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Ubuntu graphics driver problem


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 04:56 PM

Hello,

Recently I built a custom computer for my brother. Upon attempting install AMD catalyst center, the graphics card will no longer show up in my hardware moniter, and the gpu is not being used in games, which significantly decreases my frames. Under additional drivers the options for using x.org driver, and 2 amd drivers are grayed out, and the only option (Also permanently selected) is continue using a manually installed driver, I cannot revert the driver.


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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 10:22 PM

You could try running the propritary drivers from AMD. The AMD catalyst drivers can be a bit weird to get to work right. And they don't apparetnly work as well as Nvidia. Take a look here (http://askubuntu.com/questions/124292/what-is-the-correct-way-to-install-proprietary-ati-catalyst-video-drivers-fglrx) and here (http://support.amd.com/en-us/kb-articles/Pages/Catalyst-Linux-Installer-Notes.aspx) for intalling the drivers. The first lins is just to an ubuntu forum discussion about installing them, the second link is the AMD Linux install guide (which can be found in that ubuntu forum as well). Before installing the propritary make sure all drivers are uninstalled for the GPU before installing the new ones.

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#3 cat1092

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 03:34 AM

I'd suggest trying what DC has provided above & see how it goes. 

 

Honestly, have had more issues with setting up a NVIDIA card than AMD, if the OS were clean installed & the boxes for updates while connected to the Internet (recommended) are checked, chances are the drivers will install normally. Have never installed an AMD card after the OS was installed when one wasn't present during the initial install, so don't have the experience there, maybe because there were prior AMD drivers already installed is why I didn't have trouble. 

 

Which card is it? Many takes the same AMD drivers as the previous one, while some will need newer ones. It was likely the install of CCC that threw things out of whack, which may require the drivers that DC linked. 

 

While I much prefer NVIDIA cards, installing a newer card, such as any of the GTX series, requires several steps to complete, AMD cards has always worked out of the box for me. What you can do to help is disabling onboard graphics in the BIOS or UEFI firmware, especially if an Intel CPU is installed. That way, the only GPU seen is the one you installed (& likely the one you want anyway). Otherwise, why pay for a discrete GPU? 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 DeimosChaos

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 09:34 PM

I'd suggest trying what DC has provided above & see how it goes. 
 
Honestly, have had more issues with setting up a NVIDIA card than AMD, if the OS were clean installed & the boxes for updates while connected to the Internet (recommended) are checked, chances are the drivers will install normally. Have never installed an AMD card after the OS was installed when one wasn't present during the initial install, so don't have the experience there, maybe because there were prior AMD drivers already installed is why I didn't have trouble. 
 
Which card is it? Many takes the same AMD drivers as the previous one, while some will need newer ones. It was likely the install of CCC that threw things out of whack, which may require the drivers that DC linked. 
 
While I much prefer NVIDIA cards, installing a newer card, such as any of the GTX series, requires several steps to complete, AMD cards has always worked out of the box for me. What you can do to help is disabling onboard graphics in the BIOS or UEFI firmware, especially if an Intel CPU is installed. That way, the only GPU seen is the one you installed (& likely the one you want anyway). Otherwise, why pay for a discrete GPU? 
 
Cat


If you use my tutorial over in the How to section Cat its actually quite easy to intall the Nvidida drivers now! I got a GTX 980 and it installs right away without any issues.

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#5 cat1092

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 01:10 AM

Found & read it, DC! :thumbup2:

 

Will have to give that method a shot next clean install of Mint.  :)

 

BTW, those dual graphic notebooks are a pain in the rear, I installed bumblebee from the Package Manager, as Nick advised me some time ago. It's not a perfect solution & not everyone will benefit, yet it does assist many with an Optimus replacement. Would be great for notebook owners with dual cards to also be able to disable onboard graphics, just as desktop PC users can, for whatever reason, the OEM's just doesn't want to do it. Battery life may be one reason, yet that's a cop out, GPU's of today uses less energy than ever when performing daily tasks. Gaming is different & uses a considerable amount of power, though chances are, notebook users will want to be on AC power for the performance benefit alone & to place it on a powered cooler, which draws more power. 

 

The bottom line is that notebook users are penalized for their purchasing choice. 

 

And another reason why the PC will never be dead. Our choices are tied only to how much cash we want to spend. BTW, the GTX 980 is a great card, for my needs, the 960 was enough, yet if a hard core gamer like the OP obviously is, than a 980 or higher it would be, along with the needed PSU to keep things running good. Too much power won't harm anything, the system will only draw what it needs, too little is what damages components & one can only hope that the PSU goes w/out taking other components with it. 

 

Hopefully the OP can find some type of Linux OS to use as a gaming platform. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 07:17 AM

Thanks for the help,
After posting this I realized I had installed 32 bit ubuntu (oops) so I did a clean install of 64 bit which fixed the graphics driver.

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#7 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 01:29 PM

Found & read it, DC! :thumbup2:
 
Will have to give that method a shot next clean install of Mint.  :)
 
BTW, those dual graphic notebooks are a pain in the rear, I installed bumblebee from the Package Manager, as Nick advised me some time ago. It's not a perfect solution & not everyone will benefit, yet it does assist many with an Optimus replacement. Would be great for notebook owners with dual cards to also be able to disable onboard graphics, just as desktop PC users can, for whatever reason, the OEM's just doesn't want to do it. Battery life may be one reason, yet that's a cop out, GPU's of today uses less energy than ever when performing daily tasks. Gaming is different & uses a considerable amount of power, though chances are, notebook users will want to be on AC power for the performance benefit alone & to place it on a powered cooler, which draws more power. 
 
The bottom line is that notebook users are penalized for their purchasing choice. 
 
And another reason why the PC will never be dead. Our choices are tied only to how much cash we want to spend. BTW, the GTX 980 is a great card, for my needs, the 960 was enough, yet if a hard core gamer like the OP obviously is, than a 980 or higher it would be, along with the needed PSU to keep things running good. Too much power won't harm anything, the system will only draw what it needs, too little is what damages components & one can only hope that the PSU goes w/out taking other components with it. 
 
Hopefully the OP can find some type of Linux OS to use as a gaming platform. :)
 
Cat

  
Thanks Cat!
Ah yeah the bumbleebee drivers.... those were a pain to install. Thankfully the new Nvidia drivers support the optimus technology. Just follow the same guide that I made and it works for a regular destop card as well as the intel/Nvidia combo optimus stuff.

Thanks for the help,
After posting this I realized I had installed 32 bit ubuntu (oops) so I did a clean install of 64 bit which fixed the graphics driver.


Ah, fantastic, glad you got it working!

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#8 cat1092

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 05:02 AM

Thanks for the help,
After posting this I realized I had installed 32 bit ubuntu (oops) so I did a clean install of 64 bit which fixed the graphics driver.

 

Glad to hear that you sorted out the issue! :)

 

None of us are perfect, I've downloaded 32 bit OS's myself when meaning to grab 64 bit builds. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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