Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Why aren't open source codecs & media containers mainstream


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 SuperSapien64

SuperSapien64

  • Members
  • 888 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:41 PM

Posted 17 August 2015 - 11:55 AM

It seem like open source codecs & media containers are less common. And why aren't they more popular? Like for example why doesn't Amazon music have option for .ogg with FLAC encoding? I understand other formats and codecs have been around longer but there are advantages to using open source and shouldn't that make them a bit more common?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 gigawert

gigawert

  • Members
  • 1,304 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:07:41 PM

Posted 17 August 2015 - 11:56 AM

VLC media player is a multi-platform media player which is extremely popular that can play any type of media file you can think of.


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#3 mremski

mremski

  • Members
  • 493 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NH
  • Local time:10:41 PM

Posted 17 August 2015 - 12:22 PM

most codecs are licensed as intellectual property, some have been around long enough that there are legal open source implementations, but they may not support everything.

"Why doesn't Amazon....", perhaps there isn't enough demand for other formats?  Think about the installed PC/device that can play audio base:  what's the breakdown between Windows PCs, Macs/iPhones/iPad/iXYZ and Android devices?  If their customer base suddenly got a substantial increase in requests for format ABC, they'd likely do something about it.  The other part of the equation is that Linux/*BSDs have tools that can play existing formats.


FreeBSD since 3.3, only time I touch Windows is to fix my wife's computer


#4 SuperSapien64

SuperSapien64
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 888 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:41 PM

Posted 17 August 2015 - 09:49 PM

VLC media player is a multi-platform media player which is extremely popular that can play any type of media file you can think of.

Good choice I use VLC on Android to play all my media files and another great desktop media player is Kodi and for music Clementine.

 

most codecs are licensed as intellectual property, some have been around long enough that there are legal open source implementations, but they may not support everything.

"Why doesn't Amazon....", perhaps there isn't enough demand for other formats?  Think about the installed PC/device that can play audio base:  what's the breakdown between Windows PCs, Macs/iPhones/iPad/iXYZ and Android devices?  If their customer base suddenly got a substantial increase in requests for format ABC, they'd likely do something about it.  The other part of the equation is that Linux/*BSDs have tools that can play existing formats.

You mean like the Lame mp3 encoder? Well I know Android can play open media formats and codecs and Windows Media Player & Quicktime unofficially support them. But there are older devices and software which can't be updated, but for newer devices and software there is little reason for them not to support this. After all they don't have to pay any license fees to use them not to mention open source is becoming more popular because of this and as far as I can tell there comparable if not on par with closed sourced media codecs and containers.

Speaking of which how well do open codecs & media containers stack against the closed sourced ones?



#5 mremski

mremski

  • Members
  • 493 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NH
  • Local time:10:41 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 01:48 AM

"How well do they stack up?"  All depends on the requirements of what you are trying to do.  Are you looking for adequate voice over limited bandwidth transports (think 2 way radios) or are you looking for highest fidelity lossless music reproduction?  Opposite ends of the spectrum.  If you want a broad statement, then yes you can probably find an opensource codec that perform about as good as a closed source one.   Lots of the closed source ones put out reference implementation that can be or is the basis of open source ones, but those may have very restrictive licenses.

 

Android:  based on Linux, no?  So you could argue it's more likely to support open source tools.  WMP and QT?  Speculation, but supporting other formats gives customers a reason to stay on Windows and OsX

 

All I was trying to point out that Amazon (and other providers) is driven by customer demands.  A large enough group of customers demanding "release in format XYZ" will get attention, while one or two people asking questions elsewhere won't get Amazons attention.

 

My opinions only;  I don't have an Amazon account so they sure as heck won't listen to me.


FreeBSD since 3.3, only time I touch Windows is to fix my wife's computer





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users