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Weird noise on line out, please help


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#1 forerunner

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 07:45 PM

Im running a dual pc streaming rig, with stereo out from the first rig split to both my headset, and the second machine into line in. Ive eliminated all possible sources i can with peripherals and the second machine. ive even gone as far as to unplug my hard drives. I suppose i could capture a recording of the sound if needed, or just make a highlight from one of my streams that is a quiet part that you can really hear it in. 

Ive tried using my Xonar DGX as my output to elminiate it.. tried using it in the second rig as a line in, just cant get rid of it. What can i do? is there some bios setting maybe? ive even tried different PCI and PCIe16 slots to see if it would help. and nothing. Ive even had this board (asus sabertooth z77) sent in to asus for RMA. It was sent back with no sort of note or anything. im pretty sure its discontinued by now, maybe asus will offer me some sort of upgrade to a board that doesnt have this problem?

Any solution would be of great help. Maybe external USB sound card? I have to have real time audio from the first machine to my headset with standard stereo jack. 

I should probably add, that mouse movements can be heard in this "noise". sounds like a super old printer "eeeeehh" noise. idk.. how to describe it.

heres an example
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcDv5bhy2g8



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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 08:01 PM

Somewhere in the splitter patch cord there is a broken ground.  This can cause all sorts of clicks, pops, hum and intermittent all three.  It is possible that there maybe a defective headphone jack/line in jack that is missing a clean connection.



#3 forerunner

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 11:47 PM

So you think its the splitter? I know ive used a different one in the past, other than this, but i also remember having this issue too before, but there was also a time where i seemed to alleviate it (mostly or to at least where the noise was unnoticeable.)



#4 forerunner

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 11:48 PM

So you think its the splitter? I know ive used a different one in the past, other than this, but i also remember having this issue too before, but there was also a time where i seemed to alleviate it (mostly or to at least where the noise was unnoticeable.)

Also, wouldnt a broken ground in the board been fixed when it was sent in to ASUS for RMA for this exact issue?



#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 09:51 AM

One would expect  that they did what needed to be done.  What was their repair response??  What did they say they fixed??   Then you have to assume it is something external to the system board or its connections.  Splitters can create some strange effects as you are halving the output, cutting the impedance in half and that may be a burden on the output amp stage on the PC.  Any audio cable, inside the PC and any external cables need to be kept away from any power source to other devices, especially AC adapters and cords as they will induce the 60 cycle hum.



#6 forerunner

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 04:46 AM

One would expect  that they did what needed to be done.  What was their repair response??  What did they say they fixed??   Then you have to assume it is something external to the system board or its connections.  Splitters can create some strange effects as you are halving the output, cutting the impedance in half and that may be a burden on the output amp stage on the PC.  Any audio cable, inside the PC and any external cables need to be kept away from any power source to other devices, especially AC adapters and cords as they will induce the 60 cycle hum.

So basically, i would need to run the wiring from one machine separate from the other, so as not to cross the audio cable with the power cables? on another forum, someone spoke about "single common ground" or something like that, it was a very vague response and basically was just telling me to research that. So far what im gathering is maybe trying a different splitter, (which this one is a 3 way splitter, and i notice no audible volume level difference with the split. something i noticed before in the past when i used a different 2 way splitter.) 

 

I know in the past i had this problem, and was able to make it go away, or at least, quiet enough that you couldnt really hear it, but lately its been pretty damn loud, as you can tell by the video. My rig was in a different place then, and set up a little differently. spaced out differently and might have been plugged into two different outlets without any power strips



#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 10:09 AM

That's one of the biggest causes of interference products, intermixed grounds that can put up to the full line potential (110 volts) between two units and then use a patch cord to interconnect. 



#8 Platypus

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 10:38 AM

It's video noise getting injected into an audio stage at some point. That's why it occurs in sync with screen activity. As mentioned, it can be due to the exact layout of earthing, shielding of cables or simply the design of mainboards and cards, which are mostly not designed with low noise in mind for audio. As you say, one thing you can try is using an external USB audio device.


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#9 forerunner

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 11:02 PM

It's video noise getting injected into an audio stage at some point. That's why it occurs in sync with screen activity. As mentioned, it can be due to the exact layout of earthing, shielding of cables or simply the design of mainboards and cards, which are mostly not designed with low noise in mind for audio. As you say, one thing you can try is using an external USB audio device.

So you think one of those would work to eliminate it? I thought it was somehow tied to the USB portion of the board. the sound starts when the computer first starts up before the splash screens ever finish and hangs around until the power supply fully shuts off.

 

Think that using separate power strips and eliminating the surge protector and different wall outlets would help me? I not exactly sure how i could try and wire things so they wouldnt come close to eachj other considering that i have both machines on the same desk and the orientation of wall outlets in this room and my currently setup.



#10 Platypus

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 11:28 PM

Video is always being updated while ever the system is operating - it's simply that changes modulate the sound so we can see and hear the co-incident actions, so we know that's the cause of that specific "sound". The general background hash is likely a combination of noise from various parts involved in the process - memory bus, power supply lines, data cables and audio tracks/chips on the mainboard itself.

 

Unfortunately each situation is unique, so a process of elimination is really the only way to work out just what is contributing to the noise and how much can be done to reduce or eliminate it from your particular combination of hardware. If the main source proves to be internal on one of the system mainboards for example, the only solution may be to not use that particular computer as part of the audio chain. Or maybe upgrade its mainboard to one of the ones designed with audio in mind (special board layout, circuit design and shielding). Or turning off the on-board audio section and using a good quality USB sound module could do the trick. I use an e-Mu 0404 USB interface for very high audio quality, and have only once had to track down some buzzing resulting from a tarnished contact surface on the earth of a TRS plug.

 

When it comes to external power connections, earthing and audio cables, again a careful process of elimination is really the only way to track it down. If it only happens for example when the connection is made between the two computers, and the outputs from both systems are clean and quiet when operated independently, you would suspect the pickup is occurring on unsuitable or poor quality interconnecting cables, or the earthing of the systems is poor and is interfering with the cable shielding. Tracking down causes of this sort of thing can be interesting...


Edited by Platypus, 04 September 2015 - 11:36 PM.

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#11 forerunner

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Posted 05 September 2015 - 12:32 AM

Video is always being updated while ever the system is operating - it's simply that changes modulate the sound so we can see and hear the co-incident actions, so we know that's the cause of that specific "sound". The general background hash is likely a combination of noise from various parts involved in the process - memory bus, power supply lines, data cables and audio tracks/chips on the mainboard itself.

 

Unfortunately each situation is unique, so a process of elimination is really the only way to work out just what is contributing to the noise and how much can be done to reduce or eliminate it from your particular combination of hardware. If the main source proves to be internal on one of the system mainboards for example, the only solution may be to not use that particular computer as part of the audio chain. Or maybe upgrade its mainboard to one of the ones designed with audio in mind (special board layout, circuit design and shielding). Or turning off the on-board audio section and using a good quality USB sound module could do the trick. I use an e-Mu 0404 USB interface for very high audio quality, and have only once had to track down some buzzing resulting from a tarnished contact surface on the earth of a TRS plug.

 

When it comes to external power connections, earthing and audio cables, again a careful process of elimination is really the only way to track it down. If it only happens for example when the connection is made between the two computers, and the outputs from both systems are clean and quiet when operated independently, you would suspect the pickup is occurring on unsuitable or poor quality interconnecting cables, or the earthing of the systems is poor and is interfering with the cable shielding. Tracking down causes of this sort of thing can be interesting...

 

 

Ill do some tests over the weekend, with wires and what not. Ill actually go to the store and buy a new power strip (the ones i have are like at least 15 years old probably) and see how things go and report back. thanks






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