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Linux is now 24 years old!


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#1 MadmanRB

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 07:16 AM

http://linux.softpedia.com/blog/linux-turns-24-happy-birthday-489974.shtml

 

Funny because soon i will be in my 10th official year on linux :D


You know you want me baby!

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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 07:26 AM

http://linux.softpedia.com/blog/linux-turns-24-happy-birthday-489974.shtml

 

Funny because soon i will be in my 10th official year on linux :D

I will be as well soon!


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#3 jonuk76

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 07:48 AM

I first tried Linux a long time ago.  IIRC, it was called Mandrake Linux 6.0 if that gives anyone any clues ;)


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#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 07:54 AM

I actually first tried linux in 2003, didnt work too well i'm afraid as I had no idea how to partition back then


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#5 jonuk76

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 08:03 AM

I didn't stick with it at that time either :(  It WAS a learning experience, but ultimately I trashed the install so many times, and trying to get it to do anything useful like print, or connect to the internet (through a PCI modem card, this was before broadband common) was very difficult.  It was very different back then.  Example, on the "newbie" forum one of the first things they suggested a new user do was re-compile your own kernel.  How many people (even old hands) do that these days?


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#6 mremski

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 09:28 AM

"A long time ago" is remembering when you had to buy a specific revision of a specific Soundblaster card if you wanted a working CD ROM.

"A long time ago" is remembering the pain converting a system from a.out format to ELF.

"A long time ago" is remembering the joy of a consistent 56K dialup connection on the system you converted to ELF.

"A long time ago" is actually getting RedHat 3 in the mail.

 

Yes, I remember those times well.  I'm putting my start at about 20-22yrs ago.


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#7 TOMIS13LACK

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 08:32 AM

feel like i have been using linux for 25 years XD.


ooh, i have a signature


#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 02:57 AM

Happy Birthday Linux :bananas: :bounce:

 

If I put my start back at 2002 it sounds better.

 

I helped a fellow test-drive the building of a Members Section to his website known as Completely Free Software, run by Graham Pockett.

 

Graham returned the favour by providing me with 3 CDs containing Mandrake.

 

Graham's site only offers Windows material.

 

I still have the CDs but never used them (stupid) or I might have embraced Linux years earlier.

 

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#9 cat1092

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 03:43 AM

:birthday: to Linux! :thumbup2:

 

And to those who made it possible, be it Richard Stallman, who came up with the idea, but couldn't pull the trigger, Linux Torvalds who took the project & did, and the many unpaid volunteers who unselfishly dedicated their time to making Linux a reality to all, a very special Thanks. :)

 

Many may not realize this, it's the alternative OS's that plays a huge part in keeping both Windows & Mac in check, and another more known fact, Linux virtually powers the entire World. There is no Windows & Mac supercomputers in the top 20 list, yet over half are Linux ones. There's also Linux servers all over the world, helping to keep Internet services, as well as utilities such as water, gas, power & cable to many residents of many countries. Some areas of the world would have no Internet at all were it not 100% for Linux. 

 

That's where Linux comes in, everyone in the uncensored on the planet gets an OS, no questions asked! :)

 

Looking forward to a next great 24 years of Linux, I truly believe the best is yet to come! :thumbup2:

 

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Edited by cat1092, 27 August 2015 - 03:44 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 czarboom

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 09:39 PM

I didn't stick with it at that time either :(  It WAS a learning experience, but ultimately I trashed the install so many times, and trying to get it to do anything useful like print, or connect to the internet (through a PCI modem card, this was before broadband common) was very difficult.  It was very different back then.  Example, on the "newbie" forum one of the first things they suggested a new user do was re-compile your own kernel.  How many people (even old hands) do that these days?

No... not going to.  If I wanted to punish myself Id pay someone alot of money and have a safe word :crazy:  

It has came a lot way... as MS, they stole most of it, and then tried to sue to say it was theirs.... you can tell how old  you are by the reason you hate MS.  :deadhorse:


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#11 wizardfromoz

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 01:11 AM

:thumbup2: :thumbup2: :thumbup2:

 

I used MS for 24 years ... don't hate 'em - quite liked XP and Win 7 - I just think for the most part they are a waste of storage space.

 

Bloatware was coined to describe MS, and buggy is their middle name.

 

MS should be renamed MBS - Macro Buggy Soft

 

:wizardball: Wiz



#12 cat1092

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 03:05 AM

 

 

I used MS for 24 years ... don't hate 'em -

+1! :thumbup2:

 

That's the proper approach, that term is slung around on the dedicated Linux forums like mad towards Windows users, and makes us (the forum as a whole) appear as though we're not in harmony with one another. It's OK not to like or dislike another OS, yet the h*** term comes off kind of strong. 

 

We don't want to start fighting one another over which brand of OS we run & we don't want this Linux section to appear as a copycat of the many dedicated Linux forums, where this is freely allowed to go on unchecked & even encouraged by Staff members. 

 

From a security perspective & from Windows 8 forward, many don't like the stableness of the OS's (7 was the best ever) & this includes Windows 10, which is not as described by Microsoft. It's a hit or miss OS, have only one out of four of my computers that runs it decently, plus a VM residing in my Linux Mint install. Have reverted two of the computers back to Windows 7 with the backup that I created before upgrade, as I always do & at least monthly, and both are not running fine again. One more to go. 

 

Linux has came a long ways in the over 6 years that I've ran it, at one time there were no 64 bit printer drivers, actually until about 2011, not a lot of 64 bit support as a whole. Ubuntu was still recommending the 32 bit install for over a year after the release of Windows 7, even on 64 bit hardware & so did Mint. Only in the past 3-4 years did they stop pushing 32 bit & supporting 64 bit distros equally. Now there's talk, and when Linux folks talks, it's not like Microsoft, 32 bit OS releases should have ended with 7, yet they've released the version with their 'forever' release in 10. Back to Linux, yes there's talk about dropping 32 bit support, with a real chance that the next LTS release may well be the last 32 bit one. 

 

In reality, it's the right choice to make. Given that the OS will be supported until 2021, it's reasonable to say that most all 32 bit computers will have been recycled into new ones. What few left will be limping badly, with CPU's that can't support modern code, or if a 64 bit CPU on a 32 bit MB, that MB won't support new code. There comes a time when all things comes to an end, even Opera has discontinued 32 bit Linux browser development, due to lowered demand. It's the same with Linux OS's, more & more downloads are of the 64 bit builds, and it's not like 64 bit is new, has been around at least since the XP 64 bit/Windows Server 2003 days, even today's smartphones are mostly 64 bit. The last 32 bit computers built on a mass scale were netbooks, which were a fad that came & went fast, and maybe a part of the reason why Windows 64 bit builds are still available. 

 

Linux will likely be the first to place very tired & many neglected 32 bit computers out of their misery. Yet will do so humanely, even assuming the next LTS will be the last, that's still 5 years warning (6 if one's been reading articles). 

 

The other thing about Linux, and this is where the dedicated forums are wrong, Linux is about Freedom. Free to choose one's OS, the founders wants it that way & that's why Linux was born. They never were looking to saturate the market, just to give Windows/Mac consumers an escape route, another choice, at no additional cost except the learning curve & back then, the cost of a CD (maybe even a few floppies). Some has have stated that Linux was for geeks, if so, then I'm a proud one.  :)

 

I'm glad that Linux was handed to us freely & hope that it lives on & on for generations to come. The more choice, the better for all, including Windows/Mac users, though some may be too blind to realize why. If there were no Linux, Windows 10 wouldn't be on the house for a year. Microsoft has lots of reason that a fair amount of their users will defect, that's why they're pushing for totally locked down devices, if it were their way, Secure Boot on all new computers & shackled down to where it can't be disabled. 

 

Yet that doesn't stop one from running Linux via VMware Player of VirtualBox in Fullscreen mode & Pro has the Hyper-V feature that allows to run Linux through whatever the boot option is, which gives the VM the entire computer's specs to run on freely. 

 

Linux will live forever! :thumbup2:

 

EDIT: Fixed Typo. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 31 August 2015 - 04:35 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 wizardfromoz

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 04:07 AM

Mate, enjoyed the rant, and heartily agree. Was

 

 

...yes there's talk about dropping 64 bit support

 32? I think so

 

Windows reminds me a bit of Julie Andrews' wonderful Mary Poppins - "...just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down"

 

Except that no matter what the flavour of the medicine, nor the amount of sugar, it just doesn't taste as good as

 

FREEDOM!!!

 

... ala Linux. Let alone choices.

 

Linux rocks

 

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#14 cat1092

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 04:52 AM

 32? I think so

 
Wiz, typo has been fixed, thanks for alerting me. :thumbup2:
 

FREEDOM!!!

+1! :)
 
That's exactly what Linux gives us up to a certain extent, the freedom from endless EULA's, junk software, PUP's & a lot more. 
 
Though it doesn't imply that with Linux, the Internet is a wide open pasture to do as we please, Our ISP's still keeps logs of our activities, and these may be passed on to the authorities if going way out of bounds. It doesn't mean that we can use the OS to break the laws of our land. 
 
Rather it means that we're not shackled to the chains of Microsoft & Apple. We have an escape route should the endless issues with Windows, including all of the needed maintenance, becomes too much to bear or if we're fed up with being fed a bunch of bull crap, only to find things not as promised (as was the case with Windows 10 months back). At first it was one thing, support for 'the lifetime of the device', and got watered down every month or two & users still aren't 100% sure of how long this now very limited support will be. 

 

Move to Linux & forget it all. 

 

May Linux forever live! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 mremski

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 07:23 AM

Took you guys long enough to get here.

 

:devil:

 

Software has always been a balancing act.  Stallman felt "it should all be free", heck Unix in the beginning was freely given to universities, mostly for the cost of shipping a mag tape to NJ (Bell Labs, either Whippany, Murray Hill or Holmdel I think).  Then the US Gov broke up AT&T, and Unix became a potential commerical product and you have UCal Berkely vs AT&T and the original BSD sets of software.

 

At a basic level the question becomes "is software patentable?" (at least in my mind).  Businesses want to say yes (intellectual property) so they stay in business, John Doe with a computer at home wants to say No (so he doesn't have to pay $1000USD for Adobe PhotoShop).  People that write the software like to eat, sleep with a roof over their head get new hardware, so there has always been and will always be tension between these requirements.

 

How many open source projects start up, go halfway to the moon, then die, only to be picked up a year later?  People write and contribute to Open Source for purely selfish reasons:  they need something.  Linus was scratching an itch, others jumped in because they had a similar itch.

 

Me?  It all boils down to "what do I want to do?".  I have no problem paying a reasonable/fair amount for commercial software if it does what I want (reasonable and fair being defined by me, no one else), but it needs to work as advertised.  If I can find a solution in Open Source I do as my first choice, but how does one support the people writing it?  If there is distribution media (DVDs, CDs, etc) buy them instead of downloading ISOs.  If there are foundations that support people writing code, send a check.  You have a piece of hw that doesn't have a driver?  Put up a bounty and the hw to get it done.

 

All examples of "free as in beer":  If I buy you a free beer you get it for free, but I paid for it.  Please keep that in mind with open source.


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