Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

computer overheating


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 discoduck

discoduck

  • Members
  • 45 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 14 August 2015 - 05:47 PM

I have a hp pavilion g6-2123 us notebook pc, operating system windows 7 64 bit

 

I had my internal fan make a rattling sound then stop so I had my fan replaced. my computer had been getting hot already before I replaced the fan but now it still gets hot clocking some high numbers  the cpu has hit 139 Celsius before with the motherboard hitting 87 Celsius at the same time.

 

my computer freezes sometimes and it has cut off once recently. I did a virus scans and found nothing with multiple antivirus utilities. the place I had replace the fan said it could be something wrong with the bios and mentioned flashing the bios. I wanted to eliminate everything else before messing up the BIOS and not having it be able to boot up anymore. I think maybe the heatsink wasn't done right the first time

 

 

I'm attaching a pic of the speccy utility I used to check the heat one day

Attached Files



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 OldPhil

OldPhil

    Doppleganger


  • Members
  • 4,123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island New York
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 14 August 2015 - 05:53 PM

Wonder if the processor paste dried or the tech did not clean while it was open.


Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#3 LFos42

LFos42

  • Members
  • 46 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 15 August 2015 - 03:15 PM

Ouch.  I'm surprised the processor works at all, lol. I agree it sounds like the tech never replaced the thermal paste, just the fan.  You'll need to repaste the processor and that should solve your problem.  Motherboards will automatically shutdown on a cpu fan failure to protect the processor from immediately frying itself.  thermal paste breaks down over time so that would be a good step. (and blowing out the fans/case.)



#4 discoduck

discoduck
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 45 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 17 August 2015 - 04:54 PM

he said he did replace the thermal paste but he's not sure if he added enough.  what about the bios being corrupt could that cause overheating?



#5 OldPhil

OldPhil

    Doppleganger


  • Members
  • 4,123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island New York
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 17 August 2015 - 05:00 PM

Added enough kind of has me wondering!  You only need a pea sized dollop, much more is not good.


Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#6 discoduck

discoduck
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 45 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 24 August 2015 - 04:18 AM

well im not sure what the problem is, could the wrong kind of thermal paste not work well?



#7 LFos42

LFos42

  • Members
  • 46 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 25 August 2015 - 01:44 PM

When you think of thermal paste, think of a layer of jelly between 2 bread slices. The microprocessor is one bread slice (the actual wafer or the cap over it) and the metal plate of the heat sink is the other bread slice.  The jelly is the thermal paste.  The microprocessor sits flush against a heat sink (metal plate) to help pull heat off the processor and dissipate it via heat spreading fins and fans.  But the surfaces of the microprocessor and the heat plate it's up against don't transfer enough heat just touching against each other and processors will burn up.  The thermal paste (just a super thin layer) greatly increases heat transfer from the microprocessor to the thermal plate on the heat sink. The metal plates actually have little 'micropores' that make the surface less flat, so when the thermal paste is applied it fills in all the pores in the metal and conducts heat much more quickly to the heat sink.

 

The 'wrong kind' to me means just a lower quality, but really they all should work, if applied properly. 

 

The exception to that might be a really thick paste (for example IC Diamond- one of my favorite thermal pastes) which is excellent but darn near impossible to work with.  For a desktop processor, the weight of the cooler and the pressure of the clamps is enough to make the contact (this stuff is just super thick and doesn't really spread easily, but also is less likely to break down).  For a laptop, it would be tough to use because the heat sink clamps and screws don't usually creat as much pressure, so it would take a lot of work to apply.  And, if applied incorrectly, there are air gaps which don't transfer heat at all and completely defeat the point of using a thermal paste -- and fry the processor.

Having said that, I seriously doubt any manufacturer or tech would use it on a laptop without the person specifically demanding it - because it's expensive and a real pain to work with.   T

 

The companies that make thermal pastes actually give detailed instructions on best application techniques for their product depending on how it spreads.  The only real mistake is to not actually cover the whole processor, but it doesn't take much.  Too much does nothing except overflow everywhere and create a mess and potentially short out leads around the processor and other components. (When you press the heat sink down on the processor, it squishes any amount that is 'too much' out the sides, so more is not better, just messier.)

 

Not replacing it, however, would cause your system to get really hot if the thermal paste has broken down over the years, which is normal.  I'm really betting the tech just didn't replace it --> that's pretty common too. And to 'add more' may just give the easy-explained answer of actually replacing the paste.

 

A corrupt bios causing overheating seems less likely. possible. just less likely.

 

You might also download some fan control software and try increasing your fan speeds and see if that helps.  It's not the permanent fix, but it might help in the interim.



#8 discoduck

discoduck
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 45 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 28 August 2015 - 09:53 PM

I need to see about the fan speed control software my computer got up to 140c and cut off. and I have a cooling station I see a program in the download section called

 
 
ill download it and see how that goes

Edited by discoduck, 28 August 2015 - 10:15 PM.


#9 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,073 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:12:25 PM

Posted 29 August 2015 - 07:42 AM

Ever try a chill pad? How about leaving it off for a extended period of time? Is the computer cleaned out free of dust?

Edited by MadmanRB, 29 August 2015 - 07:43 AM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users