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Installing Linux Mint via Unetbootin through the Hard Drive


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#1 Chesterlots

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 04:18 PM

I am currently using a 32bit copy of Linux Cinnamon, though I would like to switch to Xfce since it performs better on low end hardware, like my laptop here. Unfortuanatly, I can not use the disk I originally used as it was a R disk, so there is no formatting it and loading up Xfce on it. That was my only disk, and no USB drives are present.

 

Unetbootin appearantly allows for this process through the hard drive, I got the ISO, and followed the steps here http://unetbootin.github.io/. The difference being I used the Linux bootloader via holding onto shift and then selected unetbootin... the problem is that it just booted up to my normal OS copy of Cinnamon, and not the ISO of Xfce.

 

I have spent about two hours looking up the problem, to no avail, so I thought coming here would be the smart thing to do.

 

Appreciate the help.


Edited by Chesterlots, 17 August 2015 - 04:21 PM.


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#2 mremski

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 04:58 PM

Going by the documentation (I haven't used unetbootin) it looks like unetbootin is a tool to create a bootable USB drive (thumb drive or USB hard drive).  Is your machine dual booting windows and linux currently (I'm asking because of your statement about using the Linux bootloader)?  It looks like unetbootin adds something to the Windows boot menu.  If you used the Linux bootloader, it may be pointing to the old/existing root device, you would need to edit the bootline to point at the new device.


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#3 NickAu

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 04:59 PM

UNetbootin allows you to create bootable Live USB drives.  You need to install Linux to HDD or USB first. All you have is a Live USB and everytime you reboot everything you did is gone.


Edited by NickAu, 17 August 2015 - 05:00 PM.


#4 Chesterlots

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 05:32 PM

Going by the documentation (I haven't used unetbootin) it looks like unetbootin is a tool to create a bootable USB drive (thumb drive or USB hard drive).  Is your machine dual booting windows and linux currently (I'm asking because of your statement about using the Linux bootloader)?  It looks like unetbootin adds something to the Windows boot menu.  If you used the Linux bootloader, it may be pointing to the old/existing root device, you would need to edit the bootline to point at the new device.

Just Linux. I mentioned the Linux bootloader because the tutorial goes over using the Windows bootloader without giving any steps for those using Linux, the equivalent of course being the aforementioned Linux bootloader.

 

Unetbootin is indeed a tool typically used for creating bootable USB drives, though it allows for the installation of an ISO through the hard disk via the steps provided in the link.



#5 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 01:31 AM

selected unetbootin... the problem is that it just booted up to my normal OS copy of Cinnamon, and not the ISO of Xfce


Weird that it boots Cinnamon instead of giving an error. Since them menu entry is there I'd suggest you have a look at it. What is the output of:
cat /boot/grub/grub.cfg
(You don't need to share the whole output, just the menuentry part for UNetbootin.)

Here is what my Unetbootin menu-entry looks like (though I'm using Linux Mint Cinnamon ISO not the LInux Mint XFCE ISO).

menuentry "UNetbootin" {
    set root=(hd0,2)
    linux  /boot/ubnkern file=/cdrom/preseed/linuxmint.seed boot=casper quiet splash --
    initrd /boot/ubninit
}

Alternatively you could try creating your own Grub menu entry that boots the ISO instead of using Unetbootin. The process is discussed a bit in this link: SHA-512:b2d96043033cd79ea7b2ae0b55ce70c84903b5c3dcaaa5939ed64a10de904bf7a6f954ac6301df27e9e064bc7454ef00fdbcb0350b56d6dbb34aa8aa1d0cd911
 



#6 Chesterlots

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 01:17 PM

I ended up finding the steps on the process here: http://sourceforge.net/p/unetbootin/wiki/installmodes/

 

From my understanding, if I tried to do the proccess while being in the same partition, it would probably trip over its own process and erase itself while performing the installation, which of course would not be pretty. So I needed to get a mini-Distro to load onto my ram to mess around with the partition.

 

However, with PartedMagic now being commercialised, I had to then find an alternative, being gparted. But then I was opened up to a new realm of issues with trying to mess with the partition, being that I couldn't figure out how to take the mini-Distro (gparted) entirely into my ram so I could unlock the partition, it seems it would just ignore my request to boot to RAM and just boot up normally on the hard disk.

 

At this point, I was willing to rather scavange every inch of the house for a magically spared DVD to use. I am a mere day away from school starting again, which means I don't have much time left to finish tinkering with this process, it would be better to try to do this the easier, safer way, even if it means shelling out some money to buy one, which would take a few days into the school year. And against all odds, there was a dusty old case I found which so happened to contain an unused disc.

 

Thanks for the help, anyways. I may try to explore this again when I have more time in the future just for experimentation's sake.

 

 

And yes, XFCE is running much smoother than Cinnamon, and Firefox does not seem to want to crash every hour due to the measly amount of 512 MB of ram (19% usage when no program is running other than task manager). As a bonus, I do like the start menu layout more than the other, despite it having less eye candy.






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