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Best Linux Intro Book for a Total Beginner?


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#1 Ubiq

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 03:57 PM

Hello!

 

I'm working toward using either Mint or Ubuntu through usb while learning generally about linux. My ultimate goal is to have my home desktop machine set up with linux for my personal use.

I'm reading through some of the books in the free ebooks pin above, but I'm looking for a basic old timey real book I can lug in my bag to read at work on downtimes.

However...

There are many, many beginner books out there. I need one that doesn't assume I'm a computer master.

I'm considering the following titles. Please let me know if any of these would be good for me or if I should consider something else. Many thanks!! :flowers:

 

:step1: http://www.amazon.com/How-Linux-Works-Superuser-Should/dp/1593275676/ref=pd_bxgy_14_text_y

 

I'm no superuser. Over my head?

 

:step2: http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=15649152148&searchurl=sts%3Dt%26tn%3Dthe+linux+command+line

 

I'm really leaning toward this one.

 

:step3: https://www.goodreads.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&query=linux+for+dummies

 

Ehh, which edition? Which author is best?


Edited by Ubiq, 02 August 2015 - 03:58 PM.

Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 04:24 PM

There is a whole bunch of free books here.

Have links to good (free) Linux & LibreOffice e-books? Share them here.

 

.



#3 Ubiq

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 07:38 PM

Thanks NickAu!  :hug:

Yes, that is the link I referenced.
However, as mentioned, I need a hard copy book because I don't have an e-reader and I want something I can carry about. Printing large-ish ebooks also isn't something I'm wanting to do right now. And my local library is kind of weird about the computer books because most of them get stolen apparently. I'm just looking for a book to buy. 

 

Linux All-in-One For Dummies, 5th Edition (2014) is the Dummies title listed in the e-book list. There are so many different Linux for Dummies versions. In your opinion, is it the best of the Dummies books out for someone like me? 

 

Linux Mint Essentials is in the e-book list also, and I'm reading it, but since it's only available as an e-book and is oriented toward one distro, I'm not sure it's what I'm looking for right now. But I think I will reference it often if that is the distro I decide to go with on a usb stick.

 

Thank you to anyone who has any more thoughts to offer.  :flowers:


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#4 gigawert

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 08:13 PM

I prefer Ubuntu because it has a nice interface and is very easy to use.


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#5 Ubiq

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 09:08 PM

I prefer Ubuntu because it has a nice interface and is very easy to use.

Thanks Gigawert!!

It is very popular isn't it? I wonder if it will run as well Mint from a usb stick? Isn't it supposed to be a bit bigger than Mint? Anyway, have you read Ubuntu for Dummies? Thank you! :flowers:


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#6 gigawert

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 09:14 PM

 

I prefer Ubuntu because it has a nice interface and is very easy to use.

Thanks Gigawert!!

It is very popular isn't it? I wonder if it will run as well Mint from a usb stick? Isn't it supposed to be a bit bigger than Mint? Anyway, have you read Ubuntu for Dummies? Thank you! :flowers:

 

It should run well. Ubuntu 14.04 fits perfectly with about 200 MB of free space on a 2 GB USB drive. No, I haven't read it but Linux for Dummies is available at my local library, which I'm going to get. :)


John 3:16

 "God loved the world so much that He gave His uniquely-sired Son, with the result that anyone who believes in Him would never perish but have eternal life."


#7 brainout

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 07:35 AM

Sorry, Linux for Dummies seems poorly organized;  so it sits high on one of my shelves, gathering dust. If you know Linux already, you might find it useful.  And, if you have to have hard copy, that's probably the most common among them.  But so far as I know, it only comes in paperback.  Try betterworldbooks or Ebay, often the prices are cheaper because the books are used.

 

For me, best source I've found you already have:  "the man pages" (short for 'the manual pages').  Open a terminal, type help and the word or idea.  Or type a command which is never all the info the machine wants, so it gives help, instead. :)

 

Then again, I'm an impatient senior citizen so want instant gratification.

 

Or just bought this at Amazon.  And I just bought this book which seems like it's okay.  Far cheaper in Kindle but you want paperback, which it also has.  You can skim it from inside the Kindle, to see what the printed one will look like.

 

Of course, here's the Linux Bible.  TMI for me;  my eyes glaze over after reading the face pages.


Edited by brainout, 05 August 2015 - 08:05 AM.

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#8 Al1000

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 09:24 AM

I recommend A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming.

Regarding information on the computer try typing apropos followed by whatever you want to find out about. For example supposing you want to know how to copy files and directories in Linux:
 
al@my_desktop_pc:~$ apropos copy
Clone (3pm)          - recursively copy Perl datatypes
bcopy (3)            - copy byte sequence
copysign (3)         - copy sign of a number
copysignf (3)        - copy sign of a number
copysignl (3)        - copy sign of a number
cp (1)               - copy files and directories
cpgr (8)             - copy with locking the given file to the password or group file
cpio (1)             - copy files to and from archives
cppw (8)             - copy with locking the given file to the password or group file
dd (1)               - convert and copy a file
debconf-copydb (1)   - copy a debconf database
File::Copy::Recursive (3pm) - Perl extension for recursively copying files and directories
getunwind (2)        - copy the unwind data to caller's buffer
getutmp (3)          - copy utmp structure to utmpx, and vice versa
getutmpx (3)         - copy utmp structure to utmpx, and vice versa
gvfs-copy (1)        - Copy files
gvfs-move (1)        - Copy files
i686-linux-gnu-objcopy (1) - copy and translate object files
install (1)          - copy files and set attributes
mcopy (1)            - copy MSDOS files to/from Unix
memccpy (3)          - copy memory area
memcpy (3)           - copy memory area
memmove (3)          - copy memory area
mempcpy (3)          - copy memory area
ntfscp (8)           - copy file to an NTFS volume.
objcopy (1)          - copy and translate object files
rcp (1)              - secure copy (remote file copy program)
rsync (1)            - a fast, versatile, remote (and local) file-copying tool
scp (1)              - secure copy (remote file copy program)
ssh-copy-id (1)      - use locally available keys to authorise logins on a remote machine
stpcpy (3)           - copy a string returning a pointer to its end
stpncpy (3)          - copy a fixed-size string, returning a pointer to its end
strcpy (3)           - copy a string
strncpy (3)          - copy a string
va_copy (3)          - variable argument lists
wcpcpy (3)           - copy a wide-character string, returning a pointer to its end
wcpncpy (3)          - copy a fixed-size string of wide characters, returning a pointer to its end
wcscpy (3)           - copy a wide-character string
wcsncpy (3)          - copy a fixed-size string of wide characters
wmemcpy (3)          - copy an array of wide-characters
wmemmove (3)         - copy an array of wide-characters
wmempcpy (3)         - copy memory area
...which tells us that the command for copying files and directories in Linux is cp.

The man pages are very comprehensive, but info pages are more beginner friendly. As with man, simply type info followed by the command that you want to learn about.

Edited by Al1000, 05 August 2015 - 09:26 AM.


#9 Ubiq

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 11:17 AM

Brainout, AI1000, thank you!!! :flowers: :love4u:


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
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RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

Speccy


#10 Al1000

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 11:54 AM

You're more than welcome. :)

#11 DeimosChaos

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 01:24 PM

Definitely don't browse the man pages if you are just learning Linux, that will surely be a turnoff. They are typically quite boring and unless you know somewhat of what you are doing with that program, and can be confusing (trust me I know from experience! lol)

 

I don't really know of any good Linux books. I learned as I went and had an interest in Linux so I never really even thought of getting a book. Best way to learn is to just do and figure it out as you go (of course that doesn't help you current situation, sorry!)


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#12 MadmanRB

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 05:35 PM

Me I say to hell with the books, best way to learn is hands on experience


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

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#13 NickAu

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 06:50 AM

Hmmm Books.

 

You want to learn Linux?

 

Start using the keyboard and terminal. forget the mouse. Terminal is your best friend, There is nothing you cant do using terminal.

 

http://sourcedigit.com/15239-list-of-ubuntu-unity-desktop-shortcuts-ubuntu-unity-hotkeys/

An A-Z Index of the Bash command line | SS64.com

http://www.pixelbeat.org/cmdline.html

20 Funny Commands of Linux or Linux is Fun in Terminal

 

http://www.cyberciti.biz/open-source/learning-bash-scripting-for-beginners/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



#14 technonymous

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:32 AM

I know you didn't want a another link, but I couldn't resist. LInux Survival a neat little course of learning the basics and file structure. http://linuxsurvival.com/wp/?page_id=5&id=0


Edited by technonymous, 06 August 2015 - 11:33 PM.


#15 Ubiq

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 01:41 PM

I know you didn't want a another link, but I couldn't resist. LInux Survivial a neat little course of learning the basics and file structure. http://linuxsurvival.com/wp/?page_id=5&id=0

Links are great! Especially this one! I love it - it has me typing commands immediately! :busy:   Thank you! :love4u:

As for the books, I do really like a hard copy that I can drag around and maul with highlighters and sticky note bookmarks. I noticed in school that I can't handle tons of screen reading, even on specially designed e-readers. Apparently, I'm not the only one. With a good book, I'm maximizing my time spent in transit, or in other places that I can't be on a computer. I do agree with some of the other posters like NickAu that using linux is the best way to learn it, so the recommendations aren't for a replacement for hands-on learning, merely a hard copy supplement. Also, since I'm a notorious cheapo/poor person, I don't want to splash money on a book unless its worth my tiny shelf space. Hence the solicitation for suggestions.


Machine: Toshiba Portege r705-P41, Dual Boot: MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit; Ubuntu 15.04
CPU: Intel Core i5 460M @ 2.53GHz Arrandale 32nm Technology,
RAM: 4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 532MHz (7-7-7-20), Motherboard: TOSHIBA Portable PC (rBGA1288 Socket)
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics Revision 2 1720 MBytes

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