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Windows 10 create a backup system image


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 09:23 AM

Before I upgrade to Windows 10 on my Windows 7 desktop I'd like to know whether or not there is a built in create a backup system image?

Once my Windows 10 upgrade is running properly and before adding in any new programs I wish to create a backup system image

--- I know I can use a 3rd party program and I am use to Macrium Reflect on my Windows 7 but I wish to know whether or not there is a built in create a backup system image utility

 

So far I have found which I will do while my Windows upgrade is in pristine condition

 

Recovery Drive - Create in Windows 10

http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4200-recovery-drive-create-windows-10-a.html

 

Windows 10 ISO Download

http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/9230-windows-10-iso-download.html

 

--- Are there other items I should do in addition to these 2 as well as creating a system image backup?



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 09:32 AM

A recovery drive is similar to a System Rescue Disk in Windows 7. It is not a complete disk image. If you want a System Image then it should be located under File History unless Microsoft removed it in the final build. Personally I would use Macrium. 

 

http://www.winbeta.org/news/how-easily-create-full-backup-windows-10-using-system-image-backup

 

Edit: You would need the USB recovery Drive to restore the disk image.


Edited by JohnC_21, 30 August 2015 - 09:58 AM.


#3 cmptrgy

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 01:04 PM

Thanks JohnC_21. I do use Macrium Reflect on my main computer and this is the one I'll be upgrading to Windows 10.

But I still like to know the "default" utilities and I'll be doing that on another Windows 7 computer so I'll know how it works



#4 cmptrgy

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 04:35 PM

It looks like I should create the USB Recovery drive and download a Windows 10 ISO onto a flash drive or DVD

Do I have to wait until I can get on a Windows 10 computer or can I do that on my Windows 7 computer?



#5 jfruch1

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 06:47 PM

If you are saving your image to an external hard drive, make sure it's not an older one.  My brother had problems with an older one that caused his computer to crash.  I've never used one and he's much more computer literate than I am ( and I was a computer lab manager so that should give you an idea of the level of his expertise). He never had a problem with it and Windows 7, but it just doesn't like Windows 10.



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 08:17 PM

You don't need to wait to download the Windows 10 iso you can get it here. Or you can download the iso without using the tool here. Just make sure you pick your version from the dropdown box. You create the USB recovery drive after you install Windows 10.



#7 cmptrgy

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 10:46 PM

Thanks JohnC_21.



#8 x64

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 01:04 AM

Windows 10 includes the same system image backup as Windows 7 had.

 

From the Windows 10 start panel, search for "File History", at the bottom left of the "File History" control panel applet is is link to "System Image Backup". That takes you to "Backup and Restore (Windows 7)" (yes, it's actually called that - but it still works on Win 10 and is a deliberately included component of Win 10). On the left hand side is a link to "Create a system image" - that is what you want.

 

The system, image backup is exactly that - If you were to pick the resulting image apart (I'm not suggesting that you do), the files in the backup actually include a virtual hard disk copy of the disk backed up (a ".vhdx" file), exactly as it was at the time of backup.

 

You can (should) also create system repair disc from the backup utility. Alternatively if you just wanted a few files from the system image, you could take a copy of the vhdx file within the backup, and mount that as an extra drive (right click the vhdx and "mount"), then you can drill down and retrieve your files. I recommended taking a copy of the vhdx, as not to risk the integrity of the system image backup for a full restore from it. If you  are not worried about that , then you could mount the original directly.

 

x64



#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 08:12 AM

X64  makes valid points. In post #2 I linked to a page showing how to use Windows 10 own system image tool. But, if you compare Macrium and Aoemi with Windows own imaging tool you will see a big difference. When you create multiple images with Macrium or Aoemi there is no need to rename the image. Macrium can do differential images and Aoemi can do both incremental and differential images along with doing images using a scheduler. Aoemi can be used to do file backups on a regular basis where file backups on 10 is nonexistent. 

 

I ran into an issue using Windows system image backup on Windows 7 with UEFI and a GPT disk. It would only allow me to image the whole disk while Macrium will allow you do to a full disk image or only partitions you choose. It will also let you recover any partition you choose out of a disk image. For being free Macrium and Aoemi are very powerful image programs.



#10 cmptrgy

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 04:27 PM

@JohnC_21 The link you provided in post 2 includes Open up the Start Menu or Cortana and begin typing “File History.”

--- How does Cortana apply in obtaining File History?

 

@x64 in post 8 you recommended taking a copy of the vhdx

--- Does that mean to create a folder named vhdx for example and then copying the contents of the original vhdx and then pasting it into the new folder vhdx?



#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 04:45 PM

Microsoft baked Cortana into Windows 10 as the do-all search assistant.



#12 x64

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 01:10 AM

"@x64 in post 8 you recommended taking a copy of the vhdx"

That as an entirely optional procedure (& takes lot of backup/spare disk space, possibly temporarily). I was just suggesting a way of accessing individual files out of a system image backup.

 

If your need just to have a 'static' fall-back position, then the System image backup/recovery disk is all you need.

 

If you think that you might, at some time in the future, want to get at some files on the stored image, then the System image backup/recovery disk are still all you need. At that the later time (that you need to get at an old file) you might want to make a copy of the large vhdx and fiddle with that as opposed to mounting the vhdx file that is part of a viable system image backup. Copying the vhdx is ONLY a mitigation against corrupting the system image backup. This is as it becomes a read/write hard disk on the target system when mounted.

 

x64



#13 cmptrgy

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 07:00 AM

Thanks x64 & JohnC_21. In addition to creating system images on each one of my 3 computers I also use a batch file to save my data onto a flash drive and my external hard drive.



#14 cmptrgy

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 06:37 AM

I'm going to do the Windows 10 ISO today

My computer is a Windows 7 Pro 32-bit desktop and I don't expect any problems

Will I be able to do a 64-bit ISO on this 32-bit system or do I have to do so on a Windows 7 64-bit system?

 

Will I need to do Windows 8.1 separately on a Windows 8.1 computer?

 

The reason I'm asking is because I volunteer at our local senior center and I want to be helpful in upgrading to Windows 10 when I can and I want to see how each ISO is created on my own computer for the experience of doing so


Edited by cmptrgy, 03 September 2015 - 06:38 AM.


#15 x64

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 12:32 PM

I believe that you would need to do the upgrade as 32 bit Win7 to 32 bit Win 10.

 

Once you have done the upgrade (and your hardware fingerprint has been registered on the Microsoft Activation servers as part of the activation process), you could wipe your system and (assuming that your hardware is 64 bit capable), perform a clean installation of your system as 64 bit. Of course you would need to reinstall your other software and transfer all of your data into the clean installation. The hardware fingerprint taken during the upgrade should suffice to activate the 64 bit version of Win 10.

 

On the subject of system images, you could (and indeed I'f recommend) taking system images before the upgrade and at significant places throughout the upgrade and reinstall (ie Win 7 system before upgrade, Win10 32 bit after upgrade, Fresh Win10 64bit after reinstall. All it takes is some time and an external HDD.

 

x64






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