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Windows 10 can disable pirated games and unauthorised hardware


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#31 Willabong

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 08:38 AM

Gordon Kelly took issue with that, citing this clause in the Privacy Statement: “We will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary.

 

 

​All Microsoft are doing is reaffirming what the paranoid US security forces (read NSA CIA FBI) has already imposed via the backdoor on ALL internet companies and computer giants such as Google/Apple/Microsoft/Facebook and Twitter and others. Refusal to disclose this information when requested or to collect it  would bring real reprisals against these companies. This is not a fault of MS alone, they are just more open about it.

 

And who could ever prove that we live in a free world, or country, or even house? 



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#32 rp88

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 09:46 AM

Post #16, that's the risk I have been predicting all along. It is in the user's interests for everyone to refuse to allow it to happen.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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#33 gigawert

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 11:25 AM

Not right away but I think Microsoft's plan is to eventually require all software to be installed only through the Store.

 

Microsoft will take a cut from the developer on every install.

That post was posted a while ago but I sincerely hope that that theory is not going to come true. :(


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#34 gigawert

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 11:26 AM

Post #16, that's the risk I have been predicting all along. It is in the user's interests for everyone to refuse to allow it to happen.

If it does happen though, I have a Windows 7 installation disc and I know how to use it. lol


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#35 jargos

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 09:35 PM

Gordon Kelly took issue with that, citing this clause in the Privacy Statement: “We will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary.

 

 

​All Microsoft are doing is reaffirming what the paranoid US security forces (read NSA CIA FBI) has already imposed via the backdoor on ALL internet companies and computer giants such as Google/Apple/Microsoft/Facebook and Twitter and others. Refusal to disclose this information when requested or to collect it  would bring real reprisals against these companies. This is not a fault of MS alone, they are just more open about it.

 

And who could ever prove that we live in a free world, or country, or even house?

 

 

We must all live under the rule of law. The law must always be more powerful than the citizen. If you don't like this, go into politics, or agitate your political representatives, and change the law.

 

However, it is trite obfuscation of the issue to compare NSA, CIA, FBI ..(the law) to MSFT, and then subsequently, acquiesce to similar powers being taken by MSFT.


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#36 Willabong

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 03:53 AM

Jargos, you miss the point of my post:  MS is also a victim here! The US security services with the weight of the US government behind them, has forced MS and others into this information collecting situation. It's a question of 'do it or face the weight of the law'.



#37 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 07:06 AM

Jargos, you miss the point of my post:  MS is also a victim here! The US security services with the weight of the US government behind them, has forced MS and others into this information collecting situation. It's a question of 'do it or face the weight of the law'.

 

If that was the case Microsoft would not give the option to turn off telemetry on the Enterprise version. And I know for a fact that linux distros do not gather your personal info similar to what Windows 10 is doing.  XP, 7, and even 8.1 do not gather info like 10.

 

You can prevent providing your browsing history to your ISP if you use a live linux distro like Tails and a Tor browser. Your ISP would know you use TOR but they would have no idea what sites you were visiting so I can't understand your reasoning that the US government is forcing Microsoft to do this when there are easy wasy to circumvent the ISP "backdoor".

 

The CIA uses Secure Enhanced Linux for their OS so there must be some reasoning behind that.



#38 Willabong

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 07:22 AM

You honestly think Linux even using Tor is safe? If security forces can spy on presidents of friendly countries such as Germany and France, do you honestly think there aren't ways to collect information from Linux PC's even when using Tor?  If you do, then you are more naive than I am!    



#39 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 07:42 AM

Of course it is safe. It was developed by and Funded by the US government to bypass censorship in other countries but they cannot themselves defeat it yet. Edit: I am not saying it will be uncrackable but I can assure you thay by usiing it your personal data will not be aquired similar to using Edge in Microsoft. Edit Edit: And if Tor was not safe then their would be no reason even for it to exist.

 

While the NSA and GCHQ haven’t breached the Tor network directly, they’re trying. The Guardian reports that the duo is dabbling in proof-of-concept attacks that entail mass surveillance of the Tor network, or a mixture of tapping core Internet cables while simultaneously controlling a large number of Tor’s “exit nodes,” which deliver unencrypted requests to website servers.

The government agencies have also discussed “shaping” future Tor development to increase crackability—as the NSA did with NIST encryption standards and backdoors in other software —or actively disrupting Tor to drive users off the network.

 

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2052149/tor-stands-strong-against-the-nsa-but-your-browser-can-bring-you-down.html

 

An extract of a Top Secret appraisal by the National Security Agency (NSA) characterized Tor as "the King of high-secure, low-latency Internet anonymity" with "no contenders for the throne in waiting",[9] and the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology deemed it, with approximately 2.5 million users daily "by far the most popular anonymous internet communication system." [10] Furthermore, a July 2015 NATO analysis opines that "the use of anonymisation technologies such as Tor will continue to thrive. Despite the attention that Tor has received worldwide, the technical and legal questions surrounding it remain relatively unexplored." [11]

 


 

Tor, or The Onion Router, is a cryptographic technique first implemented by US Navy research to permit intelligence agents to use the internet without being traced, by encrypting and routing communications through many different internet servers. Subsequently, Tor has been developed by the US university MIT and by the California internet rights watchdog the Electronic Frontier Foundation and subsequently incorporated into Wikileaks.

 

Groups such as Indymedia recommend Tor for safeguarding their members' online privacy and security. Activist groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) recommend Tor as a mechanism for maintaining civil liberties online. Corporations use Tor as a safe way to conduct competitive analysis, and to protect sensitive procurement patterns from eavesdroppers. They also use it to replace traditional VPNs, which reveal the exact amount and timing of communication. Which locations have employees working late? Which locations have employees consulting job-hunting websites? Which research divisions are communicating with the company's patent lawyers?

A branch of the U.S. Navy uses Tor for open source intelligence gathering, and one of its teams used Tor while deployed in the Middle East recently. Law enforcement uses Tor for visiting or surveilling web sites without leaving government IP addresses in their web logs, and for security during sting operations.

The variety of people who use Tor is actually part of what makes it so secure. Tor hides you among the other users on the network, so the more populous and diverse the user base for Tor is, the more your anonymity will be protected.

 


Edited by JohnC_21, 16 August 2015 - 07:47 AM.


#40 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 07:55 AM

Here is another article from Bloomberg.

The Inside Story of Tor, the Best Internet Anonymity Tool the Government Ever Built
Countering Tor is clearly frustrating for the NSA, and Internet users have taken note. Hits to Tor’s download page almost quadrupled last year, to 139 million. “Encryption works,” Bruce Schneier, a cybersecurity expert who helped the Guardian analyze the Snowden documents, said at a talk in New York in January. “That’s the lesson of Tor. The NSA can’t break Tor, and it pisses them off.”

 

 



#41 gigawert

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 10:44 AM

Guys, just use a VPN if you were thinking about using Tor.


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#42 Willabong

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 11:41 AM

Well you could be right? ..... But then again, if the security forces had found a way to break TOR encryption, do you honestly think they are going to tell the people who use it?



#43 jargos

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 09:32 PM

Jargos, you miss the point of my post:  MS is also a victim here! The US security services with the weight of the US government behind them, has forced MS and others into this information collecting situation. It's a question of 'do it or face the weight of the law'.

 

Hmmm .. what then of those using OS's like Linux ?


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#44 jargos

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 09:35 PM

You honestly think Linux even using Tor is safe? If security forces can spy on presidents of friendly countries such as Germany and France, do you honestly think there aren't ways to collect information from Linux PC's even when using Tor?  If you do, then you are more naive than I am!    

 

I think you continue to conflate two very seperate issues. The law, spy agencies, et al, are one thing. Just because they CAN get away with whatever it is that they get away with (and I'm not condoning it, BTW) it does NOT follow that Microsoft, Google, etc, should be able to do the same for ends of their own.


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#45 brainout

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 11:54 PM

Yeah, jargos: the bigger thing that Willabong keeps skating over is Paragraph 3 of the Services Agreement, where MSFT takes upon itself the role of Big Brother to dictate that if IT feels you've been illegal or immoral or harmful IT will even bork or remove 'content' from your machine.  Which can only mean, it has total access to everything on your machine and it POLICES your 'content'.

 

Goes far beyond web activity, and far beyond merely 'knowing'. No government does that.  Well, except the Soviet Union during NKVD days, and of course Hitler's Germany.  And if governments wanted to do that, they would mandate back doors in Linux machines too, even when offline.  But since it's open source, we know there are no back doors.  So it can only be true that MSFT is doing this on its own, not coerced or influenced by Government.

 

This will be challenged, it will be in the courts for a long time and often, and anyone dumb enough or dishonest enough to praise MSFT for this needs medication and ostracism.

 

And, the backlash has already started.  Amazon reviews tend to be the canary in the coal mine.  The trend is even worse than back when Win8 first came out, so a whole bunch of people are really unhappy right now, what between the borked installations and the realization their computers are policing snoops.

 

Heartbreaking.


Edited by brainout, 17 August 2015 - 12:02 AM.

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