned traces between the power source and board connectors for video card.  Essentially, the failure of the video card stops everything, even the CPU from starting.



#8 hamluis

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Posted 05 September 2015 - 01:04 PM

:thumbup2: , contrary to what some may believe...we are not soliciting users with computer system problems :)...and the members here are all volunteers who have no vested interenst in doing anything but trying to help a fellow user with problems.

 

Taking the system to a local shop...is often the best move that a user can make...it's the right thing to do if it resolves your problem and you don't consider cost and wating time to be important factors...most members don't realize how difficult it is to troubleshoot problems when you don't have the actual system physically present.

 

Let us know what the shop determines to be the problem...and the steps they take to resolve it.  It may help someone with a similar situation.

 

Louis






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