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Add User Setup Question


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#1 Ubiq

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 01:59 PM

I want to add a "Standard" user to Ubuntu so I can log in without feeling like I might key in something crazy and wipe out my installation. Hopefully, that's what adding a "Standard" user as compared to "Administrator" user does. :bunny:

So...

User Accounts seems straight forward enough. I just want to double check before I restart this little guy under the standard user account.

Do I need to check the "Automatic Login" box to stop it logging in to the Administrator account when the system boots? If I don't check that box, how can I change users?? What is the safest choice for me here?
I feel like I should check the box, but I guess I need to make sure its asking me what I think its asking me.
Thank you!! :love4u:


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

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#2 Al1000

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 02:29 PM

The administrator (root) user on Ubuntu is disabled by default.

You can easily add another user by running this command from your existing user:
sudo useradd guest
Then set a password for log-in:
sudo passwd guest
... where the name of the new user is "guest."

The new user won't be able to use sudo or otherwise have root access (unless you add them to the sudoers file), which I presume is what you're aiming for.

Reboot, or log out, and you should have the choice of logging in as your existing user, or as the new user.

A /home/user/ (which would be /home/guest/ in the above example) directory will be created automatically.

Edited by Al1000, 09 August 2015 - 02:39 PM.


#3 Ubiq

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 03:38 PM

Thank you AI1000!

So when ubuntu calls a user "Administrator" they don't mean the "root" user? I only ask this because I'm listed as "Administrator" in the "User Accounts" window.

When I pulled up a terminal to use "sudo useradd guest", it had the following helpful info at the top:
"To run a command as administrator (user "root"), use "sudo <command>".
See "man sudo_root" for details."
Does this mean the "Administrator" only has "root" user powers when using "sudo" commands? Heh, does that cancel out my first question? Thank you if you can answer as its going to take me FOREVER to read and understand the sudo man pages! So scared of that "sudo"! :unsure: 

But it kinda sounds like that command invokes root privileges.

I have SO MUCH reading to do... :bananas:

 

I have managed to figure out a small part of my original set of questions:

-Adding a "Standard" user was easy and Ubuntu created it automatically so that I can switch between users by clicking the power icon in the top right corner of the screen. I feel like users have a more complicated system on the windows setup at work, so this is dazzling to me.

Also, I discovered that the "Automatic Login" box means Ubuntu automatically fills in my password for that user. Definitely not what I want! I think will definitely be reading some newbie stuff about encryption and firewalls because even though this is technically linux, I'm NOT using this in a secure manner. Any suggestions on this topic would be appreciated.


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#4 Ubiq

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 03:46 PM

"man sudo_root":

"By  default,  the  password  for  the  user "root" (the system
       administrator) is locked. This means you cannot login as  root
       or  use  su.  Instead, the installer will set up sudo to allow
       the user that is created during install to run all administra‐
       tive commands.

       This  means that in the terminal you can use sudo for commands
       that require root privileges. All programs in  the  menu  will
       use  a graphical sudo to prompt for a password. When sudo asks
       for a password, it needs your password, this means that a root
       password is not needed."

 

Oh. Okay, that was not so bad. Are all the man pages this short?  :huh:  So does this mean I don't even need a "standard" user because "root" is a privilege invoked via password?
 


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#5 Al1000

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 03:58 PM

Which version of Ubuntu are you using, and how are you accessing this "User accounts" window?
 

When I pulled up a terminal to use "sudo useradd guest", it had the following helpful info at the top:
"To run a command as administrator (user "root"), use "sudo <command>".

That sounds odd. Have you used sudo before on this operating system?
 

Oh. Okay, that was not so bad. Are all the man pages this short?

man pages are displayed in a viewer called less, which only displays one screen of text at a time. Use either the directional arrows on your keyboard to scroll the text, or press the spacebar to advance to the next screen of text.

(Press Ctrl-b to go back one screen of text at a time in less, and press q to quit less and return to the command prompt)

Edited by Al1000, 09 August 2015 - 03:59 PM.


#6 Ubiq

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 04:43 PM

Ubuntu 15.04

I first accessed "User Accounts" through the desktop gui interface using an icon I don't totally understand yet. It the one in the top left corner with an Ubuntu symbol and when I hover the mouse over it, I get: "Search your computer and online sources". It sure is handy, as its a portal to everything. :huh:

But I found "User Accounts" also by clicking the "System Settings" icon with a gear pic on it.

Do you want a screenshot? Would it be terribly insecure to have user names published in a forum? That's not a big deal is it?

Thank you!


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#7 Al1000

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 05:10 PM

But I found "User Accounts" also by clicking the "System Settings" icon with a gear pic on it.


Thanks, I found it. I think the administrator box just means that your user has root access via the sudo command. So as for your earlier questions:

Does this mean the "Administrator" only has "root" user powers when using "sudo" commands?


Yes.

Also, I discovered that the "Automatic Login" box means Ubuntu automatically fills in my password for that user. Definitely not what I want!


I agree. I wouldn't use that either.

BTW if you haven't done so already, you might want to switch on the firewall, as it is also disabled by default. To do so open a terminal and run:
sudo ufw enable


#8 Ubiq

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 06:36 PM

Also, I discovered that the "Automatic Login" box means Ubuntu automatically fills in my password for that user. Definitely not what I want!

 


I agree. I wouldn't use that either.

BTW if you haven't done so already, you might want to switch on the firewall, as it is also disabled by default. To do so open a terminal and run:

sudo ufw enable

Thank you! I'm going to do that as soon as I get home. Ubuntu has a kind of software button on the left hand side that I was using to look for firewalls. I think this way will be much better. Sorry I can't offer a better description, I'm at work now. It also has an Amazon button, which I'm too scared to click on because shopping sprees should not be that easy for me. Do you think it would be okay for me to get rid of that button?

Another thing I would like your opinion on is encryption of the home folder. I unchecked this option during install because I read somewhere that it would make my system run slow. Do you agree with that assessment? Should I be reading up on how to encrypt my Ubuntu setup?
Thank you!!  :flowers:  :guitar:


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#9 DeimosChaos

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 09:18 PM

 

Also, I discovered that the "Automatic Login" box means Ubuntu automatically fills in my password for that user. Definitely not what I want!

 


I agree. I wouldn't use that either.

BTW if you haven't done so already, you might want to switch on the firewall, as it is also disabled by default. To do so open a terminal and run:

sudo ufw enable

Thank you! I'm going to do that as soon as I get home. Ubuntu has a kind of software button on the left hand side that I was using to look for firewalls. I think this way will be much better. Sorry I can't offer a better description, I'm at work now. It also has an Amazon button, which I'm too scared to click on because shopping sprees should not be that easy for me. Do you think it would be okay for me to get rid of that button?

Another thing I would like your opinion on is encryption of the home folder. I unchecked this option during install because I read somewhere that it would make my system run slow. Do you agree with that assessment? Should I be reading up on how to encrypt my Ubuntu setup?
Thank you!!  :flowers:  :guitar:

 

Yup no need to run encryption on the home directory, and yes it would slow down the use since it has to encrypt and decrypt everything you do. Though if you want your data super secure you can always run that option... I personally am not that paranoid so I don't really care about that option. :P


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#10 Al1000

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 11:35 PM

I personally don't use encryption either. I don't really use my /home directory for storing files in anyway, and keep them all on another partition. That's just something I got into the habit of doing when I was a Windows user.

Thank you! I'm going to do that as soon as I get home. Ubuntu has a kind of software button on the left hand side that I was using to look for firewalls. I think this way will be much better.
Indeed, you would be as well to use the firewall that's already there. This is the one thing that I think should be made more obvious, as I'm not sure how beginners are supposed to know that there is a firewall, or how to enable it.

It also has an Amazon button, which I'm too scared to click on because shopping sprees should not be that easy for me. Do you think it would be okay for me to get rid of that button?
Yes, absolutely. One great thing about Linux is that you can remove just about anything you want to remove. It's not like Windows where some applications are "built-in" and cannot be removed, such as IE.

#11 Ubiq

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 12:15 AM

Thanks AI1000! Wow, it enabled it instantly. So nice.

Last question (for now) if I may: Can I rename my computer? Ubuntu gave it its model name during installation and I was paying attention but not really thinking that I would ever see it again. Now I'm reminded every 10 seconds in a terminal session that I bought a Toshiba Portege.  :rolleyes: 


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#12 Al1000

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 12:38 AM

Yes, you can easily change the name of the computer (host).

All you have to do is edit the file /etc/hostname with any text editor, replacing the current name with the new name. Reboot, and your computer will have a new name.

The file /etc/hostname should contain only the host name. You can easily display it in a terminal using the following command:

cat /etc/hostname
How to edit a file using nano text editor

The only thing to bear in mind is that you are limited as to what characters you can use. Somehow I msnsged to use underscores in the host name on Kubuntu, but usually you can only use letters, numbers and dashes.

Edited by Al1000, 10 August 2015 - 12:41 AM.


#13 Ubiq

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 10:45 PM

Yes, you can easily change the name of the computer (host).

All you have to do is edit the file /etc/hostname with any text editor, replacing the current name with the new name. Reboot, and your computer will have a new name.

The file /etc/hostname should contain only the host name. You can easily display it in a terminal using the following command:
 

cat /etc/hostname
How to edit a file using nano text editor

The only thing to bear in mind is that you are limited as to what characters you can use. Somehow I msnsged to use underscores in the host name on Kubuntu, but usually you can only use letters, numbers and dashes.

 

Thank you!! :bowdown:

That bit at the end sure is important. I tried to run teh command and then hit enter. :blush: But now that I've read the last paragraph of your tutorial, my computer name is finally non-annoying.

I do have a problem with Ubuntu not wanting to display anything other than the desktop wallpaper when hooked to my telly through the hdmi cable. Should I make a separate post for this? I'm not even sure where to begin looking for the problem. I tried a search in the Ubuntu forums for hdmi issues, but it was all way over my head. Not sure how to narrow my search. Also, my little guy is halfway there, I just need to convince him to display firefox.
Many thanks for any advice!! How can I repay you guys? :flowers:


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#14 cat1092

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 01:47 AM

 

 

How can I repay you guys?  :flowers:

 

Ubiq, you owe us nothing! :)

 

We're a self-help community forum for those in need, some may not be able to afford a tech for a simple issue, those wanting to learn how to maintain their computers safely or those who wants to learn as much as possible. We're here for everyone whom needs us, as long as the reason is legit (nothing illegal in nature allowed). Other than that, the forum is open to all questions from users across the globe. 

 

You can always contribute by assisting others in your spare time, that's how I began to learn, and for everything that I learned, passed the knowledge on to others. Even if it's only an hour or so per week, that is, if that's what you want to do, there's no requirement to 'repay' anyone. 

 

Thanks for the thought & am glad that your issue was resolved in a short period of time. Come back anytime. :)

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 Al1000

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 02:26 AM

I do have a problem with Ubuntu not wanting to display anything other than the desktop wallpaper when hooked to my telly through the hdmi cable. Should I make a separate post for this?

Yes, as this will be related to graphics.

Many thanks for any advice!! How can I repay you guys?

I'm just glad to have been of some assistance. Don't pay it back; pay it forward. :)




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