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Best Hard drive to buy?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 WianM

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 11:59 AM

I own a lightweight steel construction business and I do alot of 3d modeling in framecad to speed up the whole design process. Recently I've just lost my 8th hard drive (6x2tb, 1-500gb and 1-250gb) because of that I have lost an incredible amount of time effort and work. All of these drives are Seagate drives and none of them made it past the young age of 1 year old. Unfortuneatly the computer shop that i bought these hdd's from closed down 2 months ago, so i continued to contact Seagate about these hdd's and they told me politely that i would have to pay for the shipping to them. Unfortunately I live in South Africa and shipping these to Europe is just not a viable option. Could you guys please suggest me a 2tb hard drive that will last me longer than just a year?

 

Regards: Wian

 

(here are 5 of the hard drives, i have already discarded 3 of them)

Attached File  IMG-20150819-WA0006.jpg   145.07KB   0 downloads



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 12:36 PM

If you do not have a backup plan, start one even if it means uploading to the cloud after encrypting the files and one of the backups should be offsite. If drives get too hot, that can lead to an early failure.

 

HGST makes about the most reliable drives now. They were originally Hitachi. Hitachi bought out IBM's hard drive business and became HGST until WD purchased them and created its own division. There are only about 3 manufacturers currently.

 

http://www.hgst.com/products/hard-drives

 

https://www.backblaze.com/blog/best-hard-drive/

 

534px-Diagram_of_Hard_Disk_Drive_Manufac



#3 YeahBleeping

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 01:53 PM

Not to take any limelight off spinner drives because I totally believe they are still viable and a good solution but you may consider a drive with no moving parts like 2 1TB SSD's  - Just a thought.



#4 hamluis

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 06:01 PM

I like John's diagram :)...very, very good and it reflects the history of hard drives pretty well.

 

But...if one wants "the best" hard drive today...it won't be a hard drive but a the replacement (eventually) for all hard drives...an SSD.

 

If storage capacity is what is desired today...just buy any hard drive made by The Big Three (Hitachi, WD, Seagate).  If reliability and stability are desired (and you can afford it), then investigate SSDs.

 

Louis



#5 WianM

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 05:58 AM

Thanks for the reply's guys, I need a lot of storage space unfortuneatly. if i bought 2 of the same 2tb hard drives from WD and set them up as a RAID 1 system, would that be a viable solution?



#6 canonsupport

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:03 PM

Yes, why not? You can configure as many hard drives you want to.



#7 hamluis

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:25 PM

Frankly...I've always thought of RAID in the present decade...as outdated.

 

Seems to me that the original premises of RAID setups...faster system interaction and backing up the system...have been well-overcome by advances in hard drive technology and backup/cloning software...with less risk of data loss on either count.  IMO, the reason that RAID controllers became standard equipment on motherboards...is the fact that the largest purchasers of new motherboards (and systems employing such) would be new users...who might think that RAID capabilities...is something that it is not in 2015 or whatever year.

 

I don't do IT on a professional level, so my opinions are those of a novice user...but my understanding is that RAID was/is primarily used beneficially on setups (network servers) where the advantages that I see in today's hard drives/SSDs may not necessarily be prevalent.

 

I would never suggest a RAID setup for anyone other than an enthusiast...with the definition of "enthusiast" being someone who just wants to play with toys for the sake of playing with toys, understanding that there may be logical benefit to such :).

 

Louis



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:37 PM

I agree with hamluis. Forget RAID and keep it simple. Personally, I would use one 2TB for your system and data and the other for use in backing up your data with something like Macrium Free or Aoemi Backupper. I know Aoemi will let you do scheduled backups. A new drive can fail. That is why backups are so important.



#9 Scoop8

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 07:23 AM

I've had fairly good experiences with my Seagate HDD's.  I've had only one Seagate HDD problem occur in about 5 years with several spares which I use for alternating Cloning and testing Image restorations.

 

From my reading of this topic here and elsewhere, it's similar to discussing AV products.  Everyone's mileage varies significantly with brand-name HDD experiences.

 

 

Ditto on the RAID comment inputs here.  I had RAID 1 installed on my Desktop PC when I had it built a few years ago.  The idea sounded great at the time, mirrored 2nd HDD, real-time redundancy.

 

When I learned more about Cloning and Imaging, and the vulnerability that exists with a RAID 1 array (mirroring everything to the 2nd HDD including malicious intrusions, user errors, bad downloads, PUP's, etc),  I switched to periodic Cloning and Imaging for my full-HDD backup plan.



#10 ship_kicker

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 02:36 PM

I've used various brands of hard disks over the years. some of my very old (1989-92) are still working great. But obviously times have changed. In my main desktop I use a Western Digital 1 TB, but they do make larger models. I've had a Seagate crap out in me yet though. Some say theyre cheap though..

#11 synergy513

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 06:46 PM

Seagate has let me down once, standard SMART error can't boot nasty from BIOS. And as i analyze speccy readouts from various users/members, i see way to many errors with seagate drives..... my most fascinating hard drive has to be a maxtor 250gb from 2005. it consistently runs in the mid 50s celsius temperature range (which most consider abhorrent for an HDD), but is still chugging along as my XP boot drive. ,,that XP PC has to DIE sometime, but insists on living on like a vampire. mostly due to the maxtor hdd and the intel motherboard staying youthful..somehow.. I know I used the bleep out of it during those 10 years. now , i am using western digital and hitachi drives with smooth and smug feelings. the way i configure is to have one hdd as a boot/OS drive and leave it alone and defragged ....and use something else for storage and programs. that works out well. i would like to believe that all hard drives regardless of brand, roll off the same assembly line in china somewhere, but years of usage has led me to believe otherwise, in disbelief for seagate.

Moore's Law : 4d Graph in Progress


#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 11:51 AM

Update to the Backblaze HDD reliability review.

 

https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-reliability-q4-2015/



#13 Niweg

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 12:36 PM

 I believe the Backblaze reports too.  Their data is based on experience with over 40,000 hard drives, and Seagate comes in with the worst reliability stats, HGST comes in with the best.  They're now a subsidary of WD, as has been pointed out, but so far they have the best reliability statistics in the Backblaze reports.  I have seen a whole lot of references to their reports with no reason not to believe them.

 

 Regarding backup, I've been useing Easeus Todo Backup for several years without any problems.  There's a free version for home use and a commercial version as well.  Whatever you use, set it up to do regularly scheduled backups to an external hard drive.  If you don't want to lose your data and possibly your system, that is by all means what you need to do.

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#14 Ram4x4

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 11:45 AM

I'll second the sentiments on Seagate drives.  I've had many, many drives and brands over the years.  The Seagates were the worst by far, so much so I will never buy another.  I still have my very first HDD, a 52MB Quantum SCSI drive installed in my old Amiga 2000.  It began life holding a BBS system, but was later replaced with a Fujitsu 1GB (full height at that!), and then Commodore went down the tubes and the WWW became ubiquitous, so I was finally forced to get a "PC" (I sure miss the old Amiga and the BBS days).  The 52MB drive still works to this day....

 

I am a definite fan right now of Samsung SSD's and WD mechanicals.  SSD's are still a little on the pricey side for large capacities IMHO, so I pair an SSD with a large capacity mechanical for onboard storage.  Being a hobbyist photographer, I do all my downloading of photos to the onboard 1TB WD drive in my PC, do all my post processing, then save a copy of the raw and processed photos to my 4TB NAS.  A final backup is then done to 100GB M-Discs for long term storage.

 

Since the OP is using his for work related activities, I highly suggest some sort of data backup plan.  Perhaps a large capacity NAS, or at the very least something to provide storage of the files on something other than just the PC.  If framecad is typical as most CAD programs are, the files are probably quite large.   He'll need some capacity for sure.  He'll also need a third, final backup solution to ensure he never loses any of his files.



#15 Drillingmachine

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 12:12 PM

 I believe the Backblaze reports too.  Their data is based on experience with over 40,000 hard drives, and Seagate comes in with the worst reliability stats, HGST comes in with the best.  They're now a subsidary of WD, as has been pointed out, but so far they have the best reliability statistics in the Backblaze reports.  I have seen a whole lot of references to their reports with no reason not to believe them.

 

Reason not to believe http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/6028/dispelling-backblaze-s-hdd-reliability-myth-the-real-story-covered/index.html

 

Backblaze has drives in different conditions that greatly affect on failure rates. That's why Backblazes "reserach" is useless.






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