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Cyber Security Or Software Development


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#1 slugr

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 08:17 PM

So I'm torn between 2 choices for a degree. I'm starting for 1 of the 2 in about a month, but after talking to our IT Girl at work she got me kinda thinking of switching. I'm currently enrolled for a degree in Software Development. However I've also always been interested and like the security side as well.

 

It all comes down to which one is going to be the most likely to help me land a job and make more?

 

I have a passion for programming, I've already taught myself Java, HTML, CSS and dabled in C as well, which I've enjoyed them all. However I'm currently learning online for fun the Comptia Security + and I'm enjoying that as well.

 

So considering I have a passion for both, I've come to the decision which ever one lands me a job faster and pays better will be the deciding factor for me. Since they're pretty much both equal.

 

I was told that Cyber Security would be the better choice as with software development it can just be outsourced so the job market for Cyber Security will always be better.

 

Looking for some more advice from others currently in the field?



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 08:50 PM

Don't make your decision based on money, you will regret it later.  Money isn't everything.  Do what you enjoy.

 

Security is going to be the big up and comer in the near future.  The problem is that is comes with a lot of responsibility.  The worst part about security is that users are the biggest security threat to any organization.

 

Being self taught is also different from doing it professionally where you have to vault your software and maintain version records.

 

What you enjoy doing personally may not be anything close to what it is like to do it professionally.



#3 slugr

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 09:13 PM

Thanks for the quick reply. What do you decide when you love doing them both currently?

 

Are there still a lot of job oppurtunities for software developers though? I mean there are people in say, India, who sit there and code for 24/7 and do it for pennies on the dollar, so I know a lot of work gets outsourced to them.

 

Don't make your decision based on money, you will regret it later.  Money isn't everything.  Do what you enjoy.

 

Security is going to be the big up and comer in the near future.  The problem is that is comes with a lot of responsibility.  The worst part about security is that users are the biggest security threat to any organization.

 

Being self taught is also different from doing it professionally where you have to vault your software and maintain version records.

 

What you enjoy doing personally may not be anything close to what it is like to do it professionally.



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 13 August 2015 - 09:06 PM

Get some formal training and see if you still love it.  Just because you love doing it on your own isn't an indication that it would be a good career for you.  When you do it on your own you make the rules and decide what works for you.  When you do it professionally there are guild lines, best practices, other people deciding your objectives.  It is a world apart.

 

I really don't know what job availability is like for a software developer.  You'd have to check for job openings in your area to see what they are currently hiring.

 

As I said previously security positions are going to be hot in the up coming years.  Just read the new for what's getting hacked these days.



#5 DeimosChaos

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 10:26 AM

I'll throw some input in there. I have a bachelors degree in Computer Security. I graduated last year. I was able to land a job right away with Amazon, but not in security it was just basic IT. Not the greatest pay, figured I would stay there a year to get some experience (which is the biggest part of getting a job). I ended being there 2 months cause I hated the mundane regular-ness of IT (I had been in part time IT at a school district for a year before that).

 

I then got hired as a software engineer. Again, its not in security, but I have had opportunities to do things with security (and have other opportunists coming up) all because I am one of the very very few people who have any kind of background in security. A software engineer is a pretty high level description as well, software development comes under that as well. I do mostly performance engineering things. But one thing I can say, if you do pursue security the programming background is actually helpful. I do a lot of scripting and making little programs (all linux stuff) to do various things. I have done Java, perl, python, ruby, bash, and there are various other ones used in my work environment. So having that programming experience can get you a job still even if it wasn't what you concentrated on.

So what I am getting at I guess... is its good to have the multiple backgrounds even if you go for a specific thing. There is a lot of security type jobs out there, seems like a lot of them they want experience of some kind. Get the degree and get a job. Experience is experience and you never know what kind of opportunists will pop up.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 24 August 2015 - 10:27 AM.

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#6 slugr

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 12:18 PM

Thanks for the advice. I've always loved programming so for now I'll just stick with what I'm already enrolled in which is software development and progress from there.

 

 

I'll throw some input in there. I have a bachelors degree in Computer Security. I graduated last year. I was able to land a job right away with Amazon, but not in security it was just basic IT. Not the greatest pay, figured I would stay there a year to get some experience (which is the biggest part of getting a job). I ended being there 2 months cause I hated the mundane regular-ness of IT (I had been in part time IT at a school district for a year before that).

 

I then got hired as a software engineer. Again, its not in security, but I have had opportunities to do things with security (and have other opportunists coming up) all because I am one of the very very few people who have any kind of background in security. A software engineer is a pretty high level description as well, software development comes under that as well. I do mostly performance engineering things. But one thing I can say, if you do pursue security the programming background is actually helpful. I do a lot of scripting and making little programs (all linux stuff) to do various things. I have done Java, perl, python, ruby, bash, and there are various other ones used in my work environment. So having that programming experience can get you a job still even if it wasn't what you concentrated on.

So what I am getting at I guess... is its good to have the multiple backgrounds even if you go for a specific thing. There is a lot of security type jobs out there, seems like a lot of them they want experience of some kind. Get the degree and get a job. Experience is experience and you never know what kind of opportunists will pop up.



#7 DeimosChaos

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 12:26 PM

Sounds like a plan! You honestly don't need a degree in security to get into it either. If you want to pursue it after comp sci degree you can just get certs in it. The CISSP cert is one of the top tier certs for Security Professionals, that and a bachelors in just about anything will land you jobs in security.


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#8 slugr

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 12:29 PM

After talking with some local people in my area that already are in Security, I think I'd rather just do software development. From the sounds of it, it doesn't sound like a very fun filled work environment type job.



#9 DeimosChaos

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 12:55 PM

After talking with some local people in my area that already are in Security, I think I'd rather just do software development. From the sounds of it, it doesn't sound like a very fun filled work environment type job.

I guess it all depends on what you want to do and like to do.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 24 August 2015 - 12:55 PM.

OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
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