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How to make Live CD/DVD?


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#1 gigawert

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 10:21 PM

I would like to create a CD/DVD not for installing Ubuntu, but use it from the disc and then have all the data gone once I take the disc out. I would like it to boot straight to the desktop as well. Google didn't yield any answers, so do you guys know how?


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 10:36 PM

 

I would like to create a CD/DVD not for installing Ubuntu, but use it from the disc and then have all the data gone once I take the disc out

Download the Ubuntu ISO, Get Ubuntu | Download | Ubuntu

Burn it to CD/DVD.

Then boot your PC from it.

 

How to burn ISO image using Windows Burn Disk Image.

 

Notice:  This applies only to Windows 7 and Windows 8, earlier versions do not have this.
 
1.  Place a blank CD or DVD in the tray of your optical drive and close the tray.
 
2.  After you have downloaded the ISO image you want to burn right click on the Start orb, then choose Windows Explorer.
 
3.  When Explorer opens click on Downloads in the left pane.  Scroll down till you find the ISO file you want and double click on it.  Click on Burn Disk Image.
 
4.  In the image below you will see Disk burner:, this should be set to the optical drive you want to use.  Click on Verify disc after burning if you want to Windows to verity the disc image after burn.  Click on burn.
 
burndiskimage1_zpsb502b181.png
 
5.  In the image below you can see that the green progress bar, when the image is finished burning the bar will be filled.
 
burndiskimage2_zps17a9d6ff.png
 
6.  After the image has completed being burned click on Close.


Edited by NickAu, 02 September 2015 - 10:38 PM.


#3 gigawert

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 09:53 AM

 

 

I would like to create a CD/DVD not for installing Ubuntu, but use it from the disc and then have all the data gone once I take the disc out

Download the Ubuntu ISO, Get Ubuntu | Download | Ubuntu

Burn it to CD/DVD.

Then boot your PC from it.

 

How to burn ISO image using Windows Burn Disk Image.

 

Notice:  This applies only to Windows 7 and Windows 8, earlier versions do not have this.
 
1.  Place a blank CD or DVD in the tray of your optical drive and close the tray.
 
2.  After you have downloaded the ISO image you want to burn right click on the Start orb, then choose Windows Explorer.
 
3.  When Explorer opens click on Downloads in the left pane.  Scroll down till you find the ISO file you want and double click on it.  Click on Burn Disk Image.
 
4.  In the image below you will see Disk burner:, this should be set to the optical drive you want to use.  Click on Verify disc after burning if you want to Windows to verity the disc image after burn.  Click on burn.
 
burndiskimage1_zpsb502b181.png
 
5.  In the image below you can see that the green progress bar, when the image is finished burning the bar will be filled.
 
burndiskimage2_zps17a9d6ff.png
 
6.  After the image has completed being burned click on Close.

 

Thanks for helping, but I don't want to see the Try Ubuntu/Install screen.  :huh:


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#4 DeimosChaos

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:04 AM

I see what you are saying. Ubuntu isn't built to do that as far as I know. You might want to use something else, like puppy, its made for live booting. There are a few distros out there that are made to live boot, but Ubuntu really isn't one of them.


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#5 Al1000

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:56 AM

I think Ubuntu should work live just as well as Mint does; the main difference in booting up is that with Ubuntu there is no way to get around the Try/Install screen, whereas Mint boots straight to the desktop as far as I recall.

 

 

You might want to use something else, like puppy, its made for live booting.

 

 

I agree.

 

Gigawert, Puppy loads entirely to RAM, so it's just as fast running from a CD as from anything else, whereas Ubuntu and Mint etc all run from the DVD so are considerably slower when used "live.". Once Puppy is booted up you can remove the CD from the drive so that you can use the drive for other purposes, whereas with Mint or Ubuntu etc you have to leave the DVD in the drive.

 

If you go for Puppy then make sure you don't "close" or "finalize" the CD when you burn the ISO, then you also have the option of saving your settings as a multi-session CD after you set Puppy up. Please click the link in my signature for further details.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 02:00 AM

 

 

Thanks for helping, but I don't want to see the Try Ubuntu/Install screen.   :huh:

 

Then you should download an alternative ISO, such as Linux Mint MATE, Cinnamon. Xfce or KDE (I don't recommend the last for this purpose, but included it for fairness), with the bit version that matches your hardware, on modern computers, 64 bit is faster. When the DVD loads into RAM & the Live session is fired up, just go to the Start Menu & use the OS as though normal. There is an Install link in the upper left resembles a DVD image, though nowhere near as what you describe. 

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

In fact, using the latest Linux Mint install media, is how I perform all of my online transactions, the SSD/HDD's doesn't see the Live OS, since all is running from RAM once loaded, and when I finish, a reboot flushes everything that I do, no trace of anything left behind on the computers. Many Linux experts, as well as at least one US government agency, recommends this practice for security. If any Malware did reside in the session, no way could it infect the drives. 

 

This is precisely why, though slower, it's best to use this method, rather than a bootable Flash drive, which can be written to. A finalized, non-RW DVD provides the most protection. The RW type of DVD's aren't recommended for this unique purpose, though it's OK to use these to test distros on w/out going through a dozen DVD's in finding the distro that's right for you, if that's your intent. 

 

Speaking of Puppy, if you have a 64 bit computer & you want a bootable CD that runs as though shot out of a cannon, then FatDog64 is the fastest Puppy that I've ever laid my hands on & have used it to diagnose hardware on computers that otherwise wouldn't run. Normally hard drive failure or OS corruption is the issue found, especially if all else is working fine. The only caveat is that it's a slow download, so if you have Firefox, and don't have a download manager, add the 100% free Down Them All extension to the browser & choose that option when downloading, it will be received 2 to 3x faster than Chrome, or worse yet, IE. BTW, if you don't already know, Firefox is the default browser for many Linux distros, though not for some Puppy ones. Seamonkey is offered instead, a lighter Firefox, and though Opera was once offered, since they stopped supporting 32 bit versions of their browser (unless they've changed their mind), am not sure of what 2nd browser is offered today, if any. 

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/fatdog/web/

 

Lots of information on this site to assist you & you have us as well. :)

 

Should you choose FatDog64, get ready for the ride! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 07 September 2015 - 02:03 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 pcpunk

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 06:03 PM

A finalized, non-RW DVD provides the most protection.

 

 

Cat

 

I am unclear about this guys, sorry for jacking gigawert's thread but it is on topic, I think LOL.

 

So, the DVD/CD does need to be finalized, or can it just be an R one?  I have been neglecting to Finalize them.


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#8 gigawert

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 06:38 PM

 

 

 

Thanks for helping, but I don't want to see the Try Ubuntu/Install screen.   :huh:

 

Then you should download an alternative ISO, such as Linux Mint MATE, Cinnamon. Xfce or KDE (I don't recommend the last for this purpose, but included it for fairness), with the bit version that matches your hardware, on modern computers, 64 bit is faster. When the DVD loads into RAM & the Live session is fired up, just go to the Start Menu & use the OS as though normal. There is an Install link in the upper left resembles a DVD image, though nowhere near as what you describe. 

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

In fact, using the latest Linux Mint install media, is how I perform all of my online transactions, the SSD/HDD's doesn't see the Live OS, since all is running from RAM once loaded, and when I finish, a reboot flushes everything that I do, no trace of anything left behind on the computers. Many Linux experts, as well as at least one US government agency, recommends this practice for security. If any Malware did reside in the session, no way could it infect the drives. 

 

This is precisely why, though slower, it's best to use this method, rather than a bootable Flash drive, which can be written to. A finalized, non-RW DVD provides the most protection. The RW type of DVD's aren't recommended for this unique purpose, though it's OK to use these to test distros on w/out going through a dozen DVD's in finding the distro that's right for you, if that's your intent. 

 

Speaking of Puppy, if you have a 64 bit computer & you want a bootable CD that runs as though shot out of a cannon, then FatDog64 is the fastest Puppy that I've ever laid my hands on & have used it to diagnose hardware on computers that otherwise wouldn't run. Normally hard drive failure or OS corruption is the issue found, especially if all else is working fine. The only caveat is that it's a slow download, so if you have Firefox, and don't have a download manager, add the 100% free Down Them All extension to the browser & choose that option when downloading, it will be received 2 to 3x faster than Chrome, or worse yet, IE. BTW, if you don't already know, Firefox is the default browser for many Linux distros, though not for some Puppy ones. Seamonkey is offered instead, a lighter Firefox, and though Opera was once offered, since they stopped supporting 32 bit versions of their browser (unless they've changed their mind), am not sure of what 2nd browser is offered today, if any. 

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/fatdog/web/

 

Lots of information on this site to assist you & you have us as well. :)

 

Should you choose FatDog64, get ready for the ride! :thumbup2:

 

Cat

 

Thanks cat! Will try that.


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#9 pcpunk

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 10:00 PM

Yeah, if ya want speed Puppy is the way, wow is it fast!  Takes some getting used to but it will rip.  And Fatdog700 is super fast if ya got a 64bit system.  I like Tahrpup 6.0 the best, it is really easy to install Firefox etc. right from package manager.  And is also very fast.  Warning, it is not as user friendly IMO - so if you don't mind learning something new have at it, it's fun!  The nice thing is, it can go to a USB real easy, that's how I have mine, and save all my stuff to it.


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 02:49 AM

 

A finalized, non-RW DVD provides the most protection.

 

 

Cat

 

I am unclear about this guys, sorry for jacking gigawert's thread but it is on topic, I think LOL.

 

So, the DVD/CD does need to be finalized, or can it just be an R one?  I have been neglecting to Finalize them.

 

 

When a CD or DVD ISO image is burned with most any ISO burning software, the media is finalized, it's part of the burning process, you just don't see it. 

 

It doesn't matter if it's +R or -R media used, most all computer's DVD burners will write to both types, that's the outcome. Cannot be written to again, no malware can write itself into the media. And is the answer to the OP's question, bootable Linux Mint media w/out the 'try or install' options popping up first. Works the same with Puppy ISO's, other than the creation of the type in Al1000's sig. 

 

RW media is different, though when burning, the media is still finalized. It's just not a recommended practice to use this type of media when one wants an ultra secure browsing environment, as the free space can still be written to. Maybe that's also a reason why RW type media cannot be used for Recovery Disk Creation, all OEM's will reject this type of media when attempting to create this set. Some may also argue that RW media isn't as good, though I purchased a 6 pack of the imation brand for $5 at Walmart, there was a box full on promo & took a chance on a set before Windows 7 was released (yes, over 6 years old). 

 

Those DVD's has been used countless times & still burns & reads good, had I known this, would have purchased at least 5 packs of these to have 30 total. Even with a few scratches over the years, these runs good, though since discovering how to install Linux (& Windows) with a bootable Flash drive, don't use these much anymore. 

 

However, as stated above, these are not to be used for bootable secure browsing sessions, though OK to create install media with. One can still test drive the OS, just don't perform any transactions when using RW media. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 September 2015 - 03:06 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 pcpunk

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 03:08 PM

I see, thanks for clearing that up for me cat.  I'm used to my DVD Recorder for my T.V., and that will ask or need to be Finalized if wanted as you probably know.

 

I also had good experience with DVD-+RW.  When I started all this that is all I used, never had an issue that I know of when for LiveLinuxDVD's.

In case you are interested, I have Recorded Video on these via. DVD T.V. Recorder - and got 13 Records out of each one very consistently.  Mostly Maxell and Sony.  I would guess the same or even better with LiveLinuxDVD's.

 

It's a bit confusing, as there is still space to be written too on each, even though it is Finalized it seems that this would be the same  with RW as with R.  I don't need the details, if I do I will look it up, thanks.  It's probably over my head anyway.


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