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Windows 10 can disable pirated games and unauthorised hardware


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 07 August 2015 - 05:38 PM

 

By signing EULA, you have allowed Windows 10 to disable counterfeit games and hardware that are not authorized

According to the Microsoft’s new Services Terms effective August 1st, Microsoft can stop you from using unauthorized hardware or from playing counterfeit games. Microsoft services such as Office 365, Outlook.com, Skype, OneDrive, Xbox Live, MSN, and Bing are also covered by the new services terms.

The terms are also applicable to software using a Microsoft account, which would mean that it would also have an effect on most Windows 10 users. Majority of the users use Microsoft’s latest OS with an account from the Redmond company, even though when they have an option to use it without an account.

Windows 10 can disable pirated games and unauthorised hardware

 

I do not have a problem with MS disabling pirate software, BUT, I am the only 1 who decides what hardware is or is not authorised NOT MS.



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#2 gigawert

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Posted 07 August 2015 - 05:44 PM

Now that everybody knows, gamers who play pirated games will probably stick with Windows 7. I agree with you though.


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#3 Jighen

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 05:04 AM

I like Windows 10, but what are the chances people will eventually find a way to circumvent this rather extreme choice?



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 07:30 AM

Let's see how it is implemented before we pass judgement.  EULA are written by lawyers who aren't going to be the same people figuring how to disable things.

 

Microsoft will have to tread very softly when it comes to disabling things.  The first time they "accidentally"  disable purchased products or enterprise hardware the blow back will be so strong it will be a while before they try it again and they may even remove it from the EULA.

 

Worrying about it now is only borrowing trouble.



#5 TCSNinc

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 08:40 AM

I'm more concerned as to how far up my crapper MS and the NSA have their noses buried to detect pirated games on my PC.

 

It's like over ten billion people in this world of ours but peek-a-boo we've got enough agents (and time on our hands) to only watch YOU.



#6 TCSNinc

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 08:50 AM

Imagine this...somewhere along the lines the developer, publisher or retailer hides a 'dial home' file in their software.

Tripped if certain criteria are not met.

 

Now not going above the scope of a software forum and breaking into discussion about 'Small Worlds After All' and simulacrums

This will inevitably dial up the PTB with every thirteen-year-old hacker on the planet....kinda like the ending of The Lawnmower Man.

 

Now if everyone is busy flipping switches on renegade adolescents who's gonna be watching to try and stop

the extremists from getting into the White House and taking Obama over their knee?



#7 rp88

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 12:39 PM

Post #1, I am assuming that they can't do anything to apply this to older operating systems. I'll be extrememly cautious about updates for now though, only things which patch vulnerabilities are getting through.

Because if they start disabling games, they can disable programs, and if they disable programs then they have the capability to block open source programs, or any other programs where ms doesn't get a share of profit from the software's sale. They might want to block every open source solitaire game for example(to force users to pay them or see adverts), and block every open source media player (to force users to pay them for their own dvd playing software), block open/libre office to force users to buy ms office...

Also, I suspect, they won't be able to do this by blacklist (known pirated games X.exe, Y.exe and Z.exe are banned from running), they'll to do it by whitelist (only known legitimate games A.exe, B.exe and C.exe can be run, anything else, including legitimate but rare or old games, is banned) which will obviously have terrible consequnces for anyone using a program rare enough that ms hasn't heard of it.

And ofcourse, I agree that it's a user's right to choose what hardware is authorised AS WELL as what software.

Edited by rp88, 08 August 2015 - 12:41 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#8 Kilroy

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 01:14 PM

TCSNinc, the number of applications that dial home these days it astronomical.  It is a publisher's best hope of preventing copy right violations and punishing those that violate your copy right.  I used to work with two gentlemen who lost their jobs for installing unlicensed software on their company computers.  When the company that made the software requested payment they were tracked down and dismissed, no questions asked, no excuses accepted.  They were very good at their job, but put the company at risk.

 

rp88 while a white list would be the optimal way to prevent content from running it is not practical in a large non-standard environment.  I've worked for many large companies that had more than 400 different applications, that they knew about.  When you start talking R&D facilities the number gets much higher and down time is much more expensive.  A lot of R&D applications are very specific and unique.  Attempting to white list would inevitably kill legitimate working software.  The class action suit that would follow would be sufficient to kill a software company, be it Apple or Microsoft.

 

Again, until this is actually done it is much ado about nothing.  Trust me, it will be known the first time this is done.

 

Hardware isn't much different.  Just take a look at the number of system boards you can purchase to build a machine.  Add to the all of the manufacturer equipment and white listing every possible board and USB device would be too much effort with a potential for leaving out too much equipment.

 

On the other hand whatever device they use could be used to prevent virus infection, at least temporarily until the virus writers figured out how a program is identified.



#9 TCSNinc

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 03:34 PM

 then they have the capability to block open source programs, or any other programs where ms doesn't get a share of profit from the software's sale. They might want to block every open source solitaire game for example(to force users to pay them or see adverts), and block every open source media player (to force users to pay them for their own dvd playing software), block open/libre office to force users to buy ms office...

 

It's a bit of a worry and easy to cry accident or claim that more philanthropic developers didn't dot all of their "I"s nor cross all of their "T"s

 

Sounding almost as if 10 is just a 3 GB .net upgrade.

 

Windows 10 - Now with 40% more NSA!

Fu-shaw!



#10 Beel

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 12:44 AM

http://www.pcauthority.com.au/News/407894,microsoft-can-disable-your-pirated-games-and-illegal-hardware.aspx?eid=6&edate=20150814&utm_source=20150814&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=gaming_newsletter&nl=gaming

 

Mod Edit:  Merged topics, same subject matter - Hamluis.


Edited by hamluis, 14 August 2015 - 07:44 AM.


#11 reckonankit

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 01:29 AM

thanks for sharing link its look like great now piracy of software will be stopped and geniune installation of product will be incrase. those software maker makes software to sell or want to generat revenue they now relax



#12 Aura

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 05:20 AM

Well, no one should have pirated software and illegal hardware in the first place, so it's too bad for them.

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#13 Kilroy

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 05:54 AM

The more I think about this the worse I see it for Microsoft.  Once Microsoft removes another company's software, whether legally installed or not, it will start to cause issues.  If they remove properly paid for software then the users will complain.  If they uninstall software for one company than every other company can start to complain that you removed their pirated software why won't you remove ours?

 

I'm going to with hold judgement until Microsoft starts using this ability.  Just because they can doesn't mean that they will.  There is no point in worrying about this until it starts happening.



#14 hamluis

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 07:56 AM

The analogy that I see...is that it's similar to the rights of cable/satellite corporations...to protect the LEGAL use of the services provided.  Windows is sold/issued with express legal concerns that (IMO) bind users of said service to specific contractual obligations/privileges regarding LEGAL use of the product/service.

 

Considering the fact that Microsoft could (IMO) discontinue service because users of their services are NOT proceeding in accordance with a voluntarily agreed to EULA...I would say that it's better to have said software removed than to have the Windows installation invalidated and thus...of no value to those users who fall into subject category.

 

The groundwork for this has already been laid, IMO...and should stand up to any realistic, rational approach to such.  Too many users act as if they have acquired a material interest in the Windows versions...when they have only purchased the right to use said service in accordance with the terms of use/EULA/attendant contract.  All ownership rights have always belonged to Microsoft...regarding use of Windows...and always will.

 

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#15 brainout

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 08:50 AM

Yep, rp88, you're very perceptive.  Telemetry, altering the OS and therefore altering what programs can be on our machines, altering what hardware.. salami tactics.  You first take a little slice off the salami and see if anyone notices.  If not, you take another slice. Then another. Until, it's all gone.

 

For this is how Hitler, Mussolini, Stalyin and Mao all got started.  Pick on an alleged known evil everyone agrees they dislike (Jews, inept government, Jews, foreigners, respectively).  Doesn't matter if the evil is real, as bad as they claim.. what matters, is everyone AGREES.  Yeah, like the EULA, something to which we AGREE.

 

Then, salami tactic away everything.  The Code of Conduct in Paragraph 3 of the Microsoft Services Agreement, which is incorporated by reference into Paragraph 1b of the EULA, makes MSFT your big brother.

 

Sadly, everyone who dislikes (valid or not) practices prohibited in that Code, will sign it, not thinking.  Until, like Niemoller said, 'they came for me'.

 

Liberals believe in big government as a savior.  Certain brands of conservatism (like Fascism) believe in big government aligned to big business as savior.  Fact is, whatever big government or big business touches, turns to doo-doo.  When anything gets too big, it gets too bad.  So the big starts to religify; then there's rebellion and war, then everything goes back to being small again.  Painfully.  And then, the process of getting bigger starts anew.

 

That's what's happening now: the rebellion phase.  Earlier than it happened last century, in Germany.  We learn from history that we learn nothing from history.  And this history, is also parallel now to the Reformation and Orwell's 1984, all at once.

 

 

Post #1, I am assuming that they can't do anything to apply this to older operating systems. I'll be extrememly cautious about updates for now though, only things which patch vulnerabilities are getting through.

Because if they start disabling games, they can disable programs, and if they disable programs then they have the capability to block open source programs, or any other programs where ms doesn't get a share of profit from the software's sale. They might want to block every open source solitaire game for example(to force users to pay them or see adverts), and block every open source media player (to force users to pay them for their own dvd playing software), block open/libre office to force users to buy ms office...

Also, I suspect, they won't be able to do this by blacklist (known pirated games X.exe, Y.exe and Z.exe are banned from running), they'll to do it by whitelist (only known legitimate games A.exe, B.exe and C.exe can be run, anything else, including legitimate but rare or old games, is banned) which will obviously have terrible consequnces for anyone using a program rare enough that ms hasn't heard of it.

And ofcourse, I agree that it's a user's right to choose what hardware is authorised AS WELL as what software.


Edited by brainout, 14 August 2015 - 09:38 AM.

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