Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

6 things that Windows10 took from Linux


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 paul88ks

paul88ks

  • Members
  • 1,287 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:10:37 PM

Posted 02 August 2015 - 07:07 PM

 

http://itsfoss.com/windows-10-inspired-linux/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=6_linux_features_that_inspired_windows_10_and_other_linux_stories

Very Interesting Read!



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 gigawert

gigawert

  • Members
  • 1,304 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:08:37 PM

Posted 02 August 2015 - 07:11 PM

Wow, that is interesting! I kind of noticed it before but didn't think of it as such a big deal.


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#3 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,287 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:10:37 PM

Posted 02 August 2015 - 07:23 PM

I don't even know where those features are in Win 10 yet-as i just installed it a couple of days ago!



#4 mremski

mremski

  • Members
  • 493 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NH
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 03 August 2015 - 04:17 AM

Interesting, but a minor quibble.  Multiple workspaces were available before KDE 1.0 :)


FreeBSD since 3.3, only time I touch Windows is to fix my wife's computer


#5 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,998 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 04:45 AM

Was interesting, Microsoft must have had a couple of Linux devs working on the Windows 10 release. 

 

This is a negative for Linux users, as Windows 10 now has some of the features we've had a long time. 

 

However, one feature they'll never be able to copycat is the robust inbuilt security that Linux distros has, w/out the need for extra security. For Windows 10, Windows Defender alone will fall far short of protecting it's users & will be a drag on lower spec computers, as it's nearly constantly running in the background. The proof of this is when running CCleaner after a few hours of use, there'll be at least 12-15 scan reports shown to be deleted. This means that other than Windows Defender being 'baseline' protection, it's using resources that could be put to better use. 

 

Anyone wanting Windows 10 is best off purchasing a subscription to a quality AV, or at a minimum add an AM software such as Malwarebytes. If one has a lifetime license, it can be transferred to the computer, if not already installed. 

 

In reality, Microsoft really took nothing, looking at the big picture. As far as Microsoft Edge, which will replace IE goes, it still has rough edges & has no hope of catching up with Google Chrome with their massive lead, or even Firefox. 

 

What isn't mentioned, is that unless some settings are changed, one is giving up privacy for the OS, even their wireless connection when guests with a Microsoft account in your connection list comes over. They'll be automatically allowed wireless access. Cortana also doesn't work well, if at all, with some computers. A webcam & microphone will be needed for this & one not too old. Finally, as with Windows 8.1, only improved, Microsoft can keep track their users as long as one's notebook is with them. It's up to the consumer to customize these settings, some will disable Cortana by default. If you have a notebook & want to be 100% sure that your webcam & mic aren't watching you, either remove it or place a piece of black electrical tape or gray duck tape over these, depending on color of the trim. And where possible, use an Ethernet connection over wireless, unless needed, disable Bluetooth. If you don't need OneDrive, create a Local Account, this will be allowed after the upgrade. A Local Account provides greater privacy. 

 

And unlike Windows 7, 8 & 8.1, if you want OneDrive, one has to be signed into a Microsoft Account. So while one may gain a few features, we have to examine what we're giving up. The OS itself is fine & snappy, if only they weren't so interested in tracking our every move, it may turn out to be a good one. Now we'll see if they can break the record set by XP in early 2007, with over 77% of the computers on the planet running that OS. Windows 7 had a chance, but the 8 release ruined most likely the best OS that MS had built from breaking the record. Making matters worse, while consumers wanted Windows 7 & avoided 8/8.1 like the plague, Microsoft continued to pour cash into a dead OS & ignored it's largest user base, wouldn't even offer SP2 for Windows 7. 

 

One last word & I'm out, if one expects MS to keep their word to support Windows 10 'for the lifetime of the device', keep in mind that they said the same about Windows 8, only to change CPU requirements & blocked many from upgrading to 8.1, in essence stealing $40 + tax from these consumers, who'll have to downgrade to Windows 7 by January 12 of next year to continue to be supported. So what if they pull another stunt in a SP & require the CPU to have a higher CompareExchange value than 128? That means the same, back to 7, or Linux. 

 

All may seem to be good for now, just wait until older devices that was upgraded to Windows 7 from Vista or XP & now on 10, has no drivers when a new SP is released (what 8.1 was to Windows 8). Lets see how early Intel GMA, onboard ATI, VIA graphics & Sound Blaster Hi-Fi & SoundMax hi-def audio cards runs in a couple of years & then we'll see what type of 'lifetime' support looks like. That 'support' will likely be to suggest & possibly assisting with downgrading back to the original OS upgraded from. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,716 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:01:37 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 05:17 AM

 

However, one feature they'll never be able to copycat is the robust inbuilt security that Linux distros

I beg to differ.

 

Linux is only secure because.

 

Here's a short list.

 

It has a small user base.

Most malware is made for Windows.

You only get software from trusted repos and PPA's.

Downloading tarballs from somesite.com is not safe. Same thing applies for bash scripts.

 

People who owned Mac's used to say Mac is secure blah blah, and there have been some nasty things hit it.

 

It is not that hard to lock Windows down to make it more secure.

Answers to common security questions - Best Practices  
How to detect vulnerable programs using Secunia Personal Software Inspector <- Everyone should do this!
Simple and easy ways to keep your computer safe and secure on the Internet <- Everyone must read this!

 

When I used Windows I always ran Faronics Deep Freeze.

 

Deep Freeze Alternatives and Similar Software ...

#7 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 08:26 AM

 

 

However, one feature they'll never be able to copycat is the robust inbuilt security that Linux distros

I beg to differ.

 

Linux is only secure because.

 

Here's a short list.

 

It has a small user base.

Most malware is made for Windows.

You only get software from trusted repos and PPA's.

Downloading tarballs from somesite.com is not safe. Same thing applies for bash scripts.

 

People who owned Mac's used to say Mac is secure blah blah, and there have been some nasty things hit it.

 

It is not that hard to lock Windows down to make it more secure.

Answers to common security questions - Best Practices  
How to detect vulnerable programs using Secunia Personal Software Inspector <- Everyone should do this!
Simple and easy ways to keep your computer safe and secure on the Internet <- Everyone must read this!

 

When I used Windows I always ran Faronics Deep Freeze.

 

Deep Freeze Alternatives and Similar Software ...

 

I agree Nick. The unfortunate misconception is that Linux is totally and forever safe. While it may be pretty safe at the moment, it doesn't mean that it will always be safe and secure. The more Linux gains ground and more people start using it the more the bad guys will target it. If someone wants to build a nasty piece of software for Linux they will find a way, there are some pretty smart people out there. Now I still tell people they should use Linux because it is safer and more secure at the moment. Hopefully we will never have to fight off as many viruses and malware as Windows has.

 

I had to deal with deep freeze on school computers when I worked IT for a school district... man was that piece of software one pain in the rear end! One computer its fine, but an entire lab that are already dirt slow computers.... oh man... took an hour and a half just to get deep freeze turned off to run updates... 


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#8 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 09:18 AM

Just fully read the article... the Windows package management is actually kind of interesting.. I wonder what brought about them wanting to be able to install things via the command line. Hardly any typical Windows users will even use that feature. When I get my Alienware laptop I may have to check that out...


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#9 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,967 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:03:37 AM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 11:14 AM

cat1092 post#5


It won't work for the microphone, but webcams can be realiably disabled by fashioning a small box out of thin cardboard (the sort you get on the back page of a pad of paper), then cutting into the edges of this box in such a way that it has slots to fit over the top of the screen and obscure the camera. It's ugly to look at, but it's a quick and easy way of making sure the camera is physically unable to see anything, unlike duct tape it can easily be removed and replaced thousdands of times without leaving any stains. Careful sizing of the box will ensure that it's edge hangs low enough to cover the lens but high enough not to obscure any of the screen. This won't physically block sound though, the jack of a microphone, with no microhpone attached, plugged into the jack's socket should deactivate the system's built in mic though.


Also, when it comes to antivirus security users of any windows OS should consider running Noscript (or an equivalent script blocker) in their browser, and also running an anti-exploit program and an ad-blocker (so many viruses are spread by malvertising these days). That is to say, all those tools ALONGSIDE an antivirus and an antimalware program. Windows users without scriptblocking can expect to be infected within hours, as soon as they accidentally visit a nasty site or deliberately visit a legitimate site only to find it has malvertising round it's corners. Users of linux operating systems might consider noscript and an ad blocker if they want extra security, although they don't need it as much as windows users because even if their browser is exploited a virus attacking a linux user will find itself on a type of machine it wasn't coded for and won't be able to run.

Edited by rp88, 18 August 2015 - 11:17 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#10 mremski

mremski

  • Members
  • 493 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NH
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 12:05 PM

If you do the box thing over the camera, be sure to put a picture of an eye on the inside or line the inside with black felt or aluminum foil.


FreeBSD since 3.3, only time I touch Windows is to fix my wife's computer


#11 shelf life

shelf life

  • Malware Response Team
  • 2,646 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:@localhost
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 18 August 2015 - 12:58 PM

 

Linux is only secure because.

 

When you install Windows you are a Admin account, not so in Linux.

 

Hence malware has full system privileges right from the start.

 

MS tried to water it down with the introduction of the UAC prompts. Most people probably just turn the feature off and run has a admin account.

 

Every MS remote code bulletin ends with this line:   "Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights."

 

 


How Can I Reduce My Risk to Malware?


#12 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,967 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:03:37 AM

Posted 19 August 2015 - 12:07 PM

mremski post#10:
Why?
When the camera cannot see anything but the inside of a sheet of cardboard who cares what the cardboard looks like?

Edited by rp88, 19 August 2015 - 12:07 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#13 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,998 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 21 August 2015 - 02:07 AM

If you do the box thing over the camera, be sure to put a picture of an eye on the inside or line the inside with black felt or aluminum foil.

 

What's this supposed to do? I can see maybe felt on the inside to prevent scratching if the fit is too snug & there's none leftover to make another, aluminum foil may cause destruction by scratching the lens. 

 

The Logitech branded webcams that I use on my desktop PC's has a flip at the top that covers the camera eye completely. I suppose designed this way to protect the lens when not in use or for when traveling & the mic for one of mine is not built in, rather is still sealed in the package (older model). Those whom doesn't have the type with a flip down cover can simply unplug the device from the USB port, if not built into the computer. Many older, yet still usable notebooks didn't include a webcam. or is of so poor quality that it may as well not be there, makes an external webcam a necessity for some users to use services such as Skype, record YouTube videos or use the webcam as a motion detection device, my primary use for these devices, as I cannot afford quite yet a full room motion camera that's on my wish list. 

 

The suggestion about the duct tape was aimed at notebook users with inbuilt webcam & microphone & I got the idea from Richard Stallman in one of his articles. His intake on security is to keep things simple, sometimes going further back in time than some of us may want to hear. Simple & effective, one can test this out for themselves by going through the motions of recording a video & include some sounds (a barking dog is excellent) to ensure the inbuilt mic is also blocked. If any audio gets through (likely won't), then place a very small piece of any type of thin solid plastic over the mic & then carefully place the duct tape (or electrical tape) over both, making sure the small piece of plastic doesn't shift away from the mic. 

 

I'd never consider placing duct tape over my external webcams, if the computer is in a place that makes disconnecting the cable difficult, then rp88's idea is good, anything to cover that webcam if it doesn't have a flip down lid. 

 

shelf life in Post #11 above makes some great points. Windows 10 took nothing from Linux in any of the points made in his post. 

 

Most of these are features taken from Linux likely wasn't from the brand (though could have been inspired from Ubuntu), rather Microsoft was catching up with the tunes of the times. It's the things not in the article that should concern us the most, on a security perspective. Anyone noticed that Intel HECI (or ME) was included, whether or not it was on the computer when purchased or before upgrading to 10? This backdoor can be disabled from the CCleaner Startup interface (two lines) under Scheduled Tasks or Context Menu. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 21 August 2015 - 02:11 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 wizardfromoz

wizardfromoz

  • Banned
  • 2,799 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:37 PM

Posted 21 August 2015 - 03:33 AM

#es 6 and 7

 

@NickAu and Deimos Chaos

 

No offence guys, but look at the bigger picture.

 

Through the Android influence across the spectrum Linux is the largest operating system in the world, and Firefox the most popular browser. Let alone talking about servers up to super computers at NASA running Linux.

 

What did we have in 2014? Heartbleed and Shellshock, the Bash Bug.

 

From Wikipedia

 

 

Shellshock, also known as Bashdoor, is a family of security bugs in the widely used Unix Bash shell, the first of which was disclosed on 24 September 2014.

 

... and NickAu was one of the first to report on it, at this site.

 

HOWEVER, Shellshock was only made known because Stéphane Chazelas spilled his guts to Chet Ramey.

 

Prior to that, the flaw was unknown for 18 - 20 years.

 

Once the blackhats started making exploits, 500 million computers were supposed to be at risk (LInux numbers higher than supposed?), but the difference between Microsoft and the Linux community is that Linux people had the situation under control within hours, 24 at the max, and kernel changes were made, widespread amongst the distros, whether Debian-based or RPM (& Redhat being amongst the first).

 

What's that leave? Heartbleed. I won't go off topic any more, with that.

 

Linux is the safest system on the planet.

 

Kudos to paul88, for an interesting Topic.

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

BTW rp88 - have you actually installed AND RUN A LINUX DISTRO YET, and how did you find it?



#15 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,716 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:01:37 PM

Posted 21 August 2015 - 05:25 AM

 

Linux is the safest system on the planet.

Linux is just an operating system that can be exploited and hacked,

 

People who use Mac used to say the same thing Linux users say, And now ?






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users